#1
if they are the same brand and guage?
Gear:

Ibanez RGT42DX
Boss MT-2
Last edited by JustinT80 at Mar 8, 2008,
#2
Same brand and guage, no they shouldn't.
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#4
swap one string at a time.

and intonation might change a little no matter.
you just need to check it all the time anyway.
Jenneh

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#5
^What she said.

Intonation can change with every string change and will also just shift over time as environmental factors change. You should check your intonation every once in a while and be fully knowledgeable on how to make adjustments.
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#6
Quote by jj1565
swap one string at a time.

and intonation might change a little no matter.
you just need to check it all the time anyway.


Well you learn something new every day, I would have thought that manufacturing tolerances would've made this for the most part unneccessary.

In all honesty unless I've been making major changes or picked up a guitar that I haven't played in a while I've never bothered too much. However as you've mentioned checking such things regularly really is best practice and I should do it more often.
I see Mother Nature equipped you for a battle of wits in the same way she equipped cows for supersonic flight.
Last edited by BigBaldIan at Mar 9, 2008,
#7
yeah, i mean, also depends on the bridge type and how you change strings.

sometimes ill get a thread where the guy didnt stabilize a trem before cutting off his strings. that's a mess.

even with a TOM, there's can be problems. bridges pop off when all the tension is released.

on lesser quality guitars an intonation spring might not be stiff enough, and when tension is off the saddle can shift. stuff like that.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#8
actually, your intonation might go off even if you stick with the same gauge and brand, because the string companies are likely to change the quantity and balance of the strings' components over time.

this could be for financial or quality reasons - who knows - but the fact remains that your intonation can go off even with the same brand and gauge, so check it regularly.

by the way, on my Les Paul the little screws that change the intonation are hard to reach with a conventional screwdriver. i can cope, but it's a pain in the arse so does anyone know of a way to change the intonation on a Les Paul without taking the strings off?
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my gear:

Gibson LP Standard
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Classical guitar
Peavey ValveKing 112
Marshall MG15
BOSS ME-50
#9
some guys flip the bridge (making sure to flip the saddles too. )

i use a tiny screwdriver, like the type you see in eye glass cases.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#10
Quote by jj1565
yeah, i mean, also depends on the bridge type and how you change strings.

sometimes ill get a thread where the guy didnt stabilize a trem before cutting off his strings. that's a mess.

even with a TOM, there's can be problems. bridges pop off when all the tension is released.

on lesser quality guitars an intonation spring might not be stiff enough, and when tension is off the saddle can shift. stuff like that.


+1 on the TOM, set up a mate's Epi Les Paul Junior with 11s (in E standard as well) wasn't thinking and suddenly CLANG.......bugger.........

Ended up putting the high and low Es on and just taking the slack out to hold the damn thing in place, whilst I tried to get it sorted.

Quote by chillrock
actually, your intonation might go off even if you stick with the same gauge and brand, because the string companies are likely to change the quantity and balance of the strings' components over time.


Actually that's a very good point and a timely reminder not to take anything for granted.
I see Mother Nature equipped you for a battle of wits in the same way she equipped cows for supersonic flight.