#1
lately i have been trying to stop using the straight up standard minor box for soloing and have started to move around the neck but when i do the solo instantly starts to sound a little off can i get some tips on how to get a nicer sound from the pentatonics while still moving around a little for variety
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along with fire escape routes...

#2
what exactly does 'move around the neck' mean?
Are you still playing in the appropriate scale/s?
Do u know the shapes of the other pentatonic boxes and where they are?
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#3
yes i know my pentatonics quite well its just that when i shift from one position to another it starts to sound a little off key but i am still in the right key and doing the right shape
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#4
Hmm. well i dunno. try finishing phrases on the root note. that's all i can offer.
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i think ur gonna get flamed pretty bad.

Gear:
Peavey 5150 Combo
LTD MH-1000 NT
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#5
Are you playing to a chord progression? Because what shape may sound good with a C, will not sound good with a D or F in the same key if you are merely maintaining the shape and shuffling it around.
#6
Quote by aradine
yes i know my pentatonics quite well its just that when i shift from one position to another it starts to sound a little off key but i am still in the right key and doing the right shape

forget shapes and check the NOTES you're playing.

I have a feeling you're just moving the basic box pattern as opposed to actually playing the same notes in different places.
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#7
Quote by steven seagull
forget shapes and check the NOTES you're playing.

I have a feeling you're just moving the basic box pattern as opposed to actually playing the same notes in different places.


I was just gonna suggest that.
#8
i am not using the same old standard shape in the scale i'll show you the two shapes i use

e|------------------------5-8
b|-------------------5-8
g|---------------5-7
d|----------5-7
a|-----5-7
e|5-8

then i move to the next shape

e|------------------------8-10
b|-------------------8-10
g|---------------7-9
d|----------7-10
a|-----7-10
e|8-10

which according to my guitar teacher is me still in key even though that is the C major pentatonic due to relative major/minor
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#9
Quote by aradine
i am not using the same old standard shape in the scale i'll show you the two shapes i use

e|------------------------5-8
b|-------------------5-8
g|---------------5-7
d|----------5-7
a|-----5-7
e|5-8

then i move to the next shape

e|------------------------8-10
b|-------------------8-10
g|---------------7-9
d|----------7-10
a|-----7-10
e|8-10

which according to my guitar teacher is me still in key even though that is the C major pentatonic due to relative major/minor


It is not the C major pentatonic. The progression will dictate the key. C major is not even remotely similar to A minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
in the pentatonics A minor is the relative minor of C major if you where to do an A minor scale from shape 1 to shape 5 shape 2 would be the standard minor shape then shape 3 is the standard major shape making them realtive

and just to clarify i am using normally shapes 1 2 and 3 in soloing NOT moving the standard minor shape up and down the neck

(also before someone says learn your modes i know the modes just can't be assed using them and besides i play alot of AC/DC, G 'n' R and other similar stuff which is almost all based around the pentatonics)
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#11
in the pentatonics A minor is the relative minor of C major if you where to do an A minor scale from shape 1 to shape 5 shape 2 would be the standard minor shape then shape 3 is the standard major shape making them realtive


A minor and C major are relative because they share the same key signature, but they are not the same thing. Scales are not box shapes. The second shape is not C major when the tonal center is A. The progression determines the mode.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
A minor and C major are relative because they share the same key signature, but they are not the same thing. Scales are not box shapes. The second shape is not C major when the tonal center is A. The progression determines the mode.


Fair enough, but it probably isn't relevant to his original question.
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#13
You need to forget the shapes and concentrate on the NOTES. Granted the shapes are comprised of notes that will fit over certain chord progressions, but some notes are still "stronger" than others and will fit better...although there's 20-odd individual fret positions in those two shapes there's only 5 notes.

The root note of a scale is always the strongest when played over the same chord, but if the chord changes then stressing the root note won't always sound as good and you need to look to other notes within the scale that complement the other chords better.
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#14
Quote by aradine


which according to my guitar teacher is me still in key even though that is the C major pentatonic due to relative major/minor


So, yeah, essentially what you're doing is using the same notes you were using
before and you'd still be playing A minor pent. Basically, you're just not used to
that position. If you've been using that other pattern for a while, you've developed
some intuition as to how the notes will sound, but you don't have that for this
other position. Understanding the equivalent notes you're playing in either
position will help you be able to acclimate newer stuff more easily.