#1
I just bought a M-Audio Delta 1010LT. I can't figure out how to connect my guitar to the RCA jacks it has. Can someone suggest me the optimum method of connecting my guitar to the RCA jacks.
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#2
Via a mixer.

(Edit) However I would recommend putting something between your guitar and the card, for example a Vox Tonelab or a Boss GT amp simulator. I will sound better I think.
Last edited by metallhead at Mar 9, 2008,
#3
Quote by invincibleneo
I just bought a M-Audio Delta 1010LT. I can't figure out how to connect my guitar to the RCA jacks it has. Can someone suggest me the optimum method of connecting my guitar to the RCA jacks.


Use a direct box and connect it to one of the microphone (XLR) inputs. You could get expensive boxes (by Whirlwind) that can do it with RCA, but I think it's unnecessary.

And as metal said, unless you have software amps already on the computer, it's best to get a good amp simulator...Boss, Line6, and Zoom make great ones, that can even connect to USB thereby freeing up some inputs on your soundcard.
#4
I have a amplifier. I will be going through that. Do I still need a direct box or a mixer?
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#5
Quote by invincibleneo
I have a amplifier. I will be going through that. Do I still need a direct box or a mixer?


You can connect the line out (headphone) from your amp to one of the inputs. You need a special cable for that but it should work.

You also need a computer program for recording, something like Reaper or Audacity. Otherwise you are not going to hear any sound.
#6
Quote by invincibleneo
I have a amplifier. I will be going through that. Do I still need a direct box or a mixer?



With your Microcube, no. You can use the output on its back, and connect with a TRS-RCA cable.
#7
I have Cubase SX3. Will this TRS-RCA cable give me the optimum result? Because the sound I get is very Bass-ey. The amp sounds much better.
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#8
You can always eq out the bassy-ness in Cubase.
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#9
but if the eq is flat n im getting high bass....isnt there something wrong?
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#10
Quote by metallhead
Via a mixer.

(Edit) However I would recommend putting something between your guitar and the card, for example a Vox Tonelab or a Boss GT amp simulator. I will sound better I think.


Why on earth would he need a mixer, for one signal?

DI it, or use some sort of amp simulator like a POD. You just can't go direct as their is an impedance mismatch between your guitar and the inputs.
#11
Quote by take_it_t
Why on earth would he need a mixer, for one signal?


Well, you don't usually have only one signal do you. I mean you might want to play along a cd player, mp3 player computer etc, maybe a drum machine, keyboard, microphone etc.

Even you only have one signal you can use the mixer to leave the computer out or put into the loop if you choose to without switching any cables. That is if you have a POD or GT-8. Not to mention that if you ever want to play with others or live a mixer is really handy.

I did suggest a mixer because a mixer also gives you a lot of options (sure, it depends on the mixer) regarding inputs and outputs and choices of cables that you want to use.

So there you go. Anyway, this thread is about something else.

Cheers.
#12
I got 10 inputs and 10 outputs on my soundcard. So I'm not worried of falling short of inputs or outputs. The impedence level will be matched by my amps "Rec Out", won't it?

But again the sound from the amp speaker seems ok. But on the computer it comes bassey. My logic is that if its bassey when the EQ is flat, then there something wrong.
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#13
Did you try bypassing the computer? Is the signal still bassy? Maybe that's how it comes out of the amp. Listen to the output channel of your amp through some high quality headphones or just plug it into the computer speakers you use. The speakers could also be the reason why it sounds bassy. What speakers do you have?
#14
Unless you have a set of studio monitors or high quality cans, you're not going to be able to tell though. Any other speaker is going to color your sound in such away that you can't tell a difference between "recorded that way" or "played back that way".

Whenever you mix you'll be EQing anyways, so just roll of the bass on the guitar track.
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#15
Quote by Death-Speak
Unless you have a set of studio monitors or high quality cans, you're not going to be able to tell though. Any other speaker is going to color your sound in such away that you can't tell a difference between "recorded that way" or "played back that way".

Whenever you mix you'll be EQing anyways, so just roll of the bass on the guitar track.


+1. That's why I was asking about the speakers/monitors.
#16
Quote by metallhead
Well, you don't usually have only one signal do you. I mean you might want to play along a cd player, mp3 player computer etc, maybe a drum machine, keyboard, microphone etc.

Even you only have one signal you can use the mixer to leave the computer out or put into the loop if you choose to without switching any cables. That is if you have a POD or GT-8. Not to mention that if you ever want to play with others or live a mixer is really handy.

I did suggest a mixer because a mixer also gives you a lot of options (sure, it depends on the mixer) regarding inputs and outputs and choices of cables that you want to use.

So there you go. Anyway, this thread is about something else.

Cheers.


Its handy, but its far from being a solution here, plus he has an audio interface with 10 ins and outs, which would mean he has enough to send 10 audio signals at once to his computer. I can see where you are coming from, but suggesting a mixer to plug a guitar into a computer like that doesn't make total sense, also considering the fact that you'd still need a DI between the guitar and the mixer. But it isn't the direct solution here.

Get a DI to put between the computer and the guitar signal, assuming you're not already using something that would act like a DI (eg POD). I've found that without using a DI on hi-z inputs you get a fair bit of bass distortion.
Last edited by take_it_t at Mar 13, 2008,
#17
What will a DI do that my amp 'rec out' won't do? Isn't the duty of the 'rec out' to 'preamp' the sound from the guitar upto to a recievable level?
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.