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#1
i was wondering what you all think i should do reguarding learning music theroy, scales, chord progressions, etc. im already self taught. ive been playing for one year. this came up when i was playing holy wars, and i noticed such a huge difference between marty freidman's solos and dave mustaine's solo. marty's solos were more diverse and sounded good. but dave mustaine's solo was easy to learn despite how fast and hard it sounds, but was not very diverse at all. i beleive marty freidman has some music education. but i didnt want musical education to ruin my creativity with writing and solos. what do you think iu should do. thanks

my gear:

gibson les paul studio

line 6 spider 3 75 watt amplifier
#6
Yes, please learn theory, it makes jamming and everything so much better. When you know theory, you can actually play the guitar. It wont ruin your creativity if you dont let it. Just remember, its a guideline, what sounds good is the actual rule.
Gear

'07 Ibanez RG1570MRB Prestige
'97 Ibanez RGR570 - V7/Dimarzio Fast Track/ Dimarzio PAF Pro
Westfield SG Copy
Westfield Strat Copy
Falcon Acoustic
Peavey Valveking 212
Roland Microcube
Unbranded 15W Starter Amp
#10
yea it's what I'm doing right now...I know a lot of guitarists that don't know **** for theory though...so its not really that important unless you wanna write your own stuff or improvise
#11
Sorry but how exactly are scales and solos connected. Do you just change up a scale a bit (hammer ons holding nots longer ect) and theres your solo..?

I've been practicing scales a lot and I can go through many quite fast but I'm wondering what good this will do me, other then faster playing.
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#12
you don't have to tell us what gear you have so we can decide whether or not you should study theory.

and yes, study theory.
peanuts and beers
#14
If you can play one single note on your guitar then you already know "theory".

Theory is simply the understanding of music. It's science applied to music. It's the study of what sounds "good" and what sounds "bad". It is impossible to "not know theory". If you sing in the shower you "know some theory".

So continue learning everything that you possibly can about music and you will be learning "theory".

As for "scales". Scales are part of music. They're a building block. Every thing is constructed form a scale with the exception of percussion. Chords, melodies, progressions etc. Since they're such an integral part of music can you think of a good reason not to learn them ? Why would you learn how to fret a note but not play a scale. I will never understand this huge distinction between "playing" and "theory" that a lot of beginners somehow get into their head. There is no distinction.
#16
Yes, I regret never learning theory because i find songwriting fairly difficult right now
ohai little sig.
#19
yeah, i've been learning theory for a while and if anything it's helped me understand guitar much, much better. Once you get better at it you don't have to stick to basic theory, just use it as a guideline.
"You'd stick your head in fire if I told you that you could see Hell"- Otis, House of 1000 Corpses
#20
Yeah I didn't the thread title that's why I made the comment and removed it.
#23
Quote by floppypick
Sorry but how exactly are scales and solos connected. Do you just change up a scale a bit (hammer ons holding nots longer ect) and theres your solo..?

I've been practicing scales a lot and I can go through many quite fast but I'm wondering what good this will do me, other then faster playing.
Here's an excerpt from an interview with guitar virtuoso Ana Vidovic

André: During the courses you insisted very much on the practising of the scales. Could you explain why this is so important for you?

Ana: My teacher always encouraged me to play scales all the time. He would even write the scales down, a lot of different types of scales that I should practice. He always encouraged me to do it every day, at least half an hour, even more. I think everything starts from the scales. There are so many things that you can solve in the scales, without even practising the piece. Like I was telling today, if you have a problem to solve, your hand is like this or like that, you have a bad sound, any kind of problem, you can always solve it with a scale. As long as you practise scales. There are also a lot of variations that you can do with the scale. You can also practise slurs, vibrato, tremolo, anything. It is also important how you practise the scale. It’s not just a scale. It has to be slow, you have to be concentrated, you have to use the metronome. Many things. It doesn’t have to be anything complicated, just basic scales. It is what you do with it that is important.
#24
Why the **** do people assume that by learning musical theory you are therefore completely void of any emotional capability in your music?
#25
Quote by Archaon
Why the **** do people assume that by learning musical theory you are therefore completely void of any emotional capability in your music?
Because they always say a bunch of sh*t like "Dude, look at Jimi Hendrix or Robert Johnson".
#26
By learning theory, you are only giving yourself more options other than what you already have set in your brain. I am big on jazz, where creativity is everything. If you don't have your scales down cold, you don't have sh*t. Scales and arpeggios are the bag from which you draw on things to make original phrases.

The Madcap mentioned that people always say "look at Jimi!" Maybe he was never "trained" but I bet he new exactly what certain things would sound like and how to use it.
I have nothing witty to say here at the moment

Expect a change soon
#27
acually marty doesnt really use the scale theory stuff...he doesnt really play in a key or a scale...watch some of his vids...he kinda takes the chords he uses...and solos with the notes in the chord...i cant explain it...and he uses a lot of arpeggios...theres a vid called melodic mind control or something...in fact he accually says dont get bogged down learning scales...play what sounds good...
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#28
Of course that you should learn theory and scales.
It will not only improve your playing and understanding of music. It'll also allow you to for example, jam with other musicians over tracks that you never heard before.
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#29
Well, Marty Friedman didn't have any formal training, I believe. Rather, theory that he picked up are details he figured out by himself.

However, one thing that distinguishes him from guitarists like Dave Mustaine is that he takes the time to really think about what he is doing. He thinks about the relationship between the melody and the chord. He also takes on a jazz approach of following the chord changes. And although he doesn't specifically think about the modal position or particular scale he is using for every chord, he works out scales that he came up with by himself to certain types of chords. So, he doesn't have any formal training on scalar usage, but he picks out a chord and start building a scale that sounds fitting. Again, he thinks about his playing and that is how he achieves a great sound. Watch his video Melodic Control, he talks about all of this stuff in that video.

Anyways, as someone who is formally trained, I honestly use little applied theory knowledge when it comes to playing rock. I use my ear more to see what sounds good. And like Friedman, I try to think about my playing and not just try to slop through a passage by shredding blindly. I think theory is better used in jazz and classical. However, it still doesn't hurt to learn. It helps make music, such as knowing how to use a cadence to end the phrasing or section of a song, and using a relative minor scale on top of a major chord.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#30
Go on Video Google and search for "Marty Friedman Melodic Control".

If it hasn't been posted already. It's a great instructional video that should give you a general idea of what music theory could do for you, in the way what it has done for him and HIS sound.
#32
Well I'll put it like this, in my early playing days I always tried to make stuff up, solos, chord progressions but found it extremely difficult to make up original stuff (rather than something which just sounds incredibly like a song I like) And I coulden't improvise if my life depended on it.

Then I learn't some basic theory, some scales and chords and whatnot. Suddenly I found my creativity came out, I could write songs - both solos and riffs/chord progressions, and it was all original and different. My improvisation really picked up, which I now love doing. I often spend over an hour of my daily practice just improvising.

I am definetly NOT a guru of theory, I only know the very basics!! But the very basics really helped a tonne.

Scales are also a great way of getting your technique better (including the much sought after speed :P ) and are good for warmups.
#34
Learn English, then theory. They'll both be good for you. Then replace the Spider.
#35
I say learn it but always remember that your own mind is more important in understanding what you are playing and want to play. Don't use scales like they're the most important thing. Learn them to help warm your hands up and get familiar with the sounds of the fretboard and familiar with what sounds come from where. Once you've got all that down and you're just improvising all day and learning stuff from ear, you'll maybe forget a lot of theory anyway.
What's the most important thing is understanding what you want to play and why good songs sound good to you and how you can transfer your thoughts into music.
#36
Well yeah, basic modes and scales are kind of essential.

I don't know much else but I can't see how it's really necessary to be honest.
#37
Quote by floppypick
Sorry but how exactly are scales and solos connected. Do you just change up a scale a bit (hammer ons holding nots longer ect) and theres your solo..?

I've been practicing scales a lot and I can go through many quite fast but I'm wondering what good this will do me, other then faster playing.


By learning scales, it will help you stay in key with your solos. And Music Theory will help with transitions, blues notes if u want them, and other fun stuff like switching between major and minor.

Either way, knowing scales and theory will make you a better player. Period
#38
Don't learn the scales themselves

ex.
Am Pentatonic Position 1
E|-----5---8-----|
B|-----5---8-----|
G|-----5---7-----|
D|-----5---7-----|
A|-----5---7-----|
E|-----5---8-----|



Instead learn the method of making scales and the notes themselves, that way you can actually just play instead of doing a box method or something like that

ex
Major- w w h w w w h w (If I'm not mistaken)

then the notes in the scale (key of G)

G A B C D E F# G and the find where ALL those notes are on the neck and just be awesome
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
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#39
Quote by LD_Luke D
i was wondering what you all think i should do reguarding learning music theroy, scales, chord progressions, etc. im already self taught. ive been playing for one year. this came up when i was playing holy wars, and i noticed such a huge difference between marty freidman's solos and dave mustaine's solo. marty's solos were more diverse and sounded good. but dave mustaine's solo was easy to learn despite how fast and hard it sounds, but was not very diverse at all. i beleive marty freidman has some music education. but i didnt want musical education to ruin my creativity with writing and solos. what do you think iu should do. thanks

my gear:

gibson les paul studio

line 6 spider 3 75 watt amplifier

why would it?

I can't see any good reason for not learning theory.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#40
This sounds like something I could do with aswell.

I know basic theory, and about 2 scales, but it's never something I've bothered with.

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