#1
So I'm a songwriter, and in writing a song, I found that my bassline lacked something. What it lacked was a constant volume. What I mean is, just playing a note and letting it ring is not what I'm looking for, I want it to just keep going, like if you were playing a wind instrument. So I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on how to play it while keeping the volume going? Its a slow song too, so it is very important to let it keep going.
Any ideas?
#2
compressor/sustainer, or just use a synth patch that sounds semirealistic.
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#3
If you wrote this song with drums, you can prettymuch have the bassline mimic the kick pattern of the drums. Slow or fast, that will usually work for a simple groove.
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#6
i always wondered how he did that!

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#8
Quote by DanielQ
hard to say without hearing the song. you could play whole notes or something....

Did you read his original post properly? He said playing one note and just letting it ring until it fades out isn't enough, he wants a constant tone.

TS, Ebow is definitely the way to go.
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#10
Quote by indie-bassist
Did you read his original post properly? He said playing one note and just letting it ring until it fades out isn't enough, he wants a constant tone.


My bad. Still hard to say without hearing the music. I've never used an ebow, but it sounds sounds like a good option. But isn't it made for the guitar and not bass?
#11
Quote by DanielQ
My bad. Still hard to say without hearing the music. I've never used an ebow, but it sounds sounds like a good option. But isn't it made for the guitar and not bass?


Seems to work fine for Manring.
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#12
Quote by DanielQ
My bad. Still hard to say without hearing the music. I've never used an ebow, but it sounds sounds like a good option. But isn't it made for the guitar and not bass?


You are right... but I refer to the Ebow's site FAQ.

Does the EBow work on bass?

The EBow was designed for guitar string spacing. It gets its necessary alignment by resting on the strings adjacent to the one you're playing. To play the EBow on bass, you must accomplish this critical alignment in challenging ways. You can rest the EBow between the strings and tilt it sideways to get the string you want to play to run down the drive channel. You can use your forefinger and thumb off the edges of the EBow to create "grooves" that catch the adjacent strings. Or, you can just hold the EBow in the proper position through sheer will and determination. Light gauge strings and a touch of distortion can prove useful, especially in the harmonic mode. Michael Manring has perfected the use of EBow on bass.

(http://www.ebow.com/ebow/faq.htm)