#1
Aright, so I left my electric guitar, a Washburn N1 (fairly new) in a chair overnight. I do this pretty often, so I didn't expect anything to happen. When I went back to it in the morning, put it on and plugged it in, then turned the amp on, there was no sound. After my brother pointed out that it wasn't plugged in, I was confused. I looked, and sure enough it was unplugged. When I tried to plug it in again, it fell straight out. I looked at the input jack on the guitar, and the nut that usually sits on the outside of the jack was gone. Well, after searching, I found the nut, but what do I do now? Is this a quick fix that I can do myself? Or should I take it in to a music store to have it looked at by a professional? Any help is greatly appreciated.
My Rig:
Washburn N1
Digitech Death Metal
Yorkville XM50
#2
If the threaded portion of the jack is still protruding, just tighten the nut onto it and it will be fine.
If not, you'll need to remove the jackplate, and then reattach the jack to it.
Epiphone Les Paul goldtop (EMG 81/85)
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Fender Telecaster MIM
Epiphone SG Special
Jay Turser JT200 Serpent (GFS Crunchy Rails/Crunchy Pat)
Dean V-Coustic
Ovation Celebrity
Bugera 333-212
Crate Blue Voodoo 120H
#3
It is a easy fix just screw it back on if it came from the outside part of the jack if it came from the inside portion some how it's still relatively easy just remove the jack plate and screw it in there no real harm you could do fixing this yourself
#4
Do not take it to a guitar shop for a simple task like screwing on a nut. They will over change you.
#5
Get a product called LOCTITE thread locker use the blue or green not the red. the red is high strength and you will never get it off again. When you go to put it back on put a dab on the threads of the Jack and a dab on the threads of the nut. Hold the Jack from behind when tightening so it does not spin and rip the wires out.
YA GOTTA HIT IT ON THE ONE
pics of gear updated on profile 11/16/09
#6
Don't just screw the nut back on to the guitar. If it's not done properly, the portion of the input jack INSIDE the guitar can spin around, eventually detaching the wires attached to the jack.

You need to unscrew the input jack and pull it slightly out of the guitar, then screw the nut back on while securely holding the inside of the jack still so it doesn't spin (Pic courtesy of jj1565):


If you take it to a shop instead of doing it yourself, see if it's possible to put a locking washer onto the input jack. That may help prevent it from loosening up again in the future.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#7
You should always take off the jackplate to fix such an issue, because if you just screw the nut back on you'll run the risk of twisting the jack itself and tearing a wire off somewhere. And you may want to consider putting a belleville washer on there.

And there's no need for Loctite- you can just borrow some womanfolk's nail varnish.

Edit: Yeah, like above.
#8
Thanks for all the help, everybody. Right after the third reply, I went to my guitar and screwed around with the input jack for about a half hour. I had to remove a panel on the back of the guitar to get to it, but I managed to fix the jack, and when I tested it, it worked fine, so I guess I didn't screw it up completely. I really appreciate the advice of everybody here. I wouldn't have tried a repair like this myself in a thousand years. Peace.
My Rig:
Washburn N1
Digitech Death Metal
Yorkville XM50
#9
Alright then. You're saved! Another piece of advice, though: It's called an output jack.
#10
Aright, guys that helped me out last time, I have another problem with the same part of the same guitar (Washburn N1). I was playing it this evening, and suddenly it (the output jack) started shorting out whenever the cord plugged into it wasn't angled a certain way. I tried rotating the cables I was using (I was running the signal through a pedal and into the amp), and the shorting happened again, so I'm fairly certain they're not the problem. Subsequently, I took the plate covering the output jack off (make whatever jokes you will about that line), pulled the plug itself out of the compartment, and noticed that one of the wires had come unsoldered. I'm supposing this is the real issue. Again, as with the original post, is this something I can fix myself? Or should I take it in to the local music shop to make sure I don't screw something else up even worse? And if I can fix it, how? Any and all advice/help is welcome and greatly appreciated.
My Rig:
Washburn N1
Digitech Death Metal
Yorkville XM50
#11
If you know what part of the jack is the lead and which bit is the ground then you should be able to solder it back on easily. You'll have to have some basic knowledge and skills, though.

My best bet is that what happened is the thing I described in my first post in this thread- that the jack has been fakey-tightened once too many so the wires have been wrung loose.

...look into that belleville washer if there's enough of the thread jutting out for it.

P.S.- I'm glad you're saying output now...
#12
Just for you, Pikka Bird. Chu. Man.
Also, is there any way to prevent the jack from loosening itself constantly?
My Rig:
Washburn N1
Digitech Death Metal
Yorkville XM50
Last edited by DuffMcKagan7179 at May 6, 2008,
#13
Yes. Tighten it properly before screwing the jack plate onto the guitar again. Also, that washer I'm mentioning will lock the parts together using the miraculous powers of spring steel.

It'd go on like this:

///||(|//

Explanation, from L-R: The left side is outside the guitar. The /// are the threads on the jack socket. The double vertical lines are the nut, the paranthesis is the belleville washer and the single vertical line is the jack plate and the last slashes are the rest of the jack socket.

Does that make sense?
#14
Yeah, makes sense enough to me. So, how much are these washers, and where can I find one?
My Rig:
Washburn N1
Digitech Death Metal
Yorkville XM50
#16
Quote by SOUPerman432321
get a guitar thats not a washburn...

Aside from the issues I've had with the output jack, this Washburn plays like a dream. It plays smoothly, even though the action's almost all the way up, and I've never had any other issues with it. Also, while I know this shouldn't be the only reason for liking a brand, if Washburn suffices for Jon Donais, Dan Donegan, Mike Kennedy, Sammy Hagar, and Nuno Bettencourt, it damn sure suffices for me.
My Rig:
Washburn N1
Digitech Death Metal
Yorkville XM50
Last edited by DuffMcKagan7179 at May 6, 2008,
#17
Quote by DuffMcKagan7179
Yeah, makes sense enough to me. So, how much are these washers, and where can I find one?

They'd cost... less than a nickel if you can find a place that sells them one by one. I doubt you'd be willing to buy a whole box. I don't know how your stores are stocked over there, but I'd think any hardware store would have one.

In case you don't know what you're looking for:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/Belleville_washer.JPG

Just make sure it fits onto the socket.


edit: One thing, though- you'll probably have to use a wrench to hold the socket while you screw your jack plate assembly together if you wanna torque it up properly.

Quote by SOUPerman432321
get a guitar thats not a washburn...

Eat it, blondie. Washburns rule. The mechanical principle of the threaded shaft + nut is not a Washburn-exclusive feature either, you know.
Last edited by Pikka Bird at May 6, 2008,