#1
Calling UG's mathematicians/scientists/wiki-heads. I just noticed this "trend" of 3's. I mean triplets obviously, 3/4 time, etc. Various rhythmic patterns...heavy metal gallop! haha...but it's not just music, writers, poets use what I *think* are called tripling to create modernist meter in poetry. I know Melville used it in his prose, always putting adjectives in groups of 3. There must be some kind of acoustic phenomena to this no? ...my curiousity needs satiation.
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#2
OH noes! and 4's are crazy too!! 1/4 notes, 4/4 time. sixteenth notes (4 notes a beat), 12 bar blues (4 of this, 4 of that), it's madness!

edit: don't forget the interval of the Perfect 4th. why is it so perfect?? 4's!!!!!!!!!! ahhh!!!!!!! *head explodes*


(sorry for stupidity, twas needed to prove point that it's all nonsense)
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#4
I heard once that a lot of rhythmic stuff has to do with the heartbeat. For example, the iambic rhythm in poetry (weak-STRONG-weak-STRONG, etc. Shakespearean sonnets, for one) follows the rythm of the heart (ba-DUM, ba-DUM). So...
Listen to your heartbeat. ba-DUM, ba-DUM. It's not straight eigths, is it? There's a "comma" of sorts, which is the 3rd part of a triplet (that's how I hear it anyway). So it's more like ba-DUM-(rest)-ba-DUM-(rest). The triplet is natural to our ears because it's part of our natural rhythms. That's how I figure it.
#6
as four the perfect 4th...I know the answer! yay. It's because when that interval is played, the frequencies(hz) of the two tones when overlapped, create a ratio that is rational...a small fraction. Because of "harmonic phenomena" our ears are more pleased with smaller frequency ratios. The two most displeasing ratios are the diminished 2nd, and the tritone. How's that head metal4all?

But I'm going off topic in my own thread. Four seems like a "friendlier" number. 3 is prime. So that's why it seems weird. <-as you can see, I'm no mathematician. And there are no pitches/frequencies/tempo to consider...just rhythm.

EDIT: that heartbeat thing sounds interesting - personally my heart beats in bossa mova rhythm, should I see a doctor?
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Last edited by KryptNet at Mar 9, 2008,
#7
Quote by KryptNet
as four the perfect 4th...I know the answer! yay. It's because when that interval is played, the frequencies(hz) of the two tones when overlapped, create a ratio that is rational...a small fraction. Because of "harmonic phenomena" our ears are more pleased with smaller frequency ratios. The two most displeasing ratios are the diminished 2nd, and the tritone. How's that head metal4all?

But I'm going off topic in my own thread. Four seems like a "friendlier" number. 3 is prime. So that's why it seems weird. <-as you can see, I'm no mathematician.

The minor 2nd. A diminished second would be an interval of a perfect prime or the same note played twice which in effect is no interval because an interval would imply a gap.

It is also called a perfect fourth because it inverts to a perfect 5th. Perfects invert to perfects.


My theory is ok. I was just being dumb because you can find all sorts of weird number things like that anywhere.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#8
Quote by metal4all
The minor 2nd. A diminished second would be an interval of a perfect prime or the same note played twice which in effect is no interval because an interval would imply a gap.

It is also called a perfect fourth because it inverts to a perfect 5th. Perfects invert to perfects.
yes minor 2nd...or more specifically a major chroma interval. thank you for correcting me.

I wasn't saying your theory is off at all. Both P4 and P5 are indeed called "perfect" because of the science behind how the brain interprets certain frequencies. The perfects, P4, P5, P8, have the smallest frequency ratios thus are theoretically most pleasing to the ear. EDIT: that's acoustic theory, not music theory.
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#9
Quote by KryptNet
yes minor 2nd...or more specifically a major chroma interval. thank you for correcting me.

I wasn't saying your theory is off at all. Both P4 and P5 are indeed called "perfect" because of the science behind how the brain interprets certain frequencies. The perfects, P4, P5, P8, have the smallest frequency ratios thus are theoretically most pleasing to the ear. EDIT: that's acoustic theory, not music theory.

It basically is music theory because of when you start talking about the consonance and dissonance of intervals. That isn't just what sounds pleasing though it's how stable an interval is (if it wants to resolve or not).

ok this is just a little bit off subject.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#10
putting adjectives in groups of 3.


thats used a lot in irish speech patterns
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Tell me what nation on this earth, was not born of tragedy-Primordial
#11
I think this is like the movie 23, putting significance in numbers where there isn't necessarily any true meaning there.


23 is derived from the law of fives,

The Law of Fives states simply that: all phenomena are directly or indirectly related to the number five, and this relationship can always be demonstrated given enough ingenuity on the part of the demonstrator.
The Law of Fives is never wrong. – Malaclypse the Younger, Principia Discordia, Page 00016


which is saying, that if you trylook hard enough you will always find what your looking for. Putting the carriage ahead of the horse. Not really related to this topic, however.

There must be some kind of acoustic phenomena to this no? ...my curiousity needs satiation.


3 is just a nice number. It's the shortest a list possible. The longest being around 7 where the average human mind starts to tinker off. So no, as someone said above, it has nothing to do with acoustics and everything to do with short human attention span.
#12
Quote by capiCrimm
So no, as someone said above, it has nothing to do with acoustics and everything to do with short human attention span.
Now, see...that I can take as a reasonable answer. I shall call it, The A.D.D. Theory of Acoustics
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#13
VERY Interesting topic. The same reason why we see symetry as beauty because people are symetrical. It all goes back to the ancient principle of who is the best mate. Competition and beauty are the most basic thing us organisms involve ourselves with. I have put alot of thought into this throughout my life.