#1
Accidentals, Where do they come from and how do I use them in soloing?

If I am playing over chords of C major say, and then i want to have a solo moment, it will be ok to use C ionian, but what if I want to make a kick ass solo and do some emotional showing of by chucking in some accidentals that actually fit the chords.
Where would I pull those accidentals from, and why would they fit?

By saying why would they fit in, I mean do they come from modes or pulled from another key?
#2
I think you mean chromatic notes because accidentals is just a name for symbols indicating whether a note is flat, sharp or natural
#3
Ah, no. Accidentals are notes that aren't in the key. an F# in C major is an accidental.

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#5
Look into secondary dominant chords, if you learn how they work, it will help you understand how non chord tones can fit into the key signature. I'm not going to go into depth because it gets pretty complicated, but thats basically what you're asking about.
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#6
Quote by Lum
and do some emotional showing of




Whatcha gonna do? Weep all over my boots?

Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#7
Quote by RichieJovie
Choosing notes outside the standard harmony may create emotion....although that emotion is possibly nausea. The best way to create emotion is phrasing/vibrato and timing combined with dynamics.
Kindly ignore this.
#8
Quote by RichieJovie
Why?


Because it's completely ridiculous. Don't be a diatonic whore.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by RichieJovie
sigh.

Trolls... gotta love em.


Your ignoarance is really quite remarkable. Arch is one of the most knowledgable members of this website.

Not to mention that your remark is completely ridiculous and inaccurate. I know several thousand songs and can think of only a few that only use diatonic notes.
#10
Quote by RichieJovie
Oh right I stand corrected.


I strongly suggest listening to any jazz, classical, or progressive song ever recorded. The statement that any chromatic note will sound somehow wrong is just ridiculous.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Mar 9, 2008,
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
Don't be a diatonic whore.
I literally LOL'd. Diatonic *****...oh man, I'm gonna call someone that the next chance I get. Oh, c'mon UG filters! ***** is not that bad of a word! sorry off topic.
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#14
You can play notes out of the scale, but try to not say on there for long.
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#16
Quote by RichieJovie
The question was worded in such a way as to suggest that the person didn't have the biggest indepth understanding of music to start with, you are suggesting running before they can walk.

Good trolling though.


You have no idea what that word means. Stop using it.
When you present blatantly false information, don't be surprised when people call you on it. Suck it up.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
I hate being such a mom about this but the situation calls for it:

RickieJovie, You're wrong, there's no debate about it. Stop trying to win.

The rest of you should ignore this guy and focus on the question as he's obviously going to try and have the last word.

@Lum. I think what the great guitarists would do is to try and end a chord with a tension-creating note to release with following chord. Sometimes this can be a an accidental and sometimes it can't. For a strong tension-release effect it's the easiest to use an accidental that's a half step away from a note in the following chord.

I'll try to explain with an example (A crappy one, I must say):


Let's take a C - Dm - F - G7 progression which is in C

C - Dm - F - G7
---------------|-----------14-|-13---------14-|-15-------12-|
-13------14-|-15-----------|------------------|----------------|
---------------|---------------|-------------------|---------------|
---------------|---------------|-------------------|---------------|
---------------|---------------|-------------------|---------------|
---------------|---------------|-------------------|---------------|

The second note in the first bar, a Db leads to the D of the Dm chord and the D note in the second bar. In that same bar the F# leads to the F chord and note of the third bar. The F# of the third bar resolves in the G and the E of the fourth bar will lead to the C when the progression is repeated.

With a bit of practice and creativity you can do a lot with this principle.
#18
To richieJovie
Suck it...
Do the right thing and leave this thread, cos your being a ****ing retard.

To Franky:

Cheers that helps, but what if I do a 4 bour progression. C C G G.
If I use the ionian mode.
Then what do I use, say i want to chuck an accidental on the second beat of the second C chord. What could I use and where would I get it from?

To Everyone else:

Well, Secondary dominants are relatively easy to understand,

But still if i am soloing, where would I pull my accidentals from?

Is there some kind of rule, or do they just come from nowhere?
Last edited by Lum at Mar 10, 2008,
#19
Quote by Lum
Well, Secondary dominants are relatively easy to understand,

But still if i am soloing, where would I pull my accidentals from?

Is there some kind of rule, or do they just come from nowhere?


In soloing over secondary dominants, the leading tone is the accidental. As in ii-V in C, the F# implies a D7 in Gmaj. Is that what you were asking? or just soloing in general?
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#20
Your accidentals would come from the non chord tone in the secondary dominant chord you're using. You can pretty much play what you want as along as you can get it to be theoretically logical.
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#21
Quote by Lum
To richieJovie
Suck it...
Do the right thing and leave this thread, cos your being a ****ing retard.

To Franky:

Cheers that helps, but what if I do a 4 bour progression. C C G G.
If I use the ionian mode.
Then what do I use, say i want to chuck an accidental on the second beat of the second C chord. What could I use and where would I get it from?

To Everyone else:

Well, Secondary dominants are relatively easy to understand,

But still if i am soloing, where would I pull my accidentals from?

Is there some kind of rule, or do they just come from nowhere?


Hey Lum, im not sure if you know this but the term accidental refers to notation.

"An accidental is a musical notation symbol used to raise or lower the pitch of a note from that indicated by the key signature." - Wiki

accidentals

I think I know what you mean though. Your talking about throwing in some chromatic tones, rather than just playing notes from the diatonic scale?

If so those chromatic tones can be used to embellish a melody by adding a brief tension that generally resolves back to a diatonic note (often a chord tone). So its not really about where they come from. Your not really getting them from some other scale.... your still in the key of C ( based on your example)..... your just creating tension, by playing a note not in the key.... and then resolving that tension when you reach a note that is in key.

Example over a C chord:
red notes = chromatic notes

---------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------5--4--5--------------------
---------------------2-----------------5--------------5----------------
---------2--5-4-5-----5--3--2--5---------------------------------
-----3--------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------

again, in this case, the chromatics tones (which would be notated with accidentals) are just embellishing the melody. Their is no need to analyze them beyond that.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 10, 2008,
#22
Quote by mercedesisbenz
Your accidentals would come from the non chord tone in the secondary dominant chord you're using. You can pretty much play what you want as along as you can get it to be theoretically logical.
Wait up, accidentals and non-chord tones are two different things. People always seem to get these two terms confused. Just thought I'd put in a warning.

And I thought I'd also add(after following this thread) that accidental is composition term - you don't really "play" accidentals. You write them. Thought there may have been some confusion in that arena as well. EDIT: woops, didn't read the last post, GuitarMunky's got me covered.
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Last edited by KryptNet at Mar 10, 2008,
#25
Quote by Infatuation
if you are in C and you add some F#'s then the key would change to G


No, you'd be in C with some F#s added.
#26
Quote by Eirien
No, you'd be in C with some F#s added.


Or, potentially, C lydian.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#27
Oh rite, so its chromatic notes. The accidental is just the sharp or flat infront of the note. Got it.

Also I just wondere if I could take the notes from modes. Like If i played in C, could I tak an F# from lydian, or Bb from Mixolydian? Could I be clever and get an Eb from A locrian?
Or is the best way to just play through the chromatic scale and see what fits?

Secondary dominants understood, but do you have to modulate with them, or can you just throw them in?