#1
Hello. I have been playing guitar about 5 years, and singing for maybe 1 year. I practice a lot. I have a pretty nice electric guitar but I prefer acoustic. My practice includes playing/singing covers usually by the Foo Fighters or John Mayer. I can play and sing "Your Body is a Wonderland" pretty well and "Everlong." Also I have a long list of cover songs I can play. I'm trying to constantly learn new songs and at the same time make my own. I tend to write everything down. In school (I'm in 10th grade) I am usually writing down lyrics. Also I write down most of the riffs or chords that sound well together. I haven't put together a full length original song yet. On electric I can solo well. My solo's sound bluesy from using major or minor pentatonic and mixing it up with mixolydian. I think I'm okay at it. I try to sound like John Mayer but I end up sounding different. I was thinking about putting some video's up on youtube of my soloing and singing/playing but I dont have a video camera or webcam. Well anyway I plan to make my own songs soon but I'm sort of a perfectionist so its hard work for me. Maybe when I get together 10 full length original songs I will post them on youtube. I really want to get a career in music and maybe, I don't know, make an album or something. It's really my only interest in life other than people and nature (that was sorta random). Anyway... I would appreciate some advice on whether or not I'm going in the right direction to eventually have a career. Also, how do you start a career professionally? I'm sorta lost and confused. Thanks.
#2
Depends on what you want to do. Here is something I posted in another thread...

1. Be competent on your instrument. You don't need to be Malmsteen. Just competent.
2. Be sensitive to the big picture. Play with taste, and know when you are (and aren't) in tune and in time, and not too loud. Let others have their space too.
3. Good songs and a good singer are way more important than who can shred faster.
4. If you want to get signed, be prepared to play the game of 'the young and the pretty.'
5. Relationships are critical - don't be a jerk. Not to your bandmates, people in other bands, promoters, fans, etc. You never know who is going to show up where, and if you kicked them in the balls at some point, you can bet the pigeons will come home to roost. People are more likely to help you (or take you into their band) if they like you.
6. Be reliable and conduct yourself professionally. Show up on time for rehearsals, and have your homework done. Don't get loaded at practice or gigs.
7. Common interests and goals are way more important than finding the best players to play with.
8. Know your limits. If you can't play Dream Theater, then don't. You'll just piss people off because their time is being wasted.
9. Be prepared to work. Rehearsals, homework, putting up posters, calling clubs and promoters, maintaining a website, designing/ordering merch, contacting media and creating awareness, recording, etc. It can easily become a full-time job if you let it.... and it should be a full time job if you want to make a career out of it.
10. Check your ego at the door.

Notice that it's not really about how good you are as a player, as much as it is about personal/social skills?


Just to add to that.... as a professional performing musician, it is all about taking on any job you can that will help pay the bills and developing contacts and building relationships along the way. (contacts = people skills!) The most valued session players got to where they are by building their name through experience and connections.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 9, 2008,
#4
If you mean teaching as in teaching privately in your home, that is, for many professional musicians, one of their income streams. They'll do that in addition to everything I suggested above. In and of itself, it is just like any self-employment venture - it can be good money but you really have to hustle to make it so.

If you mean teaching in a school, then the money and the job security (for the most part) and everything else is there. It is a very demanding path in terms of becoming qualified to do it. You'll need good enough marks in high school to get into university. If you want to do music in university, you'll also need your theory, ear training, and a high level of performance in classical or jazz to get into the program also. You'll also need high enough marks in university to get into teachers' college. (about 80% average in a lot of areas)

Take note of this, though, if you are considering teaching in a school. If you do not feel like you are 'called' to do it.... if you are doing it for the income and the holidays.... unless you genuinely feel that teaching is what you want to do.... DON'T DO IT! It will eat you alive. Besides, you can make more money doing other things that don't involve half of the challenges that a day of teaching presents.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Quote by mikeman
Hello. I have been playing guitar about 5 years, and singing for maybe 1 year. I practice a lot. I have a pretty nice electric guitar but I prefer acoustic. My practice includes playing/singing covers usually by the Foo Fighters or John Mayer. I can play and sing "Your Body is a Wonderland" pretty well and "Everlong." Also I have a long list of cover songs I can play. I'm trying to constantly learn new songs and at the same time make my own. I tend to write everything down. In school (I'm in 10th grade) I am usually writing down lyrics. Also I write down most of the riffs or chords that sound well together. I haven't put together a full length original song yet. On electric I can solo well. My solo's sound bluesy from using major or minor pentatonic and mixing it up with mixolydian. I think I'm okay at it. I try to sound like John Mayer but I end up sounding different. I was thinking about putting some video's up on youtube of my soloing and singing/playing but I dont have a video camera or webcam. Well anyway I plan to make my own songs soon but I'm sort of a perfectionist so its hard work for me. Maybe when I get together 10 full length original songs I will post them on youtube. I really want to get a career in music and maybe, I don't know, make an album or something. It's really my only interest in life other than people and nature (that was sorta random). Anyway... I would appreciate some advice on whether or not I'm going in the right direction to eventually have a career. Also, how do you start a career professionally? I'm sorta lost and confused. Thanks.

You can go in any number of directions. What would you like to do? Be a performer? A producer? An engineer? A teacher? Ridiculously famous? Be more specific with what you want to do and we can offer better advice
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#6
Quote by BigFatSandwich
You can go in any number of directions. What would you like to do? Be a performer? A producer? An engineer? A teacher? Ridiculously famous? Be more specific with what you want to do and we can offer better advice

Performer, producer and ridiculously famous on my part, enlighten me now please?
#7
Quote by axemanchris
you'll also need your theory, ear training, and a high level of performance in classical or jazz to get into the program also.
I think all aspiring pro guitarists should learn that.

Quote by axemancrhis
Take note of this, though, if you are considering teaching in a school. If you do not feel like you are 'called' to do it.... if you are doing it for the income and the holidays.... unless you genuinely feel that teaching is what you want to do.... DON'T DO IT! It will eat you alive. Besides, you can make more money doing other things that don't involve half of the challenges that a day of teaching presents.
Thought I'm sure the TS is far from this decision, I must say I absolutely agree. Not from personal experience but from two ex-university guitar teachers that said it was the black-hole of their musical career.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#8
Quote by -Vogel-
Performer, producer and ridiculously famous on my part, enlighten me now please?

Performer:
Practice. Write good stuff and get out and play it. If people like you, they will keep coming back to see you. Eventually they will want to pay to see you. Start small and work your way up through the ranks. It takes hard work. Lots of it.

Producer:
Practice. If you want to become a better producer, learn everything you can about the art (and it is an art) and do it. Produce some songs. It's the only way to get better. Also, look up information related to audio engineering.

Ridiculously Famous:
It's like stepping up to bat and trying to hit a home run or stepping into a boxing ring and trying your hardest to land that knockout punch. If it happens, it happens, but if you make that your only goal, you're most likely going to walk away disappointed. It requires a lot of talent plus a lot of luck.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#9
Quote by axemanchris
If you mean teaching in a school, then the money and the job security (for the most part) and everything else is there. It is a very demanding path in terms of becoming qualified to do it. You'll need good enough marks in high school to get into university. If you want to do music in university, you'll also need your theory, ear training, and a high level of performance in classical or jazz to get into the program also. You'll also need high enough marks in university to get into teachers' college. (about 80% average in a lot of areas)

Take note of this, though, if you are considering teaching in a school. If you do not feel like you are 'called' to do it.... if you are doing it for the income and the holidays.... unless you genuinely feel that teaching is what you want to do.... DON'T DO IT! It will eat you alive. Besides, you can make more money doing other things that don't involve half of the challenges that a day of teaching presents.

CT


A couple of things I'd like to point out...

You don't need to be incredibly proficient in jazz or classical to get into every music program (I certainly didn't have to pass a test or anything of that sort). However, if you aren't proficient at either of those things, and can't distinguish yourself in the program any other way (through composition, research, high analytical skills or something along those lines) I'm not sure how far you could get.

You do make an excellent point about teaching though, which I've heard from several teachers: teaching isn't an option to fall back on if you just want to do "something" with music. Without a passion for teaching, you probably will start to hate it after a while, and the pay isn't that good to make up for that.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#10
I've been a teacher for ten years now. Eight of those years I have really and truly enjoyed. Ironically, the two that I have hated have been the ones I have spent teaching grade 7+8 instrumental music on rotary. I am counting the days until this damned year is over. (only 69 more teaching days!!)

At the best of times, you have an insanely busy day. Most days I don't have time for lunch. Sure, I could take a half hour out and eat, but then I'm half an hour later getting home, where I probably do work there anyways. You are constantly tending to the needs of others and putting their needs ahead of your own, which is exhausting. If you're cut out for it, it is worth it though.

At the worst of times, there is the defiance, apathy, lack of support from admin, lack of support from parents, (which in turn feeds further defiance and apathy), dealing with your personal belongings being vandalized (the back window of my van was smashed and the side got keyed), materials mischieviously and maliciously sabotaged (why the F*** do people steal mouthpieces for F** sakes?), spending hours writing notes or phoning parents to track down incomplete work that you know 80% of it won't get done anyways, despite your efforts, having lessons you went out of your way to try to make more exciting and engaging being thrown in your face (due largely to defiance and apathy issues), having autistic kids throw their shoes at you or kick you in the leg, and then being told to f-off for your efforts at the end of it all.

A lot depends on your assignment, the people that you teach, parental support within the community (though over-involved parents can be a pain), strong administrative support, and your willingness to work hard. The good news is that if one position totally sucks, there are other assignments in other schools in other communities that might suit you better. As I say, I have spent 80% of my teaching time really enjoying it, and fully expect that I will return to enjoying it again next year with a new assignment in a different school.

By comparison, my brother in law works at Toyota and makes about as much as I do. He gets almost as many holidays as I do, only he gets to choose when to take them. He has reasonably predictable hours, good benefits, reliable breaks and lunches, and doesn't have to put up with any of the crap I listed above. Go figure.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 10, 2008,
#11
Art = sacrifice no? Hope you get out of that zoo soon! EDIT: mouthpiece...probably has to do with weed.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#12
just to clarify, i should have been more specific... axemanchris, thats really cool that you are a music teacher, and i have learned alot from my music teachers at my school but i'm more interested in actually making albums in the singer songwriter/ rock genre. I dont know many people that good musicians who would want to start a legit rock band that suited my tastes and i'm not sure how to find them. Thats a different thread i guess.

I'm pretty sure to have a career, and make decent money you have to have a fan base and do shows and have a record company that supports you that will help you promote your records and such, but how do you get started with that exactly? What type of venue do you play to to get noticed by the record label guys? I'm willing to do anything really.

About the rock band, Is there maybe a guitar or music magazine to advertise in? I want to get involved in a band. Also can singing alot of covers get you noticed perhaps by other musicians? I'm still confused on getting started, knowing where to go, what to do, how to meet other musicians, who to talk to, etc etc. this isnt really a specific question im just looking for any useful information and thanks.

/rant
#13
Quote by KryptNet
Art = sacrifice no? Hope you get out of that zoo soon! EDIT: mouthpiece...probably has to do with weed.


Haha... yeah. End of June and I'll be officially transferred out of there. If only it could be sooner. Weed.... haha... round there, could well be.

@mikeman - best piece of advice is keep your options open. Statistically, the odds of you making a living off it for a duration of more than ten years is about a zillion to one. I mean, about 1/1000 bands get signed to anything resembling a major label deal. Of those probably 90% of them are done after one album. Now, you're looking at 1/10 000 of getting past record number one. Of those probably 90% of them are done within five years or so. Sure, go for it, because *someone* has to win the 1/100 000 lottery, but don't bank on it.

How to get there:

1. Don't waste time. The older you get, the less chance you'll make it. Once you hit about 30 you can probably forget it. Be young and beautiful or don't bother playing.
2. It's all about songs. Either become or hook up with - not the best musician out there- but the best songwriter out there. Make sure he/she fits criteria for 'young and beautiful.'
3. Make sure you have a good singer. Without that, you're screwed. Not just an okay singer.... a good singer.
4. Learn everything you can about the business. It's almost impossible to win if you don't know how to play.
5. People skills - meet as many people as you can and make friends. Become fully involved not just in your own band, but in the musical community as a whole. Be the person that everyone knows. Climb the social ladder, because knowing people WILL pay off. If you don't already live there, move to New York, LA, Nashville, Vancouver, London or wherever else the big industry players are. You won't meet Mutt Lange if you live in Idaho. Ever.
6. It's not how well you play your instrument as much as it is how well you play with people. Be good. Be very good. Don't worry about being awesome as much as worrying about being hooked up and involved.
7. Be prepared to make it a full-time job. If this is what you want, don't treat it as a hobby.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
Quote by axemanchris

At the worst of times, there is the defiance, apathy, lack of support from admin, lack of support from parents, (which in turn feeds further defiance and apathy), dealing with your personal belongings being vandalized (the back window of my van was smashed and the side got keyed), materials mischieviously and maliciously sabotaged (why the F*** do people steal mouthpieces for F** sakes?), spending hours writing notes or phoning parents to track down incomplete work that you know 80% of it won't get done anyways, despite your efforts, having lessons you went out of your way to try to make more exciting and engaging being thrown in your face (due largely to defiance and apathy issues), having autistic kids throw their shoes at you or kick you in the leg, and then being told to f-off for your efforts at the end of it all.


This sums up everything wrong with the public education system and why it should be eradicated. You shouldn't have to submit yourself to this type of torture for any amount of money/benefits.

EDIT: To stay on topic, I think the threadstarter should definitely get into a music college so as to really learn and understand music better; just hoping for a record contract someday that may never come despite your skill doesn't really appeal to me, but there are a variety of things that you could do with a degree, I believe.
Last edited by Paquijón at Mar 10, 2008,
#15
Hmm. I'm not sure college is right for me in terms of music education. I realy just wanna get out there. I know the skill involved.

Will singing covers get me noticed at all if I play local clubs in L.A. and such until I can get some good songs written and a band together? I'm sort of young for it but I can drive out there this summer when I'm not working.
#16
If your goal is to go down there and get noticed and meet people in the music community, it doesn't really matter. Do what you do best. It sounds like you want to be the writer/singer/guitarist. Write like crazy. Like, every day. If you want to make a living at it, it can't be a hobby. Develop your voice, and be honest with yourself as to whether your voice can stand beside other voices you hear on the radio every day. The competition is NOT your friends and the people at your school. The competition is Foo Fighters and Jimmy Eat World and Jack Johnson.

Funny these days that the radio is flooded with mediocre and average guitar players. The reason is that the focus is very much on the song still. Shredding is still out of fashion. Be good, but be versatile.

Play with as many people as you can, and as I say, get in the game if you want to play it. Not just sitting on the bench and being a waterboy, but actually being everywhere at once. Ubiquitous. Be the person that everybody knows, because if you are, then you'll know everybody. They'll introduce you, eventually, to the big players - the people you need to know to impress those at the top. Maybe the band won't be yours, but when Dave Grohl breaks his arm in a motorcycle accident, or when Brad Delson leaves Linkin Park over musical differences, they're gonna need someone to call up to play guitar, and they'll start with calling people they already know that will be able to do the job.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
so your 15 or 16 right now... you started this account in 2004, me thinks this is bad...
you were 11 or twelve when you started this account

anyways, axeman is right, if you make it good, if not than all well.
theres no foolproff way to do anything.
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#18
Quote by axemanchris
I've been a teacher for ten years now. Eight of those years I have really and truly enjoyed. Ironically, the two that I have hated have been the ones I have spent teaching grade 7+8 instrumental music on rotary.

I'm not surprised, 7-8 grade kids are usually such assholes these days
#19
The sad part is that more than half of them are really great kids. It's the very loud minority that ruins it for everyone.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
Quote by axemanchris
The sad part is that more than half of them are really great kids. It's the very loud minority that ruins it for everyone.

CT

That's what happens in a society where people have forgotten how to slow down and reflect on things :|
#21
You need to be considered hot to be famous, so if you're not, then you may as well give up on the whole singer/songwriter thing.

Not nice to hear, but life's unfair.

EDIT: it's not letting me post for some reason, so I'll just post my reply here.

Quote by KryptNet
Bob Dylan?


Today there is no way that Bob Dylan would become famous. Times are very different from the 60's.

EDIT 2: Oh, and also, Bob Dylan is such an amazing lyricist and I really doubt that some random person on a guitar forum on the internet (no offense) can even come close to him.
#22
Quote by CottageGuy
You need to be considered hot to be famous, so if you're not, then you may as well give up on the whole singer/songwriter thing.

Not nice to hear, but life's unfair.
Bob Dylan?
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#23
Quote by BigFatSandwich

Ridiculously Famous:
It's like stepping up to bat and trying to hit a home run or stepping into a boxing ring and trying your hardest to land that knockout punch. If it happens, it happens, but if you make that your only goal, you're most likely going to walk away disappointed. It requires a lot of talent plus a lot of luck.


I have to disagree here, it requires you to be able to play catchy, simple riffs, with catchy, simple lyrics, and have a £300 haircut.*

For a full demonstration of such 'talent' in action;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FcBnaLjxY4

I just hate Pete Wentz, mainly out of jealousy, women love him so much, and all he does is play roots
Quote by mynamesedson
I asked my son he said nothing but he just asked me he wants a psyachatrist (spelling?) Because he heard voices calling out his name. What a freak.



Control your life through insanity.


Igneuspentheism
#24
Quote by CottageGuy

Today there is no way that Bob Dylan would become famous. Times are very different from the 60's.


I was just going to mention that Dylan was pre-Buggles prophecy.

CT


(for anyone who didn't get that, it was the Buggles in about 1981 that originally declared that "Video Killed the Radio Star." The fact that they did that in 1981, just as MTV was just getting going, and MuchMusic wasn't on the air yet, etc. is really very prophetic. Scary prophetic.)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#25
Next September, I'm going to be going to the Bristol Institute of Modern Music - the one set up by the Brighton institute - to do a Professional Diploma in Modern Music. That'll take a year, and then I can go straight onto a BA. That'll give me a degree - and there are loads of places which will hire you if you have a degree, no matter what it's in - and the Institute has a load of contacts in the industry to get graduates work.

So if you can find a music college to get a recognised qualification in music, that could help you a lot.
#26
Quote by Insanity^2
I have to disagree here, it requires you to be able to play catchy, simple riffs, with catchy, simple lyrics, and have a £300 haircut.*

For a full demonstration of such 'talent' in action;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FcBnaLjxY4

I just hate Pete Wentz, mainly out of jealousy, women love him so much, and all he does is play roots

...and you don't think writing catchy riffs and catchy lyrics requires talent?

can't view the video right now cause I'm at work, but I'll check it when I get home.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#27
Quote by BigFatSandwich
Performer:
Practice. Write good stuff and get out and play it. If people like you, they will keep coming back to see you. Eventually they will want to pay to see you. Start small and work your way up through the ranks. It takes hard work. Lots of it.

Producer:
Practice. If you want to become a better producer, learn everything you can about the art (and it is an art) and do it. Produce some songs. It's the only way to get better. Also, look up information related to audio engineering.

Ridiculously Famous:
It's like stepping up to bat and trying to hit a home run or stepping into a boxing ring and trying your hardest to land that knockout punch. If it happens, it happens, but if you make that your only goal, you're most likely going to walk away disappointed. It requires a lot of talent plus a lot of luck.

This guy's got it right.
I would just like to add that for the producer part, it's a good idea to have your own studio, and for the being famous part, becoming famous is actualy about having the talent and then shouting the loudest to get yourself noticed without doing anything that will put your potential audience off you.
The best advice I could possibly give anyone who want's to 'make it' in the music biz is to take a business course that specialises in promotion.
#28
Quote by mikeman
just to clarify, . . .i'm more interested in actually making albums in the singer songwriter/ rock genre. . . . .

I'm pretty sure to have a career, and make decent money you have to have a fan base and do shows and have a record company that supports you that will help you promote your records and such


You absolutely DO NOT have to have a record company to make decent money. In fact I would suggest you are better off without a record deal unless you want to be a mainstream/pop artist.

These days singer/songwriters can do much better producing and promoting their own music. With today's technology, it's cheap and easy to produce a commercial quality release at home and sell it through direct sales or a simple distribution deal.

I have a friend who has actually turned down major-label deals in order to retain 100% control of his music. As it is he has sold over 25,000 copies of his first album through direct sales at shows, the Internet, and independent distribution. Instead of seeing a few cents per CD sold as he would from a record company, he sees about $14 profit on each direct sale, and half that on distributor sales. By his accounting, he'd have to sell 10 to 15 times (a quarter million or more) that many CDs to realize the same profits from a record deal.

Plus, he doesn't have to answer to anyone but himself (he's a solo artist).

My best advice: Perfect your craft, hone your playing skills, write some good material, record it yourself and put it out there. If you are good and want a record deal later on, there's nothing better to attract a label than proven record sales.
Last edited by Mathius Krunk at Mar 14, 2008,
#29
Sorry to ressurect this thread but...

Quote by Mathius Krunk
You absolutely DO NOT have to have a record company to make decent money. In fact I would suggest you are better off without a record deal unless you want to be a mainstream/pop artist.

These days singer/songwriters can do much better producing and promoting their own music. With today's technology, it's cheap and easy to produce a commercial quality release at home and sell it through direct sales or a simple distribution deal.

I have a friend who has actually turned down major-label deals in order to retain 100% control of his music. As it is he has sold over 25,000 copies of his first album through direct sales at shows, the Internet, and independent distribution. Instead of seeing a few cents per CD sold as he would from a record company, he sees about $14 profit on each direct sale, and half that on distributor sales. By his accounting, he'd have to sell 10 to 15 times (a quarter million or more) that many CDs to realize the same profits from a record deal.

Plus, he doesn't have to answer to anyone but himself (he's a solo artist).

My best advice: Perfect your craft, hone your playing skills, write some good material, record it yourself and put it out there. If you are good and want a record deal later on, there's nothing better to attract a label than proven record sales.


Wow. That is incredible. Can i please get more information on recording and distribution deals? Thanks.

I don't dislike pop. If you listen to early John Mayer stuff, it is basically just pop such as "wonderland" and "my stupid mouth." Now that he has become a household name he is making incredible blues songs like whats on his newest album. So once he became famous doing what is popular he has changed over to the more blues influenced sound and increased his popularity and wrote deeper more meaningful songs. I think starting out catchy and simple is the way to go, such as using cliche's in your chorus and simple chords. That way your songs are hard to forget. Writing good songs is difficult but something i aspire to do.


Quote by Mr.Cuddles
so your 15 or 16 right now... you started this account in 2004, me thinks this is bad...
you were 11 or twelve when you started this account

anyways, axeman is right, if you make it good, if not than all well.
theres no foolproff way to do anything.


whats wrong with that? I've been playing guitar since then so this site was relavent to me as a guitarist.
#30
Quote by mikeman
Sorry to ressurect this thread but...


Wow. That is incredible. Can i please get more information on recording and distribution deals? Thanks.
I know you were asking someone else but I'll blurt out my opinion anyway. "Everything You'd Better Know About the Record Industry" by Kashif. It's a tacky book title i know, but it is the standard Music Business textbook of many schools including The Institute Of Audio Research.

It pretty much covers everything. Highly recommend it.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination