#1
Hey does any one know of any sites that show you how to adjust a truss rod and the intonation step by step or anything helpful?

Thanks
Feelin the Blues


"The Blues are a simple music and I'm a simple man. But the Blues aren't a science, the Blues can't be broken down like a mathematics. The Blues are a mystery, and mysteries are never as simple as they look" - BB King
#2
For the Truss Rod.
http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/trussrods.htm
or
http://www.athensmusician.net/archive/2001-05-01_geneimbody1.shtml

My advice.
Its really a simple procedure, just go slow when tightening the rod. Start by giving it 1/4 turns only when starting out, and work your way up, or down until you get the feel you want in the neck, because there is some personal preference to it. Try if possible to adjust it with the strings on, so you know how the tension is acting on the neck, and every few turns re-tune.

And for the intonation
http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/intonate.htm

Nice avatar by the way. SRV is my hero
#3
cool thanks
Feelin the Blues


"The Blues are a simple music and I'm a simple man. But the Blues aren't a science, the Blues can't be broken down like a mathematics. The Blues are a mystery, and mysteries are never as simple as they look" - BB King
#4
Quote by muff diver
For the Truss Rod.
http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/trussrods.htm
or
http://www.athensmusician.net/archive/2001-05-01_geneimbody1.shtml

My advice.
Its really a simple procedure, just go slow when tightening the rod. Start by giving it 1/4 turns only when starting out, and work your way up, or down until you get the feel you want in the neck, because there is some personal preference to it. Try if possible to adjust it with the strings on, so you know how the tension is acting on the neck, and every few turns re-tune.

And for the intonation
http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/intonate.htm

Nice avatar by the way. SRV is my hero


Pretty bogus advice there. A truss rod isn't designed to be adjusted that much at one time, and it's sole purpose in life is to compensate for the strings natural inward pull on the neck, not to intonate or correct poor action. For instance, you don't make an adjustment on the truss, then re-tune, then crank on the truss again, then re-tune. Keep doing that and pretty soon you'll have either a stripped out truss rod or a completely unplayable guitar. Truss rods need tlc to perform properly. A little dab of oil on the nut end won't hurt. 1/4 turn MAX is all you should EVER do at a time, and a rest/settling in period overnight is mandatory. You also need to know which way to turn the truss so that you get the right results. Some push, some pull.
Truss rods are always adjusted with the strings on and tuned up, unless major work is being performed on the neck like replacing the fretboard or a neck reset. Seasonal truss rod adjustments are usually all that are required for most guitars, while some may not ever need tweaking. IT'S NOT A TUNER!