#1
Hey ive got this guitar its a Rockwood and I think it needs some repair. When a tune a string and go to the other strings to tune the first string I tuned loses tune. I thought maybe someone could help me out with this problem. I was thinking maybe I need some new machine heads or something. Any help would be appreciated Thanks
Gear:

Guitars:
ESP Ltd Ex-50
Jackson DK2M(Coming Soon)
Amp:
Laney Mxd120
Accessories:
Digitech Rp100 Effects Pedal
#4
Well I do have a tremolo bridge dont know what you mean by floating :S im a bit of a noob at tremolos
Gear:

Guitars:
ESP Ltd Ex-50
Jackson DK2M(Coming Soon)
Amp:
Laney Mxd120
Accessories:
Digitech Rp100 Effects Pedal
#5
^he's suggesting that if your bridge is lifted, or not balanced, the strings wont hold a tune.


if it's raised, then flip the guitar over and tighten the screws in the trem cavity. add a spring if necessary.

level the bridge and try tuning up.
Jenneh

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#6
Try tuning the strings from the middle out. Some guitars are touchy when it comes to the strings being in balance on the neck. Try tuning the D and G strings first, then A, then B, then low E, then high E last. This'll keep the tension balanced across the neck.
#7
Are you putting on a new set of strings? It helps to stretch the strings after you've gotten them all put on. Reason is that there will ALWAYS be some natural bend in the neck as you tune. What to do: On the initial tuning after install, I always tune stretch and tune the strings, one at a time, starting from the bottom string, and I tune them just a tad high. Why? Because I know that the neck bend is going to happen, so if I compensate just a little on the first tuning, I'll will not have to go through so many re=tunings. When I get done, I go back and check the low one again, and retune it, stretching the string is I do, until it gets close to right. Repeat the same procedure a couple of more times, i.e. stretch and tune, until you find that they are all on pitch. You're done!

This procedure is a MUST, especially when you have a gig that night!!!

Hope this helps you.

P.S. If you have a bigsby, or whammy bar of some kind, you will have to add one more step to each iteration of the procedure: jiggle the bigsby up and down just a bit, in order to help the string settle in at the nut and bridge.

P.P.S. If you have one of those locking/microtuning systems on your guitar (may God help you!). Please please...take only one string off at a time, get that up to pitch with the others, then take off the next string...or you may be at it for 45 minutes to an hour!!!

joey45
Last edited by Joey45 at Mar 10, 2008,