#1
Hello all, im currently looking at the Ibanez SR series - the SR900 in particular, it has everything i'm looking for. The only thing is that it has active electronics - i was wondering what the advantages of active electronics were over passive. I was also wondering how often i would have to replace the battery, does the bass go completely dead when the battery runs out?

thanks!
#2
actives diminish as the batteries lose power,but have more of everything until then. i prefer the reliability of passives,but it is all up to what you want with the guitar. batteries go dependent of the power draw of that specific pickup.from days to months
#3
you need to be tighter when you play on actives because they pick up a lot more than passives but they sound great.
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#4
i see! i would far rather have passives too but I can't really find anything that i like with a slim neck and 24 frets as well as passive pickups.

thanks for the help!
#5
For an idea of the battery draw, my active electronics in my Fender lasted on one battery for over 7 months and I am not careful about unplugging my bass when I don't play. Many the tine was when I left it in overnight and it still chugged along nicely.

As for the difference between active and passive, it's all in the sound. I find that actives are like Barqs rootbeer and passives are like A&W rootbeer. Actives have a more invigorating flavour that's more in your face that rely on the heavy spices and caffeine (active EQ controls). Passives on the other hand have a more smooth full flavour, like A&W, that more rely on the natural flavours of the root (woods).

Of course neither of these rootbeers have any thing on the Sobey's in-house brand of 2005. God that was a good rootbeer. But alas, it has no correlation to bass.

I swear if you try a Barqs followed driectly by an A&W you'll know exactly what I mean.
#6
I think active basses have more presence, but in turn, lose a bit of character to passive basses. Kinda like people at a party - the loudmouth party animals aren't always the deepest folks in the world. However, at a party, who do YOU want to be? The party animal, or the dude sipping on a beer with a cowboy hat and a cool tattoo? OK, not a great example, but you know what I mean. Band settings make a world of difference, as well.
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#7
I Converted to actives some years ago after a lifetime of passives, for me passives are the tops.
One major thing is that to get the best out of actives and do justice you have to play through a decent setup; idealy 15"+ 2/4x10" and a HF unit; otherwise all the benefits of the actives will be wasted.
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#8
Quote by thefitz
I think active basses have more presence, but in turn, lose a bit of character to passive basses. Kinda like people at a party - the loudmouth party animals aren't always the deepest folks in the world. However, at a party, who do YOU want to be? The party animal, or the dude sipping on a beer with a cowboy hat and a cool tattoo? OK, not a great example, but you know what I mean. Band settings make a world of difference, as well.



I wanna be the dude in the cowboy hat for sure.
#9
Quote by jazz_rock_feel


...As for the difference between active and passive, it's all in the sound. I find that actives are like Barqs rootbeer and passives are like A&W rootbeer. Actives have a more invigorating flavour that's more in your face that rely on the heavy spices and caffeine (active EQ controls). Passives on the other hand have a more smooth full flavour, like A&W, that more rely on the natural flavours of the root (woods).

Of course neither of these rootbeers have any thing on the Sobey's in-house brand of 2005. God that was a good rootbeer. But alas, it has no correlation to bass.

I swear if you try a Barqs followed driectly by an A&W you'll know exactly what I mean.


gotta love that analogy! cheers!
#10
Quote by Marshall46
i see! i would far rather have passives too but I can't really find anything that i like with a slim neck and 24 frets as well as passive pickups.

This is a very interesting observation. We'll ignore the quip about the slim neck but I will say that 24-fret passives are a rare enough bird. Yeah, there exist an entire line of 24 fret active/passive switchable basses (Warwicks), but I'm going to go on the record and say that music that requires 24 frets on a fingerboard would also be very well suited for active electronics. Like a sports car with a convertable roof.

But other advice that was given should be emphasized - actives are clearer and do pick up more noise, and make sure you have an amp setup capable of covering most of the audio spectrum (especially the treble), otherwise you're "missing the point" of actives.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#11
Quote by jazz_rock_feel

I find that actives are like Barqs rootbeer and passives are like A&W rootbeer. Actives have a more invigorating flavour that's more in your face that rely on the heavy spices and caffeine (active EQ controls). Passives on the other hand have a more smooth full flavour, like A&W, that more rely on the natural flavours of the root (woods).

Of course neither of these rootbeers have any thing on the Sobey's in-house brand of 2005. God that was a good rootbeer. But alas, it has no correlation to bass.

I swear if you try a Barqs followed driectly by an A&W you'll know exactly what I mean.


Jazz, That is the best analogy I've heard in a long time, from now on we can all call ourselves A&W or Barqs people in the forum and know exactly what kind of tonal preferences everyone has.... and now I really want to go drink some rootbeer, do they even make Barqs rootbeer anymore?
#12
As has been said, actives have more control over tone. I very much like the idea of the bass being transparent enough so I can find a tone for any, or most, situations. Some people like the idea of having that characteristic tone that passives give. Someone can listen to their recording and say "hey, that's a Fender P bass right there." I'd personally prefer people to say "hey, that's Delirium's tone". I'd much rather have my own voice.

But that's just me. I've used passives in the past and loved them to bits, but in my current situation, I need an active.
#13
I shall always stand by my current setup of passive pickups with an active preamp, which can be bypassed (making full passive).

I find this combination gives the flexability of actives, with the character of passive pickups. It really allows the timbre of the bass to shine through, while still giving that extra punch and fexibility of active.
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#14
Quote by dullsilver_mike
Jazz, That is the best analogy I've heard in a long time, from now on we can all call ourselves A&W or Barqs people in the forum and know exactly what kind of tonal preferences everyone has.... and now I really want to go drink some rootbeer, do they even make Barqs rootbeer anymore?


Yeah, Coke makes it. It's not the greatest but it's still around.
#15
i prefer A&W, but enjoy an occasional Barq's.
my current rig is passive, and i like it just fine. but other than the battery issue, which is minor, i really don't have a serious issue against active.
#16
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Of course neither of these rootbeers have any thing on the Sobey's in-house brand of 2005. God that was a good rootbeer. But alas, it has no correlation to bass.

Active/passive switch?
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#17
I have two active basses and two passive basses. On the whole I prefer active basses - you get a versatility passive tone controls don't have. I bought both the active basses about a year ago and changed the battery in both a couple of months ago - battery usage isn't a big deal. You can install an active/passive switch and have both tones available but if you're used to having your passive tone control maxed all the time then you'll want to add a capacitor.

I've got really used to having onboard active EQ now and really miss it when playing passive basses.
#18
hey, i think peavey grind basses might be passive, what IS rootbeer? is it, like, ginger beer?
#19
Quote by jimRH7
hey, i think peavey grind basses might be passive, what IS rootbeer? is it, like, ginger beer?

You don't know what root beer is? You're missing out:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root_beer

It's kinda similar to ginger beer.

As to the active vs. passive debate, I like both. I have an active bass (a schecter) and a passive one (an american jazz) and I like both of them. However, as much as I like to have the flexibility of active controls on the bass, I think I prefer the sound of my passive jazz. However, that might just be because I like the jazz better. But a passive/active switch is the way to go if possible.

Edit: Also, battery life really isn't a concern, the battery in my schecter hasn't been changed for at least 8 months or so, but I am sure to unplug the instrument cable when I'm done playing.
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#21
Quote by thefitz
I think active basses have more presence, but in turn, lose a bit of character to passive basses. Kinda like people at a party - the loudmouth party animals aren't always the deepest folks in the world. However, at a party, who do YOU want to be? The party animal, or the dude sipping on a beer with a cowboy hat and a cool tattoo? OK, not a great example, but you know what I mean. Band settings make a world of difference, as well.

I want to be the guy sipping his drink silently but i prefer active electronics.
It gives me (and everybody who NEEDS it) much more versatility and allow me great changes of the tone during songs. That's why i prefer active basses.
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