#1
Hi all,

I've been playing for about 9 months, no lessons. I have a lot of trouble with keeping beat, or even keeping it in my head for that matter.

I started playing the lead to Fade to black on Saturday. I also discovered Reaper for recording and used a rythem track I just grabed from Guitar pro 5.

Obviously I dont have Kirks speed, and some screw ups that slowed it making the drums kick in at the end where I should have been done. I did use the software to edit a bit of gaps but no speed changes with software, just white space between sections.

Have a listen and don't be too hard on me but let me know if its really bad for 9 months and I should sign up for lessons

http://www.extendedtools.com/fb.mp3
Last edited by warped_1 at Mar 10, 2008,
#2
yeah, thats pretty bad dude, but you don't necessarily need lessons, just more practice. You starting going into the lead way too early and completely masacured the end. listen to Fade to Black more and develop a sense of timing.
Gear:

- Epiphone Les Paul Standard
- Saga LP Copy
- Godin Seagull Acoustic
- Roland Cube 60
- Fender G-Dec
- Jim Dunlop Crybaby
- Guitar Rig 2
#3
Quote by Floydian45
yeah, thats pretty bad dude, but you don't necessarily need lessons, just more practice. You starting going into the lead way too early and completely masacured the end. listen to Fade to Black more and develop a sense of timing.


Plus, you have guitar pro, slow that bad boy down and play along with both guitars until you can mimic the lead solid enough to play without listening to it; Then as you get better, speed it up gradually.

You slaughtered it, sorry.

Good Luck, Bro.
#4
Sllooooooowwwwwww dooooowwwwwwwwnn. Perfect Practice makes perfect. your obviously struggling with the song at full speed so slow it down and nail small sections of the song rather than trying to memorize the whole thing. I'M talking 2 MAYBE 3 bars but id recommend just drilling those two bars into ur head over and over and over until u have it right. with accuraccy come speed (more cheesy guitar mantras to come). as far as being on pace, whatever that means, everyone will progress at different speeds there is no time table for guitar. I'd recommend getting a guitar teacher. its possible to learn all sorts of **** and become a great guitar player with the internet and books and so many tools at there but having someone to really point you in the right direction is a great idea. taking lessons even for a few months can dramtically improve your playing.
#5
hmm, I started in where my GP5 tab did. I will go back to the real song. I know its masacured, but at 9 months in is that way behind for something I just started playing??
#6
Quote by warped_1
hmm, I started in where my GP5 tab did. I will go back to the real song. I know its masacured, but at 9 months in is that way behind for something I just started playing??


Depends what you've been practicing and how often.

It's not about months or years; It's about hours per day.

If you've been practicing simple songs for 20 minutes, 3 days a week, don't expect to pot one of Kirk's solos.
But if you've been pushing yourself, you should be seeing results, or at least the ability to work through the solo slowly. Make sure you focus on one section at a time. Completely Nail one section of the solo, then move to the next riff, you can't take it all at once.

Just take it slow, use the GP5 slow down tool and build up slowly listening to the lead guitar as you're playing.

You'll learn almost anything if you keep hard at it.
I know you've got it in you, you just need to make it hit the surface.
Last edited by -Collapse- at Mar 10, 2008,
#7
Gotcha. I travel 60%+ of the time for work. I can bring my guitar with me when I do one trip a month but the other 2 trips I fly. So its hard to push myself because its like my fingers reset after a week of not playing. I've been practicing only rythem up till this. I opened this tab to learn the rythem and thought what the hell, lets try the lead so its really my first one.
#8
Quote by warped_1
hmm, I started in where my GP5 tab did. I will go back to the real song. I know its masacured, but at 9 months in is that way behind for something I just started playing??


It depends on how often you practice. I would almost say taking on lead stuff at 9 months in a little too fast. Don't bite off more than you can chew. Just listen to the song more and break the solo down to 2 or 3 bars and practice vigorusly until you have those bars down, then add another three and so on. By the way, if what you said was true about the GP5 tab, whoever tabbed that was really, really wrong.
Gear:

- Epiphone Les Paul Standard
- Saga LP Copy
- Godin Seagull Acoustic
- Roland Cube 60
- Fender G-Dec
- Jim Dunlop Crybaby
- Guitar Rig 2
#9
Yeah, the lead started right before the first drumkit kick so did I.

I definetly get the point on slowing it down and breaking it up. I've done that on some rythem stuff and nailed it but then a few days later of not playing it it's like starting over again. Is that normal and gets better with time? or something that you either got it or not, you know born with
#10
Quote by warped_1
Yeah, the lead started right before the first drumkit kick so did I.

I definetly get the point on slowing it down and breaking it up. I've done that on some rythem stuff and nailed it but then a few days later of not playing it it's like starting over again. Is that normal and gets better with time? or something that you either got it or not, you know born with


I've learned things and forgot them fairly quickly before.
You'll forget any skill if you don't keep at it.
I believe it's how much you keep playing it after you learn it.
It would be best to learn things you'll love to play, so you play it over and over until you're almost tired of hearing it. Haha
#11
From what I hear of it, you seem to have got all the right notes but all in the wrong places. Your playing is clear, but like everyone else has said, you do need to slow down, examine the actual rhythm of the part, and keep practising until you get it.
#12
Yeah, don't go by other people's progress as a guide line. Some people if they try can pickup things very quickly. Some people don't but it doesn't mean you won't be as good as them, keep trying dude =]
#13
Quote by DavidXN
From what I hear of it, you seem to have got all the right notes but all in the wrong places. Your playing is clear, but like everyone else has said, you do need to slow down, examine the actual rhythm of the part, and keep practising until you get it.


I hear yeah and will do. Keeping rythm is so fricken hard for me.
I'm sure the rhythm will get better with practice being I just started playing it 2 days ago and its my first lead attempt so it will improve in that area. The speedier part will take a lot of practice for me for sure. I'll play it entirely slow mostly but I will still try those parts as fast as I can a few times a day to see if I have progressed. Thats another reason why I recorded that part, to compare later down the road. I found that reaper program yesterday and its pretty damn good software.

It's rough not having any guitar friends to learn from and sponge off of. Thats the main reason I posted it to get any feedback. From the sounds of things, an instructor is a pretty good idea to get me going more in the right direction. I think I'm just worried how to pick the right instructor. What questions should I ask them to get the right fit? I want to interview them first haha.
#14
I'm self taught. All you need is someone to tell you the bad habits and then you're off. All you need to know is what you need to learn.

Theory, solid picking style, scales, all that good stuff. There isnt anything you can't find on the internet.
#15
Quote by Ze_Metal
I'm self taught. All you need is someone to tell you the bad habits and then you're off. All you need to know is what you need to learn.

Theory, solid picking style, scales, all that good stuff. There isnt anything you can't find on the internet.


True that.
I'm also self taught, just picked things up from songs I wanted to learn at first; stared at how artists play and the way they do things, and I saved a load of money. =]

I'm not saying self taught is the best way, but I'm glad I did it, I feel much freer in style now because I focused in on what I wanted to do, not what a teacher wanted because it's his lesson plan.
#16
Quote by Ze_Metal
I'm self taught. All you need is someone to tell you the bad habits and then you're off. All you need to know is what you need to learn.

Theory, solid picking style, scales, all that good stuff. There isnt anything you can't find on the internet.



I haven't looked at theory yet. I have been trying to play songs more than anything so I will look at some of the practice guides here at UG. Since I travel so much, the internet is my best resource but Im thinking maybe a lesson or two a month wouldn't hurt.
#17
Quote by -Collapse-
True that.
I focused in on what I wanted to do, not what a teacher wanted because it's his lesson plan.


Thats what I am afraid of with paying for lessons. I'm 33 years old with young kids taking much of my time and travel way too much so I am not going to be in a band or gigging anything. I kind of just want to do what I want to keep the passion boiling.

Guitar has replaced computer work/study and gaming as my hobby. I just got burned out of too much tech and needed something else. I don't want Guitar to turn into that also.