#1
well i was wondering since the newer framus cobras are made in korea i believe and no longer PTP like they were, which doesnt matter much to me since it sounds fantastic.

anyways i read that the dragon is PTP and the cobra, to my knowledge, isnt. which is weird. so is this person wrong or do they have an older version. are both the newer versions cost efficient PCB made in korea?...or elsewhere and not in germany?

just something i wanted cleared up. no big deal, just something i wanted to know.
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#2
Cobra and Dragon are nearly identical, save for a few resistors and caps in the tone stack. The older models had the flying leads, but the Cobra is just a hotrodded version of the Dragon. They even had the same PCB for a while. When they changed production technique on the Cobra, they did for the Dragon too.

They were never PTP however. Point to point is wired without a circuit board. They always had circuit boards, but they used to have flying leads from the pots and input jacks, and chassis mounted power tube sockets in the first revisions. PTP isn't necessarily the end all be all though. As long as good parts are used, good traces, the PCB is thick and doesn't flex, and parts are off the board, it can be just as good as PTP, and actually more consistent in the builds. Flying leads to pots, jacks, and tube sockets is an important one IMO however. If a control gets banged or damaged, it won't take out any parts that way, and it's a lot easier to replace. Since those parts like pots and jacks get used a lot, there is some mechanical stress, which makes chassis mounted more durable

FYI, there are some really cool mods people have figured out, that will allow you to swap voicings between them. A friend of mine on HC actually figured out all the parts that need to be changed, and modded his Cobra to have the Dragon lead channel. He liked the Cobra crunch channel better so he kept it. The mods work the other way too however, so you could basically make any combo you wanted.
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#3
dam dude you are the UG hero. that answered my question perfectly. thanks a lot.

cleared up to the max (lol lame but true).

im not interested in Modding my cobra when i get it tho. i like the cobra sound better than the dragon.

so they no longer have flying leads on the amps now? and the power tubes are mounted right on the board? isnt that dangerous? like it could melt the board lol?
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#4
Quote by giternator
dam dude you are the UG hero. that answered my question perfectly. thanks a lot.

cleared up to the max (lol lame but true).

im not interested in Modding my cobra when i get it tho. i like the cobra sound better than the dragon.

so they no longer have flying leads on the amps now? and the power tubes are mounted right on the board? isnt that dangerous? like it could melt the board lol?

np

Not really dangerous, the sockets are on top of the boards, and the tubes come up from the board, not hanging under it, so all the heat goes to the top of the tubes. It could be a problem if they were hanging under the board though, so don't run it upside down, lol. Some amps have them hanging, but they usually use ceramic sockets instead of plastic.

There are no flying leads anymore, every switch, pot, jack, etc... is mounted directly to the boards. The real problem is when you are changing powertubes or preamp tubes, and the board flexes, or a part fails. Since it's a PCB, things like traces and solder joints can separate if the board flexes. I have a friend on here who owns a Cobra, and actually had a solder joint go bad under the preamp tube socket when he was changing them, probably from pushing down on the board. His was actually one of the older revisions too, they never did have flying leads to the preamp tube sockets, just the powertube sockets. Now they are all PCB mounted however.
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Last edited by Erock503 at Mar 10, 2008,
#5
Quote by Erock503
np

Not really dangerous, the sockets are on top of the boards, and the tubes come up from the board, not hanging under it, so all the heat goes to the top of the tubes. It could be a problem if they were hanging under the board though, so don't run it upside down, lol. Some amps have them hanging, but they usually use ceramic sockets instead of plastic..

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#6
The biggest problems with PCB are that 1. If part of it is damaged, say a tube burns it up pretty good, the whole thing needs to be replaced. 2. It's easy to do a rush job with PCB. With PTP handwiring everything is done at a slower more meticulous pace. PCB allows someone to get that same job done in a lightning fast pace which can lead to sloppy work due to the lack of attention.

If PCB is inspected, tested, and basically to VHT or Mesa Boogie's standards you're in good shape.
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