#1
i am trying to figure out a way to record a demo for my band could anybody tell many any could cheap methods to record drums and get a halway decent sound i have a toneport for guitar bass and vocals it works pretty decent for that but i cannot find any decent way to record drums more than likely im guessing i will have to shell out 300 to 400 bucks at least to get a decent drum recording
#2
You can program the drums in your computer, then you got to have a drum program like drumkit from hell, and you can easely program the drums in guitarpro. then just transfer the midi file from guitarpro to drumkit from hell. and you've got a own session with drums.
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#3
Programed drums sound like ****...


If im not mistaken the toneports have mic inputs right? Buy two decent mic's and record through the toneport.It would be good enough for a demo,Just EQ it too your liking and thats pretty much it.
#4
Thanks but in probally wouldnt work for me i got the cheap ass 70 dollar toneport with one input i will probally have to find a could drum program for now till i can afford something better
#5
just mic up the drums throught the instrament ports. play with the mic positions for the best sound, it works ok for what your lookin to do.
Im gonna pistol whip the next guy that says shenanigans !!!!
#7
whenever i tried this before the bass drum sounded really bad and i got lots of bad sound it sounded terrible but i dont no maybe i can tweak it some more thanks ill give it a try
#8
Programmed drums can sound awesome. It depends entirely on the quality of the samples and the skill of the person programming them. Usually the problem is someone has pointed and clicked a really mechanical and stilted rhythm and is triggering second-rate samples, so it sounds crappy. Listen to the Pyromania album by Def Leppard. That's all sampled drums and the album sounds absolutely fantastic. Of course, it was done by Mutt Lange.....

A couple of things to help make them better:
-If you have something like a Roland drum module - even like this:


Of course, a high-quality electronic kit will give you even more options.

Actually play the parts on the pads or get a real drummer to play the parts on the pads. Do it to a click, and don't quantize anything. Just edit as required. You will maintain that human feel because it was done by a human!

-use real cymbals and hats. Use samples for the rest.

-Use dry samples and add processing as required. Part of the problem with samples is that they are too processed, and therefore don't sound natural.

-make sure your samples actually sound like real drums.

-make sure your pads are velocity sensitive, and that your software supports velocity layers. Assign slightly different samples to be played as dictated by how hard the pads are hit. Alternately, do this manually by adjusting velocities in your software.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 11, 2008,
#9
Quote by wes_jett2008
Programed drums sound like ****...


Completely false. Most drum machines sound a little different from your standard acoustic kit, but who would complain about having more sonic possibilities?
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#10
yes guitarpro has some decent sounding drums and i have heard people put some pretty could stuff together on there before but it will take me forever to figure it out maybe the drummer can though
#11
Quote by Svea_Trollblod
You can program the drums in your computer, then you got to have a drum program like drumkit from hell, and you can easely program the drums in guitarpro. then just transfer the midi file from guitarpro to drumkit from hell. and you've got a own session with drums.

More detail? I have Guitar Pro drum tracks I want to 'upgrade'.
-Gear-
Mesa Triple Rectifier---Bogner/Line6 SpiderValve---Orange PPC 4x12

-Pedalboard/Rackmount-
Alesis MidiVerb4--BBE SonicMaximizer 442--Ibanez TS9
Boss DD-3--Morley Mark Tremonti Wah

-Guitars-
Ibanez ART-100
Ibanez S-470
#12
Quote by Muphin
Completely false. Most drum machines sound a little different from your standard acoustic kit, but who would complain about having more sonic possibilities?



I dont mean they sound like ****...just that they sound like ****.There's usually no dynamics at all,most of the time programed drums just sound mechanical.But then again Im a drummer,So my views are alittle different then most.

Point is,If you want impressive drums/Beliveable drums...Use a real drummer.
#14
Quote by wes_jett2008
I dont mean they sound like ****...just that they sound like ****.There's usually no dynamics at all,most of the time programed drums just sound mechanical.But then again Im a drummer,So my views are alittle different then most.

Point is,If you want impressive drums/Beliveable drums...Use a real drummer.



http://www.myspace.com/meshuggah

Listen to shed

That whole album (catch 33) was done using drumkit from hell. Actually drumkit from hell was made with this drummer, for that album, using samples of his kit. im pretty sure those are impressive and believable drums.
#15
I use a PreSonus Inspire 1394 FireWire interface to plug in 4 drum mics. Two in the front inputs and two in the back RCA inputs (with adapters on the ends of the mics of course). The mics that I use are just the cheapish Radio Shack kind & with some EQ fixing I can get a pretty good sound. I'm saving up for some drum mic's though - that should improve the sound heaps.

I think the best thing you can do with what you've got is just stick the microphone about 4 feet away from the kit at about the height of the toms and hope for the best. Try a few positions too - like maybe with the microphone stand up as high as it can go with the mic pointed down towards the kit. You'll probably need to boost the right frequency so that the kick comes through in the mix, but it's definitely worth a try.

I wouldn't worry about having your demo's drums sounding un-human if you do decide to go with samples. It's just a demo. It's what you use to get your ideas out there. The people who matter will see past the bad quality if the music's good.
#16
Quote by wes_jett2008
I dont mean they sound like ****...just that they sound like ****.There's usually no dynamics at all,most of the time programed drums just sound mechanical.But then again Im a drummer,So my views are alittle different then most.

Point is,If you want impressive drums/Beliveable drums...Use a real drummer.


This is where programming skill and having decent software comes into play. The new e-drum kits have *very* sensitive pads to detect velocity differences between hits, and can trigger a vast number of samples to correspond to varying velocities. (called velocity layering - a drum sounds different if you hit it quietly, loudly, or somewhere in between, so you might have 3, 4, or 15 different velocity layers - each triggering a slightly different sample, based on how hard the pad is it for a very realistic response and performance.)

The pads are also quite sensitive now to *where* on the pad you are hitting. A drum sounds different hit on the edge as compared to at the center of the skin. Different samples are then triggered to accommodate for where you hit the pad.

They even respond to playing with brushes now!

The cymbal pads, similarly, detect whether you are playing on the edge, the bell, or wherever.

Now, if you're not playing a new e-kit, these are the things you have to take into account when programming within your software. Now, your software has to accommodate these velocity layers, and you might have a variety of *slightly* different snare sounds to simulate different velocities and places on the drum a drummer would hit. And then you would have to spend some time adjusting the velocity of various hits throughout each and every bar of your piece. A lot of software has a built-in "humanize" function which places the hits at slightly random positions ahead and/or behind the beat (as a real drummer would) to make it sound less mechanical.

And again, you have to have high quality samples.

It can be done, and can sound awesome, but it can also be a lot of work.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
Quote by wes_jett2008
Point is,If you want impressive drums/Beliveable drums...Use a real drummer.


Why should music have to be believable? It doesn't matter how the sound is made, as long as it sounds good to the listener. Drum machines can sound beautiful and impressive, have a listen to Aphex Twin's '4' or 'Girl/Boy Song' for some proof.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#18
Quote by Mattdreyer
http://www.myspace.com/meshuggah

Listen to shed

That whole album (catch 33) was done using drumkit from hell. Actually drumkit from hell was made with this drummer, for that album, using samples of his kit. im pretty sure those are impressive and believable drums.



I will admit that sounds good.Most of the programs i've used in the past have always sounded to blah...I have heard about Drumkit from hell though.If I was going the E-drums route I would use it and a real E-kit.Most of the free stuff on the web is crap.I guess I just hate seeing drums faked,If I could fake guitars and have it sound real I would probably have a record deal.
#19
our band has a micro BR 4 track and we just use the mic on that for recording the drums, hold it above the kit for better sound, maybe thats just cause the room we use but it works fine
Guitar - Fender Jaguar HH Special (Black)

Dunlop Crybaby GCB-95

Zoom GFX - 3


Amp - Marshall MG100DFX


Band - Not Half Right
(www.myspace.com/halfrightmusic)
#21
Quote by wes_jett2008
I will admit that sounds good.Most of the programs i've used in the past have always sounded to blah...I have heard about Drumkit from hell though.If I was going the E-drums route I would use it and a real E-kit.Most of the free stuff on the web is crap.I guess I just hate seeing drums faked,If I could fake guitars and have it sound real I would probably have a record deal.



Oooh, get you..
There is poetry in despair.
#22
Im still trying to figure out if that statement makes any sence.I'd feel pretty stupid if there is some program that will take tab and play it for you and sound real...other than GP.