#1
Im starting now and im learning some pentatonic scales, major and minor scales. My question is should I understand first how they are formed or do you think it's better if I just know by memory all the positions of the scale along the fretboard?

If you say the first option, tell me why is that so important to you. Thanks.
#2
Quote by symba05
Im starting now and im learning some pentatonic scales, major and minor scales. My question is should I understand first how they are formed or do you think it's better if I just know by memory all the positions of the scale along the fretboard?

If you say the first option, tell me why is that so important to you. Thanks.


Well Ive memorized the shapes all along the fret board, but it is probably better if you learn how they are formed.

EDIT- Because youll understand them better and you can form them any where on the fret board easily, oh and you probably wont get mixed up or even forget the shape on the certain frets.
The Snaggle Toothed Pirate
#3
Sure it's possible to just learn the positions, and you'll make some cool solo's with it. But really try to understand what notes you are playing. So try to play a note, and call it's name.

It will help you in finding the root notes in the patterns (the note that's the same as the name of the scale). If you could end your solo on a root note, it will sound complete.

Also, if you know the different notes or grades (don't know the english term), it will be much easier to learn the blues scale for instance. Which just adds a flatted fifth to the minor pentatonic scales. That way, you wouldn't have to learn the position, you just know it...

I'm learning scales myself, and i manage to remember the positions, but now i'm really trying to know the names of the notes.

Some other advantage I just thought of: Eventually you will know the names of the notes all over the fretboard, and that makes it easier to form chords you come across for the first time.
#4
Yeah exactly, thats why I started by knowing the notes on the fretboard, etc, and now im going into scales, so probably it'd the best if I take advantage of what i learnt about the notes and apply them to the scales, when playing.

Thanks for that, any other sugestions are welcome though
#5
When I first started out I simply learned the scales and I think thats a great way to go about it. Understanding music and why things are formed are somewhat difficult if you don't even really know what you are playing. However, if you learn the scales you can pretty much hear the differences as you finger each one (thats what she said) and you get a better understanding of how they are formed just from listening. Of course once you have the fingering down and can fly through, its great to learn the origins of what you are playing...but I recommend learning them first and messing around with them by ear. Just stick around the root notes starting and stopping on each one and play with what you think sounds good. Then go back and learn why these are the way they are.
#6
Simplify
Divide and Conquer

Each fret is a half tone.

Starting with C.

There are 12 notes:
C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B

Flats are the same as sharps, just named from the other direction
C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G, Ab, A, Bb, B

The C Major scale is:
C, , D, , E, F, , G, A, , B ,add the next C

8 notes C to C= Octave

Whole tone= 2 Half tones

Major Scale pattern, (for all of 'em)

W, W, H, W, W, W, H (EVERY SCALE HAS A PATTERN-see google)

Pick a note, any note, any where on the guitar
Follow the pattern, the ONE above not the 132+ you'll have to memorize
You have now mastered the Major Scales.
Cheers! It took me much longer.
Last edited by Aquaegrannus at Mar 11, 2008,