#2
with the guitar there mostly used for soloing. it's a way of staying in key with the song. Fairly basic explanation but i got coursework to do...wikipedia it if u wanna know more.
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#3
They're selections of notes that sound good.
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#4
pretty much the building blocks of music as a whole....not like they're important or anything....
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#5
It's a logical way of determining where to go from any given position in terms of note to note. It also helps the brain determine what works over chords, progressions, and other notes. It's really just one of a couple ways to write, communicate, or perform music, that's all. You can accomplish the same thing by ear if you work at it. Just depends on how you want to accomplish a common goal.
#6
it basically tells you what notes will sound good and which ones wont fit with the song
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#7
Not knowing scales would be a little like trying to write a poem without using real words - in some cases it could work and be very cool, but the chances are better if you stick to a commonly understood medium, which is what scales/language are.
#8
they're guidlines, don't think of a scale as a selection of notes that you must use, they just fit well together and chords can easiyl be derived from them. Randy rhoads had some very classical compositions but he had no problem throwing in a bunch of accidentals that still sounded great. if you're trying to write a solo, for example, and you know the key, then you know which notes will sound better than others, whereas if you don't you have to come up with notes by trial and error, which takes longer
#9
Quote by disillusia
Not knowing scales would be a little like trying to write a poem without using real words - in some cases it could work and be very cool, but the chances are better if you stick to a commonly understood medium, which is what scales/language are.


Wow that's a really good Analogy
#11
Quote by Lefty7Stringer
they're guidlines, don't think of a scale as a selection of notes that you must use, they just fit well together and chords can easiyl be derived from them. Randy rhoads had some very classical compositions but he had no problem throwing in a bunch of accidentals that still sounded great. if you're trying to write a solo, for example, and you know the key, then you know which notes will sound better than others, whereas if you don't you have to come up with notes by trial and error, which takes longer


Yeah, Randy's the best
But like L7S said, learn the scales but don't be afraid to sometimes use the odd note which isn't in the scale to spice things up.
#13
Quote by MarcusMorris
what are sad soundin scales


Usually ones with a minor tonality. Start with the natural minor scale. In Am that would be A,B,C,D,E,F,G,A
#14
Minor Scale, Diminished, maybe Blues pentatonic and Phrygian too.
#15
If you are jammin' along with some buddies & playing by ear, if you know what key the song is in, you have a better chance of guessing what chords to play and what notes would sound good with the piece.
#16
Quote by MarcusMorris
what are sad soundin scales


locrian, aeolian, phyrygian and dorian modes will give a sad sound because they are all minor except for the locrian which is diminished

or if you wanna go basic try the blues scale sorta gives it a sad sound

scales are what songs are written from from one scale a composer can work out a chord progression and what notes would sound the best within that chord progression
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...