#1
I've been playing guitar seriously for about 6 months now (Fender Strat through a Tubescreamer and a Fender Princeton Reverb Amp) and I've learned most of the "basics". Like open and bar chords, the major scale positions, the pent. minor positions, basic chord progressions, and a little theory. The problem I run into when trying to improvise is playing the notes within a scale for soloing. I'm having trouble "connecting the dots" to create something that has a discernible flow.

I hope I've explain this coherently.
#2
um, keep trying. Dont make the intervals in between notes too far, and just practice it.
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#3
Its easier if you make up a basic melody, but if you just want a solo its all about just trial and error and eventually moving around soloing gets easier. Just solo all over the place trying to keep in the scale on different strings and youll find how to connect parts.
LIFE IS TOO SHORT NOT TO LET YOUR MIND SPREAD WINGS AND TAKE FLIGHT

Quote by KeepOnRotting
+Infinity. This dude knows good metal.
#4
Depending on how familiar with the scales you are, hit the notes on the scales in no particular order and try to move up the fretboard by combining the minor and major pentatonic scales. Also before going into the solo try and find a note that corresponds to the chord (assuming that's what you're transitioning from) and take it from there. Do the same when going back into the rhythm guitar. My suggestion is to find a rhythm cd and play riffs to the chords to become familiar with what chords go with what scales. I think you'll find trial and error is going to be your new best friend when attempting to create an ear-pleasing song/solo.
#5
Quote by BChill
Depending on how familiar with the scales you are, hit the notes on the scales in no particular order and try to move up the fretboard by combining the minor and major pentatonic scales. Also before going into the solo try and find a note that corresponds to the chord (assuming that's what you're transitioning from) and take it from there. Do the same when going back into the rhythm guitar. My suggestion is to find a rhythm cd and play riffs to the chords to become familiar with what chords go with what scales. I think you'll find trial and error is going to be your new best friend when attempting to create an ear-pleasing song/solo.



Much appreciated sir.