#1
Hi, i heard some guy taslk about adding distortion so that the sound of the electric guitar changes? how do I do that? is it something you do with the amp or the guitar itself? amp is a roland microcube and guitar is dean vendetta1.
#3
I would think any channel besides clean would be distortion, but then again i dont have a cube.
Quote by barden1069
A "tubescreamer" is a person paid by a guitarist to stand behind the amp and scream at the tubes. This terrifies the tubes into overdriving and delivers a thick, harmonic-rich tone.
#4
Some amps have distortion effect in them (sometimes there is a clean channel and a gain channel).

If they don't have either than buy a distortion pedal.
#5
put it on r-fier and turn up the gain knob that my friend is distortion
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#7
I got a microcube for headphone use...either way, every channel is just a bunch of distortion...only way to make the amp even possible to bear is with an EQ pedal (can get some worthwhile tones then). Otherwise, aside from the Jazz Chorus model, it seems they all have distortion with increasing "heaviness" as you go all the way up to the rectifier model... you can increase the distortion and output on each model with the "gain" knob. Not all SS amps are bad as I've had a nice 80s Fender SS in the past, but tubes are the way to go...
#8
Quote by 4regt4
I got a microcube for headphone use...either way, every channel is just a bunch of distortion...only way to make the amp even possible to bear is with an EQ pedal (can get some worthwhile tones then). Otherwise, aside from the Jazz Chorus model, it seems they all have distortion with increasing "heaviness" as you go all the way up to the rectifier model... you can increase the distortion and output on each model with the "gain" knob. Not all SS amps are bad as I've had a nice 80s Fender SS in the past, but tubes are the way to go...


Jazz Chorus and Black Panel won't even get distorted for me.. Maybe it's your headphones?
#9
Quote by pugnapugnapugna
Jazz Chorus and Black Panel won't even get distorted for me.. Maybe it's your headphones?


with or without...it may be the 3 guitars I've used with it thus far having high output bridge pups (Gibson LP Classic 500t, Jackson J80 [KV Pro], Duncan Invader [WR1])...I'll have to try my Fender strat on it and make another judgement with cleaner pups...
#11
Quote by pugnapugnapugna
Jazz Chorus and Black Panel won't even get distorted for me.. Maybe it's your headphones?


You still answered the unbelievable question though... so he should figure it out. Yet my recommendation is definitely an EQ pedal as the next gear choice (will always be useful for something beyond the cube as well).
#12
Quote by TaintedFearSBT
turn up the gain?

Gain = overdrive =/= distortion.

Distortion and overdrive are two different things people, learn it. Distortion is an artificial effect that modifies the base signal, overdrive is a natural effect that comes from driving (e.g. turning up the gain) an amp or pre-amp harder than it is naturally capable of coping with, causing the signal to 'clip' (be aware that a speaker 'clipping is not the same thing - in fact a clipping speaker simply means your gear isn't up to scratch, and you're probably damaging your amp. You want the pre-amp to clip, not the speaker itself).
Overdrive is 'warmer', more natural sounding, will increase/decrease depending on how you play (digging the pick more, for example), and is mostly used in blues and rock. Distortion is colder, more precise and unnatural, doesn't increase or decrease depending on how you play to such an extent as overdrive does, and is mostly used in metal, 80's style rock, or often as a 'boost' to natural overdrive in normal rock, for making a guitar solo stand out more, for example.



Anyway. You can achieve either effect a number of ways. Some amps have separate channels or controls for one or both of these effects, though of course on-amp effects aren't very flexible or practical. Separate effects pedals are usually a better choice. You can get pedals which will increase overdrive (e.g. the BOSS OD series), add distortion (e.g. the BOSS DS series), or sometimes both (e.g. Digitech Screamin' Blues OD/Distortion). Which is better for you depends on the precise tone you're seeking, what guitar you have, what amp you have, what cables you use, your playing style, and what style of music you play.


For the record, overdrive tends to sound awful with cheap gear, especially solid state amps (which is most common practise amps). On the other hand, most professional players prefer overdrive, as with top gear it can be more artistically useful than distortion, even when playing metal (for example, overdrive normally exaggerates harmonics better than distortion does). Distortion however sounds about the same with most gear, so is more popular with beginners and people with poorer equipment, or for those who are specifically after a 'dead' tone (for example, almost all gothic and black metal bands use distortion over overdrive, even if their guitars and amps are more than capable of working with overdrive very well).
#13
my 3 ways to crank distortion, treble pickup on, crunch mode (line 6) turn up the drive, distortion (ds-1) boss foot pedal. together, im heavier than a fat man coming out of a drive thru XD
#14
Quote by telecastrmastr
my 3 ways to crank distortion, treble pickup on, crunch mode (line 6) turn up the drive, distortion (ds-1) boss foot pedal. together, im heavier than a fat man coming out of a drive thru XD


Treble pickup = Bridge pup, and in reference to the threadposter asking specifically about a microcube, this info is misleading--I've found that using a disortion or overdrive pedal on a Microcube will sound really really bad... (to threadposter: the cube does get its own distortion as previsously answered in the thread)