#1
If you had a spell that you could use to become another bassist for just one concert from any moment in time, and have his/her chops (so you don't look like a complete fool), which bassist would you be?

I choose to be John Paul Jones during the early part of Led Zeppelin's "In Concert and Beyond" tour (1973)--the one where "How the West Was Won" was recorded. To be in front of so many people, and interacting with Bonham, Plant and Page--that was real chemistry. They knew the songs inside and out, and they pushed the limits within the framework to improvise new riffs and parts, and take the piece to completely different places. They were masters of action-reaction performance, where one player would do something new and the rest would sense and roll with it, then return to where they were supposed to be. And they made it fun.

My rant: There are too many musicians who just know their parts and know how to improvise within their solo framework. We need more players who play by intuition, who can interact musically with the other band members on the fly, who can sense and give cues to changes and have the balls to roll with them. I have seen and heard this in a lot of Indian classical music--the call and responses, the improvised sections, the intuitive interplay between players. If more modern bands played like that, I would listen to modern music more. I love those fleeting moments when the band spontaneously takes the song to an otherworldly level--that unrehearsed chemistry. There are too many bands that just play what was rehearsed or written. If only they could just tap the muse and ride with the vibes to be able to read each other more--dare to stretch their boundaries during a live performance--their music would be more interesting to me. Each performance of the song would be a little different somehow. I wish more bands did that today, instead of relying on playing the same thing every gig.
Jaco de Lucia.

The Zen of Duh: How low can you go? Zero Hertz. That's the lowest anyone can go. Just turn off your bass amp and not play.

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#4
I think I'd be either Dan Briggs from BTBAM or the bassist from Cannibal Corpse. Those guys are brutal.

To TS: You're absolutely right about that. Too many bands play their set and that's it. If you're willing, however, there is a genre I'm a great fan of that still has chemistry and flows: Christian Worship music. You wouldn't guess it, but a lot of those bands just go and do whatever feels right, rather than sticking to the set songs. Even the smaller worship bands like mine can have songs that last 20 min just because we're flowing and the singers improvise new lines. It is, pun somewhat intended, a religious experience. I've listened to a live CD of one of my favorite worship leaders and half of his songs last about twice as long as they're supposed to.
Millie, my Peavey Grind Fiver
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#5
Quote by StraightxXxEdge
I'd be Pete Wentz. Then I could save the chops part of my spell for another time.

LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL

Good call, and with being him your gunna get all the tail you want

I would probably choose Geddy Lee
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Last edited by gibson_10 at Mar 12, 2008,
#6
I'd like to have taken Dylan Roche's place in Brant Bjork's band when I saw them in 2005 - it was during that week when England has a real summer, underground in the smallest, hottest club ever and they played out of their skins - every song seemed to go into a ten minute jam of improvised solos. The drummer Mike had broken his ankle so was using his heel to press down on the hi-hat pedal and at one point he threw away his sticks and drummed with his hands. Brant Bjork was playing this beaten up old Squier strat with a string missing and had his old Marshall at the front of the stage so you could hear it over the PA which sounded AMAZING. They chatted to us at the front between songs and the drummer kept winking at my missus which was funny. It seemed like they didn't want to stop playing but were just totally exhausted by the end and hit the bar to chat to people. They played like I imagine Jimi to have played at his very best.
#7
This was really hard for me to pin down to one tour or concert, or even one bass player, but I have gotten it down to two:

Duck Dunn as part of Booker T's and the MGs backing Otis Redding at Monterey Pop. Even more so than the Funk Brothers of Motown fame, the MGs remain one of my favourite soul backup groups. And to back Otis, that must have been amazing.

Les Claypool, San Francisco 2000, Fearless Flying Frog Brigade tour in which they played Animals (Pink Floyd) in its entirety. Great concert and really powerful re-interpretation of one of Floyd's darkest albums.
#8
I think it would be awesome to be Chris Wolstenholme and play with Muse at the Albert Hall
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



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#9
Quote by anarkee

Les Claypool, San Francisco 2000, Fearless Flying Frog Brigade tour in which they played Animals (Pink Floyd) in its entirety. Great concert and really powerful re-interpretation of one of Floyd's darkest albums.



Agreed, that is a killer version of Animals. I love the Frog Brigade double disk, were you there?
#11
Quote by Sly Taco
Agreed, that is a killer version of Animals. I love the Frog Brigade double disk, were you there?


No I missed that tour ---that was the year we finally got a house, and so we had a serious hiatus on concert going. I would have loved to have been there--a friend of mine went and said it was incredible, he still goes on about it to this day.
#13
Quote by gibson_10
Good call, and with being him your gunna get all the tail you want

I would probably choose Geddy Lee

Good call. Have you ever seen a recent video of Rush playing? Watch them play YYZ. Geddy's just smiling and looking around. Not even looking at his fretboard for a lot of it. That's simply enviable.

Me PERSONALLY... I'd probably have to go with Flea at Woodstock. I totally wish I could get naked in front of that many people and be idolized for it.

Don't think I'm shallow, he's also the funkrockin' beast that we all know he is. The naked thing is just an awesome bonus.

Am I too focused on being naked?
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#14
Yeah, I'd have to say Geddy Lee too, just for a chance to play alongside the other two guys, especially Neil Peart. It must be awesome to have a drummer like him. I'm thinking I would be him at their Rio concert, the one that was put on DVD. When I saw them in person in Kansas City, I was just awestruck at how well everything seemed to fit together, even though Geddy's just walking around and smiling and Alex is doing the same.
Just remember...

"If we can hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards. Checkmate."


#20
I'd love to have played a show as Cliff Burton in the mid-80s with Metallica. But now, I'd settle for Trujillo.