#1
I've got a gig on friday and I'm thinkng of boiling my strings beforehand, they are not particularly dead but they have lost brightness. I understand that you boil them for 45 mins and then put them in the oven for 15 afterwards?

Is there any risk of me damaging my strings in doing this as I don't want to mess them up before this gig? Also will doing this reduce the lifespan of my strings in any way?

Cheers

PS They are rotosound swing bass strings if it matters.
Last edited by Ripper_66 at Mar 12, 2008,
#2
i would just get new strings.
My name is Charlie.

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#3
buy a new set
then boil your old set.

if it doesn't work, you have new, crisp, delicious strings.
problem solved, and you only spent about $20
#4
Here's the instructions from the FAQ...

Find an old cooking pot that will never be used for cooking again and add your strings and water and boil them for 20 minutes. After taking the strings out of the pan, you can remove as much of the water as possible from the string with a lint free cloth and then set them some place warm to dry; or you can bake them in an oven for 15 minutes at 400 degrees to remove the water and avoid rust.

With that said, boiling is only a quick fix. You will not regain all lost string life and there is some weakening of the strings themselves in the process. When I used to do this to guitar strings, it was a one time deal and then when they went dead again, I'd pitch them out.

If it were me and I had a gig to play, I wouldn't bet the house on boiled strings myself. They do have a tendency to break easier after boiling and don't really have that new strings sound, but the cleaning does bring back some of the tone. For peace of mind and tone considerations, I'd just buy a new set.
#5
I can't really afford a new set, would you say I'd be better off not boiling them then?
#6
DO NOT boil your strings. You'll get like 2 or 3 days of added life to them. And then you will still end up buying new strings.

The best way to clean your strings

I have not done this, as I get new strings regularly, and either way I do prefer that dead sound. The author of the site though is very knowledgabe, and I would take his advice into consideration.
He don't remember, how it got there
It had a number, written on his forearm
It spelled disaster
#7
Thanks for the link I don't think I will be able to get the alcohol in time but I will look into it for the future.
#8
Quote by anarkee

Find an old cooking pot that will never be used for cooking again and add your strings and water and boil them for 20 minutes. After taking the strings out of the pan, you can remove as much of the water as possible from the string with a lint free cloth and then set them some place warm to dry; or you can bake them in an oven for 15 minutes at 400 degrees to remove the water and avoid rust.


i bake them until golden brown, and serve them with a side salad, and a nice white wine.

buy new strings!


Edit: Disclaimer,
i have boiled my share of strings. and it does work, for a little while.
Last edited by 83lespaulstudio at Mar 13, 2008,
#9
Boil them for 15-20 mins, as instructed, but put one tablespoon of vinegar, and a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda in the pot.
Once you've made sure they're dry, and through the oven; turn the freezer to max and chuck them in for 3-4 hours.
Technically speaking, you're resetting the grain structure of the metal of the strings. It isn't the ultimate answer, only buying new ones will really suffice.
I know from experience that Rotos don't respond as well as some other brands. I know how it works, having studied metallurgy. I also know far too many cheapskate tactics, as sadly I earn in a month what I used to earn in a week. Looong story....