#1
If an F major and D minor scale have the same notes, and the only difference is that they start on different notes within the scale, if you're looking at a piece of music with a key signature of a flat on the G string, how can you tell if it's F major or D minor?

Bear with me, I have a very basic knowledge of theory...
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#2
usually u can tell by the "sadness" of the piece and also, theoretically speaking, u could check the last chord that's played (usually, in regular music, the piece will end in its tonic)

also, u can check the chordal progression
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#3
umm as far as i know u really can't. The only difference is there tonic.

If im wrong i hope someone corrects me!

Edit: ^ true the piece will probably end on a perfect cadence in most cases, but there's no deffinate way. Just listen to the piece.
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#4
Quote by GodofCheesecake
if you're looking at a piece of music with a key signature of a flat on the G string, how can you tell if it's F major or D minor?


What do you mean flat on the G string? if your in F major or D minor then you would have a B flat in the key signature. Anyways, the only real way to tell is by listening to or looking over the song to discover its tonality.
#5
Quote by Windwaker
What do you mean flat on the G string? if your in F major or D minor then you would have a B flat in the key signature. Anyways, the only real way to tell is by listening to or looking over the song to discover its tonality.



I don't mean a flat on the actual note on the string, I mean when you're looking at a sheet of music, and over on the far left, on the key signature next to the treble clef, there's a flat. On the G string.

There's probably a better way to say it than that, but once again I know nothing about theory...


EDIT: oh snap, I just realized in my head I combined the music staff with guitar tabs and mistook the "b" line for the G sting on the guitar... Ok, you're right, wow I feel stupid
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My progressive rock project, Mosaic

Quote by Lappo
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BTBAM IS ALWAYS RELEVANT
#6
Major if its sounds major; minor if its sounds minor. If it goes through key changes, then you generally go for the major because you use that as you root position in most keys, even if it doesn't start on the major.

Look at the chords, that's how you know what the composer meant, ie:

Autumn Leaves ( I use ^ for the triangle that means major7)
Am///D9///G^///C^///Fdim//Em7//B7

The key signature would be written with F# only, it means the key is A minor (relative major= G major) because that's where it resolves.

Theory is just a way of communicating, break the rules if it makes it work better; just say how it sounds.
#7
Quote by GodofCheesecake
I don't mean a flat on the actual note on the string, I mean when you're looking at a sheet of music, and over on the far left, on the key signature next to the treble clef, there's a flat. On the G string.

There's probably a better way to say it than that, but once again I know nothing about theory...


EDIT: oh snap, I just realized in my head I combined the music staff with guitar tabs and mistook the "b" line for the G sting on the guitar... Ok, you're right, wow I feel stupid


theres a b flat everywhere, and normally you can tell by listening and looking at the chord progression.
#8
If the chords constantly want to resolve to F major, then it's F major. It they want to resolve to D minor, then it's D minor. Don't think that just because two scales share the same notes that they are the same. "Their" and "There" aren't the same, just as "Blew" and "Blue" aren't the same thing. It just depends on the context in which the chords are being used.
#10
Perhaps he meant A-Dorian?
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#12
i think i remember reading something about you can tell by the leading tone or something?
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#13
In most classical pieces, do a chordal analysis of the first measure, because a lot of pieces will begin on the tonic chord. Then figure out where the chords seem to want to resolve, as someone else suggested. Chordal analysis will help if you can do it, as there are often quite a few I and V chords which should be able to help you.
#14
Quote by C.C. Deville
i think i remember reading something about you can tell by the leading tone or something?



that was probably saying if its in a harmonic minor key. if you have a Bb in the key signature and a # before a C then you could tell it's d harmonic minor.

i don't know, just a guess.


but to the thread starter, usually you just look to the beginning and end. look for the chord tones of a major or minor chord and it'll tell you what key it's in.
#15
Quote by GodofCheesecake
I don't mean a flat on the actual note on the string, I mean when you're looking at a sheet of music, and over on the far left, on the key signature next to the treble clef, there's a flat. On the G string.

There's probably a better way to say it than that, but once again I know nothing about theory...


EDIT: oh snap, I just realized in my head I combined the music staff with guitar tabs and mistook the "b" line for the G sting on the guitar... Ok, you're right, wow I feel stupid
I have totally done that before
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#16
Quote by Paquijón
I believe this is actually in the key of E minor.


No, the Fdim wouldn't fit (I think...).
#18
Am///D9///G^///C^///Fdim//Em7//B7

It's definitely Emin. It has to be iv - V of III - III - VI - (shift to Ebminor)vii of i(shift back) - i - V

That progression makes sense even with the Fdim because of the strong i - V that follows.
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