#1
I've seen this thorwn around a lot in many different places. When people are suggesting amps, someone always says, "You could get a Mesa, but then you'll get that recto sound". Or something like, "if you want generic metal, get a recto"

So I'm wondering, is there something (good/bad) that characterizes the Mesa Rectifier line?
On a further side note, is Carcass's later tone based off of a Recto? Beause from reading things and hearing sound samples, that thick fat death metal distortion makes me think of a Dual/Triple Rectifier
#2
recto sound is idiosyncratic to mesa--its now known as its own type of tone
kinda how brown sound refered to marshal, etc

the line is fantastic tho, they play and sound great
Gear

Gibson Les Paul Standard
Fender American Strat
Taylor 214ce
Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier (about to be Voodoo Modded)
Keeley TS-808
Boss GT-10 Processor
Boss RC-20xl
#4
Quote by Dark Aegis
Its short for rectified, referring to the retification tubes in mesas

I know what a rectifier is...
#5
Quote by nedthehead
I've seen this thorwn around a lot in many different places. When people are suggesting amps, someone always says, "You could get a Mesa, but then you'll get that recto sound". Or something like, "if you want generic metal, get a recto"

There's plenty of Mesas that don't give a "recto sound," anyone who generalizes like that has no idea what they're talking about. And if you want a "generic metal tone" you're looking for a 5150 imo.

Rectos can sound different in the way you have them set but still sound like a recto and its much more versatile in how you can make it sound, it just has that certain recto quality that's added to it. A 5150 sounds pretty much the same no matter what you do to its settings imo.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
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#6
i was under the impression that carcass used marshall jcm900 slxs (then again i've heard it's 5150 so ).
#8
Search bar fails me, so I'll ask the noob question... what exactly does the rectifier in these amps do? How does it sound different and why?
#9
Quote by Nightfyre
Search bar fails me, so I'll ask the noob question... what exactly does the rectifier in these amps do? How does it sound different and why?


Well in short, without all the technical junk, a valve rectifier is sort of like a natural compression in an amp. This only happens when the power valves are running hot though. The rectifier limits the current the power valves conduct. With a valve rectifier, when you play a note at full volume, you're adding stress to the rectifier to add more current to the power valves, which causes, I think, the voltage to drop or something like that, which causes a bit of delay from the picked note and note that's heard. As the guitar signal decays, the stress is lowered, and the voltage picks back up, sort of creating a sustain of sorts due to compression. It also smooths out the peaks of the playing signal a bit more, and gives the amp the 'spongy' sound.
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#11
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Well in short, without all the technical junk, a valve rectifier is sort of like a natural compression in an amp. This only happens when the power valves are running hot though. The rectifier limits the current the power valves conduct. With a valve rectifier, when you play a note at full volume, you're adding stress to the rectifier to add more current to the power valves, which causes, I think, the voltage to drop or something like that, which causes a bit of delay from the picked note and note that's heard. As the guitar signal decays, the stress is lowered, and the voltage picks back up, sort of creating a sustain of sorts due to compression. It also smooths out the peaks of the playing signal a bit more, and gives the amp the 'spongy' sound.


Damn that's a good explanation.
#12
Ok, little off topic, but where do you guys buy dual recs? i cant find on them anywhere online for my life?!
Gibson Les Paul Custom
Fender American Tele

F/S:
Orange Rockerverb 50
Orange PPC412
#13
www.mesaboogie.com

Find the distributer list. No one sells Mesas online...
Quote by thrilla13w
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Quote by Slaytanic1993
cowdude speaks words of infinite wisdomery.
#14
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Well in short, without all the technical junk, a valve rectifier is sort of like a natural compression in an amp. This only happens when the power valves are running hot though. The rectifier limits the current the power valves conduct. With a valve rectifier, when you play a note at full volume, you're adding stress to the rectifier to add more current to the power valves, which causes, I think, the voltage to drop or something like that, which causes a bit of delay from the picked note and note that's heard. As the guitar signal decays, the stress is lowered, and the voltage picks back up, sort of creating a sustain of sorts due to compression. It also smooths out the peaks of the playing signal a bit more, and gives the amp the 'spongy' sound.


I thought every amp has a rectifier, that a rectifier is nothing particularly unique, and Mesa is just using it in their amp names.
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Parker Nitefly Mojo sonnn
Jackson DK2M Dinky
Carvin Legacy
Fender Blues Jr.
Roland Cube 30X
#15
Quote by FLCLcowdude
www.mesaboogie.com

Find the distributer list. No one sells Mesas online...


Ah, I was at the guitar center that has them today but I didnt notice any. How much does a dual rec usually go for in US?
Gibson Les Paul Custom
Fender American Tele

F/S:
Orange Rockerverb 50
Orange PPC412
#17
Quote by dcdossett65
Ah, I was at the guitar center that has them today but I didnt notice any. How much does a dual rec usually go for in US?



To be exact, they list for $1699.99
Quote by thrilla13w
The hotbar should be floating parallel to the principle axis at this point. Next, take a hammer, and beat yourself in the face while crying JIHAD. problem fixed.

Quote by Slaytanic1993
cowdude speaks words of infinite wisdomery.
#18
Quote by FLCLcowdude
To be exact, they list for $1699.99


Ouch. Any good combo versions of the amp or something close to that?
Gibson Les Paul Custom
Fender American Tele

F/S:
Orange Rockerverb 50
Orange PPC412
#19
The Rect-O-Verb and Trem-O-Verbs are the "combo" versions of them I guess you could say. Though I like them a whole lot more than the regular recto heads.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com