#1
Hey everyone, poked around the FAQ's and didn't see anything too specific about this...

In all honesty I don't know a whole ton about soundboards or mixing, and I just need a wee bit of help... The soundboard has Hi, Med, Freq(associated with Med I believe...) and Lo on it and I have an idea how everything else on the 'board works.

This might be an exceedingly basic question, but I've never done this before much less really know anything about it... for Bass, Guitar, Drums and Vocals, what should Hi Med Freq and Lo be set to, ideally?

(btw, might be important to note that for the drums we only have one mic and it's overhead... any other info you guys might need?)
#2
in all seriousness, just turn the knobs until it sounds good.

think about it. say you've mic'd a guitar...the guitar is dark and boomy...you'll probably want to turn down the bass. say the guitar is tinny and cheap...you'll probably want to turn down the highs.

to think there's one eq for every guitar/drum/vocal/etc is a misconception.
#3
Yea, I really just don't really know what I'm talking about here...

I've just heard that you should turn up the mids for guitar, lo for bass and somthing with the mic so it dosn't catch as many bumps or produce as much feedback... Not really sure, I've just caught little tidbits every here and there, just trying to solidify my knowledge I suppose.
#4
I wore a post on this in the "Production Tips" thread a while ago.

Now there are no Ideals, but there are guidelines. Every instrument has its charecterestic sound around certain frequencies. Using what that as guidelines you can have a better idea for what and where you're looking for when EQing.
Taken from my post:

Here's a really rough give bout the charecteristics of instruments over the frequency spectrum.

Vocals: contain frequencies all throught the spectrum but loads of times you see a high pass filter at around 1000Hz being used on them. (high pass filter removes all the frequencies below a certain frequency).

Guitar: "body/weight" at around 100-1000Hz, "bite" at around 1500-7000Hz and then has some more high frequiencies.

Bass: goes from about 50-4000Hz

Snare: Body at around 300-1000Hz, Stick at around 1500-5000Hz and Rattle at around 8000Hz upwards.

Kick: bass at around 50-500Hz and Click (the pedal hitting the drum) at around 1000-6000Hz.

Box frequiencies are around 150Hz. These give the instrument a boxy sound. Reducing these frequencies will bring some tightness to the sound.

Magic Number for Kick Drum "punch" = 63Hz. Boosting frequencies around 63Hz on the Kick will increase its punch.


To read the full post:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=584095&page=6&pp=20
#5
parametric!=graphic

he's going to be limited in shaping his sound with such a wide frequency in each knob.
#6
Quote by OrangeMexi
Yea, I really just don't really know what I'm talking about here...

I've just heard that you should turn up the mids for guitar, lo for bass and somthing with the mic so it dosn't catch as many bumps or produce as much feedback... Not really sure, I've just caught little tidbits every here and there, just trying to solidify my knowledge I suppose.


It makes more sense to have said knowledge if you had a 31 band equalizer...with just three knobs, it'll degenerate into guesswork.