#1
Hey guys, I need some quick help! I need to write a melody while following the natural direction of the degrees of the major scale. What I mean is, my teacher told me that the 7th degree naturally leads to the 8th and that other degrees naturally want to go to another degree of the scale (like 2nd to the 1st, 6th to the 5th) but the thing is, I lost my notes and cannot find this information online (i've been searching for a bit).

Does anyone know what I am talking about and which degrees leads to which other degrees in the major scale? Thanks!!
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#2
If you're in C, playing over the C major chord, then your melody with gravitate to the notes of the chord. For example, you have CEG. If your melody is on A, then you have an interval of a second between the G in the harmony and the A in the melody. So A feels like it should move to G.

A stronger example is if you have CEG in the harmony, and you play F. This is only a minor second away from E, so will feel pulled towards it. Conversely, if you have Csus4 in the harmony (CFG), and play an E in the melody, the chord will feel like it should become C major to resolve the suspension.
#4
Quote by one vision
I was also wondering about this.. What is the name for this "phenomenon", is it just called resolution? Like when you play a D7 it automatically wants to pull to the G. From Dominant to root i guess..


I don't think there's really a name for it, it's just where your ear naturally wants to hear the progression resolve to.
#5
Quote by one vision
I was also wondering about this.. What is the name for this "phenomenon", is it just called resolution? Like when you play a D7 it automatically wants to pull to the G. From Dominant to root i guess..
^^^It's called The Harmonic Phenomena. There are some other names for it and stuff but Pythagoras was the first to figure it out even before he knew that sounds were waves. But he concluded that pleasing sounds resulted from frequencies
with simple ratios. He figured out the ratios not by frequencies but by using different lengths of strings. Now that we have oscillators and such, he's been proven right(even though our tastes in music proved him right in ancient times) but more surprisingly his ratios were spot on.

Octaves, perfect fifths, and major thirds have ratios of 2 to 1, 3 to 2, and 5 to 4. The smallest hence most pleasing.

Tritones, and minor-seconds have the largest ratios. That's the physics behind theory. I had a nice link to a page that explained more about the human relationship to sound wave ratios but I've lost it - sorry.
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#7
Quote by KryptNet
^^^It's called The Harmonic Phenomena. There are some other names for it and stuff but Pythagoras was the first to figure it out even before he knew that sounds were waves. But he concluded that pleasing sounds resulted from frequencies
with simple ratios. He figured out the ratios not by frequencies but by using different lengths of strings. Now that we have oscillators and such, he's been proven right(even though our tastes in music proved him right in ancient times) but more surprisingly his ratios were spot on.

Octaves, perfect fifths, and major thirds have ratios of 2 to 1, 3 to 2, and 5 to 4. The smallest hence most pleasing.

Tritones, and minor-seconds have the largest ratios. That's the physics behind theory. I had a nice link to a page that explained more about the human relationship to sound wave ratios but I've lost it - sorry.


Technically tritones have an irrational ratio, thus they have an infinitely large ratio. Perfectly tuned tritones are in a ratio of root(2) : 1, but of course this is impossible to achieve, thus in reality tritones do not have an infinitely large ratio.