#1
I was just looking at the song constant motion by dream theatre

And it says the songs in E phrygian which is 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 but in the song he plays it like this 1 b2 b3 b4 5 b6 b7

What dos this mean.......
#2
It means nothing. You'd be hard pressed to find a single Dream Theater song that's completely diatonic. Petrucci throws in chromatic notes constantly.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by Ravitt
oh i thought it meant it was tritone?


...what? A tritone is either a #4 or a b5, which still means nothing because Petrucci throws in tritones all the time regardless of whether or not they're naturally found in the scale. This is progressive music, not pop rock.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by Ravitt
woops soory it is b5 i was meaning what does a tritone actually mean


A tritone is an interval that divides an octave evenly in two. It is a distance of three whole tones, hence "tri"-tone. It's mildly dissonant.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
A tritone is an interval that divides an octave evenly in two. It is a distance of three whole tones, hence "tri"-tone. It's mildly dissonant.


Mildly?
Originally Posted by SkyValley
yeah im a virgin but im also pretty good at things like ping-pong and drawing pictures of people playing water polo so it balances out
#9
Quote by Baasoromyuu
Mildly?


It's because Petrucci makes it so nobody notices unless they're paying attention
#11
Quote by Avedas
It's because Petrucci makes it so nobody notices unless they're paying attention


Lets be honest, even if you're paying perfect attention it still seems to make perfect sense. John Petrucci seems to ignore the rules of guitar completely, but he is in fact putting every single note together with such stunning precision that you'd be hard pressed to find a better modern day guitarist.

(Knowing people on here I should likely point out I'm not trying to start a competition here. I don't want a million replies saying 'Malmsteen is better.')
#12
Quote by colohue
Lets be honest, even if you're paying perfect attention it still seems to make perfect sense. John Petrucci seems to ignore the rules of guitar completely, but he is in fact putting every single note together with such stunning precision that you'd be hard pressed to find a better modern day guitarist.

(Knowing people on here I should likely point out I'm not trying to start a competition here. I don't want a million replies saying 'Malmsteen is better.')


To start the millions....

MALMSTEEN IS BETTER


actually no.
#13
Quote by Ravitt
I was just looking at the song constant motion by dream theatre

And it says the songs in E phrygian which is 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 but in the song he plays it like this 1 b2 b3 b4 5 b6 b7

What dos this mean.......


It starts in A Phrygian. My tab says E Phrygian aswell. There are bits of it in E Phrygian though. This could be why you're confused. But like Archeo says, I can't think of a completely diatonic Dream Theater song. This one features some B naturals in the intro but it's definately got an A Phrygian feel to it.
Last edited by Eirien at Mar 14, 2008,
#15
Quote by isaac_bandits
Compare it to a minor second...
yeah technically a minor second is the only thing that sound more dissonant then a tritone. But in Petrucci's case, it's always part of some melodic movement so it would sound interesting and not dissonant.
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My Imagination
#16
Quote by KryptNet
yeah technically a minor second is the only thing that sound more dissonant then a tritone. But in Petrucci's case, it's always part of some melodic movement so it would sound interesting and not dissonant.


Always is a strong word. As soon as the band comes in in Fatal Tragedy there's a big dissonant Eb5. I could think of loads of examples where tritones are used by Beartrucci for dissonance.
#17
Quote by Ravitt
woops soory it is b5 i was meaning what does a tritone actually mean


your correct... a b5 is a tritone ( or a #4 )
shred is gaudy music
#18
Yes, and the name gives it away. It's three whole steps.

EDIT: Oops, just saw Archeo posted the exact same thing above.
Last edited by :-D at Mar 14, 2008,
#19
Quote by Eirien
Always is a strong word. As soon as the band comes in in Fatal Tragedy there's a big dissonant Eb5. I could think of loads of examples where tritones are used by Beartrucci for dissonance.
but but but....his dissonance is so consonant to my heart.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#20
^ i do love dissonance in a state of motion. when you can write a consonant dissonant piece it can sound absolutely beautifully wonderfully horrific.
#21
Quote by Eirien
Always is a strong word. As soon as the band comes in in Fatal Tragedy there's a big dissonant Eb5. I could think of loads of examples where tritones are used by Beartrucci for dissonance.


Or in the Dark Eternal Night, the octatonic diminished scale is used, and thus the tritone is used quite often.

But it is true that he often will use the note a tritone above the tonic, as part of a melody more often than playing two notes a tritone away simultaneously.