#2
hmm i'd like to know this as well.

even though i record with a singstar mic into a crappy sound-card into ableton live.. they still sound alright quality. just want to make my voice better.
#3
same here
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#4
add a combo of reverb, compression, or overdrive. subtlety is your friend, use only a slight amount of each. play around with eq as well.
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#5
i've heard around 3000 hz is a good frequency range to make the vocals cut through without being too loud. bit of ambience like delay reverb makes it fit in or give it a bigger sound. also compression is good so the volume of the words is consistent (good singers need less) noise removal, pitch correction etc. main rule is don't over do any of these things.
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#6
Drop the high freuquencies. Add reverb compression. Very slightly. Dont overdo it. The biggest mistake with mixing is when you do too much.
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#7
If it's a rock/metal recording you can probably cut below 200hz. Leave the midrange at unity and try cutting from the higher frequencies. Also try panning the reverb hard left and right, with the dry vocal track in the center.
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#8
There are not many ways you can make vocals sound better other than getting a better vocal recording.

This is why recording vocals is the most important part of recording a song. And it also takes the most time. Guitars. drums, bass, keys and all can be recorded pretty straight forward and it won't take much time.

To record vocals you'll need to make sure you hit every note right. When i was recording vocals for my old band, i did almost 20 takes. Recording just one verse at a time and even sometimes down to just one line at a time. Getting a good/perfect vocal recording is extremely important and thats where most time in the recording session should be spent.

Once you've managed to put together all the perfect recordings to get the perfect vocals, to make them sound better, you usually (in rock/metal) put a high pass filter on them at around 1000Hz (EQ out everything below 1000Hz), just makes the vocals more crisper. Almost all Metallica songs has the vocals cut out under 1000Hz. Then adding just the right amount of reverb is important to give the vocals a good place in the mix. How much is subjective but don't add too much. Just a little will move the vocals back in the mix so that they're not right at the front.
Then always, ALWAYS compress vocals. And here you'll hafta use a fair bit of compression. Making sure the vocals are nice and leveled out throughout the track and all the details can be herd.

Last you can add little things like de-essers (which remove the "sss" from the vocals) and more little EQ tweaks. But if you get a good vocal recording, you won't really need all of that.

So, the most important thing while recording vocals is to make sure you get perfect recordings. No matter how much times it takes, no matter how many takes you have to take, no matter if you end up recording just a line at a time or just a word at a time or even sometimes just a syllable at a time, you'll hafta make sure the vocals are perfect!

The best/most accurate vocals ever recorded in music history were for Whitney Heuston's "I Will Always Love You". It took days to just record the vocals and the producer made her record just a syllable at a time making sure she hits every syllable perfectly.
So yeah, it took ages to record the vocal and took more time to edit all the vocal takes and put them together. But then all that work pays off at the end!
Last edited by af_the_fragile at Mar 14, 2008,
#9
Learn how to sing. Learn how to use EQ, Compression and Reverb.
Then buy better gear when you can get a great result with what you've got already.

For my voice EQ I pull out some lower mids til it sounds alright and boost a little bit in the 5kHz region. But I'm using different gear and have a different voice.

Try boosting a whole lot and moving the Dial up and down the frequencies till it makes a sound you don't like and then you know to cut that out a little bit.
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#10
Quote by af_the_fragile

The best/most accurate vocals ever recorded in music history were for Whitney Heuston's "I Will Always Love You". It took days to just record the vocals and the producer made her record just a syllable at a time making sure she hits every syllable perfectly.
So yeah, it took ages to record the vocal and took more time to edit all the vocal takes and put them together. But then all that work pays off at the end!


BS.

Doing one syllable would make it a lot harder.
There is no way she did one at a time.
Have you not heard of pitch correcters?
#11
Quote by turbulenced
BS.

Doing one syllable would make it a lot harder.
There is no way she did one at a time.
Have you not heard of pitch correcters?

Ahmm...
It'ld be better if you'ld look up on stuff before you make sweeping statements like that.

Dude, i studies sound engineering for a year and i've got good loads of studio experience too. I know how vocals are recorded. I have recorded vocals myself.
If you ever hear professional vocal takes they're two lines at the max in one take.

Yes doing one syllable at a time makes it a lot harder but you also get more accurate results.
Production is not an easy thing. It takes time and effort and it has to perfect.
Pitch correctors are rarely used cuz they spoil the natural tone of the voice.


And the stuff bout Whitney Houston's I Will Always Love You is true.
Look it up.
#12
Vocal Lessons to start ( Haha ) Try using a Pop Screen, Putting the mic farther away from you will help, Reverb it a bit, Mess with the EQ, the Toneport doesint exacly have the best mic pre, and your speakers could just suck. A Lot.
#13
How many vocal tracks do you guys actually record? Just one for the verses, then double in chorus? Or just one all the way thru? One all the way thru, and then copy that and add effects to just that track?
#14
Usually double for the whole track and then add a few more for chorus.

Actually it really depends on the kind of music you're playing.
Like most dance/electronic songs have 2-3 vocal recording playing during verses and upto 4 or 5 during chorus bits.
Pop can be same as electronic.
Rock/metal, you've got about 1-2 vocal tracks for verses and 1-3 for chorus. Depending on the kind of effect you want from the vocals.

Its really very subjective. There are no set guidelines for recording vocals. Actually there are no set guidelines for anything in recording. Its all just very subjective.
#15
^ If you think pitch correctors are rarely used, then I am sorry to say that you are wrong.

I agree about the piece by piece nature of big budget MOR production though. Apparently Mutt Lange (producer of Shania Twain and Bryan Adams, amongst others) doesn't even record chords. He records them one string at a time, to get absolutely pristine (and soulless) results.
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#16
^pitch correctors might be used for instruments and all but they're not used much in big production on vocals. Cuz the pitch correctors destroy the natural tones of the vocals.
Its better (more practical and less time consuming) to just get a better, more accurate vocal take than trying to use pitch correctors and other processors to "fix" the vocals.

Well, there might be producers there who like to use pitch correctors and stuff.
But i personally wouldn't like using pitch correctors for any vocals. Might be for strings and other instruments, but not for vocals.
The less you process the vocals, the more natural they sound, the better it is.
Unless you're in some electronic/industrial band.
Last edited by af_the_fragile at Mar 25, 2008,
#17
AutoTune is used a TREMENDOUS ammount, mainly in the new wave of "rock" coming out in the past 10 years or so. It doesn't destroy the natural characteristics of a voice, if it is done properly and meticulously hand drawn in, it is 99.9% transparent. Sometimes it is used noticably on purpose as an effect, but thats a whole nother story.

Take a listen to whats high on the charts and whats coming out of your FM set, you WILL hear pitch correction, and probably lots of it.

AutoTune on instruments however, is quite rare, with the exception of fixing bends gone bad on guitars and bass etc. I have never seen it used on strings or other orchestral instruments.
#18
^probably cuz most vocalists now days cant sing!
and neither do they have the money to spend 2 days in the studio recording vocals. So pitch corrector is the best solution.
#19
But the whole point is, they DO have the money to spend large amounts of time in the studio, but still use Autotune to achieve a pristine, perfectly tuned vocal.
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