#1
I have been playing guitar for about 2.5 years now. I am in a post-hardcore band that gigs and tours pretty regularly. We have a lot of compliments on our music but, I really want to take it to the next level. I believe learning theory would help me do this. What should I learn, scale wise, etc, to help our music? Any books that I should look in to buying? I already have the Fretboard Logic series and Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitarists.
#3
You don't really need to buy any books, the internet is full of stuff that will help you.
#4
Read the sticky at the top of the forum. Then ask about anything that confuses you here. That would be a great start.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#5
Learn note names, intervals, chord construction, chord progressions, the circle of fifths, major scale and it's modes, basic modal theory, pentatonic scales and then rhythmic theory and polyrhythms.
#7
Wow, thanks for all the information so far.

What should I start with? I really don't know anything. I just play what sounds good to me.
#8
i agree, start with the minor scales and work your way from there. make sure you learn different forms so you can transpose them all over the fretboard.
#9
youu HAVE to start with the major scale, everything else relates back to it.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
^^listen to Seagull. But there's still different opinions on where to start. Again, check out the Theory FAQ sticky.

But here's something you can do right now. Notes go ABCDEFG(duh).

There are 2 half-steps(one whole-step) between each not EXCEPT between BandC and EandF. <--There's only 1 half-step between these.

1) Now Learn the major scale formula WWHWWWH and the minor scale formula WHWWHWW (You can read up on how the minor scale comes from the major scale a little later, cause it's really important)

2) Start on each string and construct a major scale up to the 12th fret while trying to memorize the location of each note on the fretboard.

3) For instance start like this: E(w)F#(w)G#(h)A(w)B(w)C#(w)D#(h)E
4)The do a minor scale like this: E(w)F#(h)G(w)A(w)B(h)C(w)D(w)E

You might not trust me now...but do this exercise and your taking important steps to understanding your instrument and becoming a better player.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#11
Thanks. I already know the major, the minor, and the pentatonic scale. If that helps any.
#12
Quote by 82Camaro355
Thanks. I already know the major, the minor, and the pentatonic scale. If that helps any.
Do you know the patterns or do you know the scale?
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#14
the bits you don't know are the important ones, the patterns are irrelevant in the greater scheme of theory.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#15
Don't learn theory too much. You'll disappear up your own arse. Just be ballsy and give it all your attitude. Dont use your brain too much. You could end up like some maths geek quoting equations. What drew you to music in the first place? Kenny G? Do you want to be playing coffee table lift muzak jazz? Don't go there! I did! Its a horrible place, being up your own arse! Take it from me! Just be full of attitude and cool and energy and anger and forget the theory!................Be emotional rather than premeditated!

(and do you want to appeal to all the blokes or the chicks? ask yourself that really)
#16
Quote by 82Camaro355
I know the pattern. I do not know what notes the scale is made of and, why.
I hate to sound pompous but you could try out what I said in my post. But I'll just say that I wouldn't have listened to my post when I was in your position. But I really think it'll help you start learning the fretboard.


Quote by lsw444
You could end up like some maths geek quoting equations.
yeah sure...learning scales will do that to you

What drew you to music in the first place? Kenny G? Do you want to be playing coffee table lift muzak jazz? Don't go there! I did! Its a horrible place, being up your own arse!


Be emotional rather than premeditated!
It's a shame you couldn't do both. You might have had a lot of fun.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
Last edited by KryptNet at Mar 14, 2008,
#18
Quote by one vision
What helped me learn the fretboard was to take a simple scale, like A minor (no sharps/flats) and play 3 and 4 note per string patters up and down. Name the notes as you go along.


+ 1 for the say & play approach. definitely helpful
shred is gaudy music
#19
Quote by lsw444
Don't learn theory too much. You'll disappear up your own arse. Just be ballsy and give it all your attitude. Dont use your brain too much. You could end up like some maths geek quoting equations. What drew you to music in the first place? Kenny G? Do you want to be playing coffee table lift muzak jazz? Don't go there! I did! Its a horrible place, being up your own arse! Take it from me! Just be full of attitude and cool and energy and anger and forget the theory!................Be emotional rather than premeditated!

(and do you want to appeal to all the blokes or the chicks? ask yourself that really)


What the hell is with you? Every post you're telling somebody to "just relax, forget the theory" or "don't learn modes" or anything to that effect. Learning theory makes you a more versatile musician, there's no way to argue with that. You'll still be able to sound ballsy, but you'll expand your knowledge so that you can come up with a good progression or melody whenever you want to. Theory will simply open up new musical doors, not limit you. If you "don't use your brain too much", you'll end up playing Blink-182 covers the rest of your life and never actually appreciate what it takes to improvise and make musical progress. Telling somebody "don't go there" in terms of theory is the most limiting thing you can say, and it appears you're the only one who's not willing to see things any other way.

And your "blokes vs. chicks" argument holds no water either. I'm a guy, and I've never been to a jazz concert and thought to myself, "Man, that Locrian mode is making me all tingly inside."

Stop being narrow-minded and realize that theory is important.
#20
Quote by lsw444
Don't learn theory too much. You'll disappear up your own arse. Just be ballsy and give it all your attitude. Dont use your brain too much. You could end up like some maths geek quoting equations. What drew you to music in the first place? Kenny G? Do you want to be playing coffee table lift muzak jazz? Don't go there! I did! Its a horrible place, being up your own arse! Take it from me! Just be full of attitude and cool and energy and anger and forget the theory!................Be emotional rather than premeditated!

(and do you want to appeal to all the blokes or the chicks? ask yourself that really)


aww cmon, Kenny G is freakin awesome!

But seriously, I like the idea of having attitude and energy, but learning music theory doesnt take that away from you. The issues you are talking about have more to do with individuals, and how they approach making music. Chances are they would have the same lack of energy and coolness had they not learned theory.
shred is gaudy music
#21
Quote by lsw444
Don't learn theory too much. You'll disappear up your own arse. Just be ballsy and give it all your attitude. Dont use your brain too much. You could end up like some maths geek quoting equations. What drew you to music in the first place? Kenny G? Do you want to be playing coffee table lift muzak jazz? Don't go there! I did! Its a horrible place, being up your own arse! Take it from me! Just be full of attitude and cool and energy and anger and forget the theory!................Be emotional rather than premeditated!

(and do you want to appeal to all the blokes or the chicks? ask yourself that really)



Ignore this.

Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive. It doesn't tell you what you can and can't play, it merely explains why musical concepts sound the way they do. There is absolutely no reason not to learn as much theory as possible. It will only benefit you.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#22
Thanks so much for all this info.

Does anyone know of a website that had blank fretboard printouts so, I can practice learning the notes and writing them in?
#24
Buy, The idiots guide to Music theory. It'll teach you everything. Learn your Major/minor/melodic Scales, All your modes, Chord progession patterns, Rhythms, and everything else in that book. Trust me. IT'S AMAZING.
#25
Quote by 82Camaro355
Thanks so much for all this info.

Does anyone know of a website that had blank fretboard printouts so, I can practice learning the notes and writing them in?
what i did was make my own on paper and you can photo copy a bunch and use them that way or scan them in.i made them fairly big,four to a page then put circles on the frets to indicate the desired chord shapes.where the shapes overlapped into the next shape i divided the circles and colored half with the first shape and the other half with its own color......it worked really well and i still have them in a binder somewhere if i need to refer back