#1
but I'm not sure how. I know some theory (circle of fifths, chord construction, a few scales, etc.) but I don't really know how to use it. Also, my speed and technique such as hammers, pulloffs, and bends leave something to be desired. After 4 years I really want to up the level of my playing.
Play the music, not the instrument. ~Author Unknown


blackzeppelion
Who's the band that could become the next led zeppelin?
Ovenman
Iron blimp.
J.A.M
Aluminum helicopter.
Ovenman
*Breaks out periodic table* Magnesium bi-plane.
#2
Quote by MarshmallowPies
but I'm not sure how. I know some theory (circle of fifths, chord construction, a few scales, etc.) but I don't really know how to use it. Also, my speed and technique such as hammers, pulloffs, and bends leave something to be desired. After 4 years I really want to up the level of my playing.


if you've been playing for 4 years, you should be pretty good by now. i've only been playing for about a year and a half now, and i never learned a scale or any theory, and i've definitely improved.

all i can say is learn your favorite songs. that will improve specific techniques, and if learning songs doesn't help with those techniques, there's tons of lessons here on UG.

sorry if i'm not being clear, let me know if i can help with anything or if you need me to be a little more specific.
#3
4 years? You should know something good right?(this is all coming from the kid who started in Jan.) Only advice i can can give without feeling stupid is "Practice, Practice, Practice". Its what my guitar buddy tells me...
#4
Quote by Showtime1990
4 years? You should know something good right?(this is all coming from the kid who started in Jan.) Only advice i can can give without feeling stupid is "Practice, Practice, Practice". Its what my guitar buddy tells me...


VERY important. you should basically be playing every single day. but not for too long, because then it won't be fun. a good 10-15 minutes (at least) for basic technique practice is sufficient.
#6
Quote by misfitsweare138
Also try taking private classes, that might help you out with your speed and stuff.


i think private classes and lessons (from an actual teacher, not the ones on UG) are for people who have a bit of a harder time understanding stuff unless it's explained to them. not trying to say that lessons are bad, i'm just self-taught.

if you've gone 4 years without a lesson, and you've seen definite improvement, you shouldn't really need a teacher, unless you're really struggling.
#7
If you've got any friends who are really good with theory and technique, see if you can get them to help you out. Lessons from a professional instructor never hurt, either. Other than that, just keep on playing, because nobody can get good without practice. Don't feel bad about not being amazing. I've been playing for a year and a half and I'm one of the lousiest players out there!
#9
Don't worry about playing 4 years and being not as good as you want, 4 years is like nothing for learning how to play guitar (Paul Gilbert was only using upstrokes for his first two and didnt think of playing fast till way after that). I suggest getting a teacher how could help you get on the right path, and work on songs that you really like to get you motivated.
#10
Well what is your level playing now, what songs can you play, you try doing some chormatic exercises to a metronome. What did thats helped me is started to write my own songs. So try writing songs with the scales and chords you know.
#11
Quote by diminishedtobme
Don't worry about playing 4 years and being not as good as you want, 4 years is like nothing for learning how to play guitar (Paul Gilbert was only using upstrokes for his first two and didnt think of playing fast till way after that). I suggest getting a teacher how could help you get on the right path, and work on songs that you really like to get you motivated.


how long do you think it should take for a person to get as good as they want?

i'm feeling good about my skill level and i've only been playing for about 1 1/2 years, is that just because i have low expectations, or am i just a fast learner?
#12
Quote by Metallica_Man55
how long do you think it should take for a person to get as good as they want?

i'm feeling good about my skill level and i've only been playing for about 1 1/2 years, is that just because i have low expectations, or am i just a fast learner?


It depends on your expectations i always want to be a better player and a better musican so im never going to be totally satified with my level.
#13
Quote by Ravitt
It depends on your expectations i always want to be a better player and a better musican so im never going to be totally satified with my level.


2nd. Also, there isn't really a set time scale for learning how to play, but if you feel that your comfortable with your playing that is the good, but you should always try new things. It also might be that your a fast learner, but its just how much time you put into it.
#14
Quote by Ravitt
It depends on your expectations i always want to be a better player and a better musican so im never going to be totally satified with my level.


i'm always learning new songs and improving too. i always want to get better, but i'm usually okay with where i'm at.
#15
Quote by diminishedtobme
2nd. Also, there isn't really a set time scale for learning how to play, but if you feel that your comfortable with your playing that is the good, but you should always try new things. It also might be that your a fast learner, but its just how much time you put into it.


i put a lot of time into it. i think i learn it quickly because i enjoy playing and want to learn. i'm always looking for new songs to learn, or trying to improve old ones.

i didn't think there was a specific scale, i was just wondering if there was a general period of time. i guess everyone's different, and they all learn at different speeds.
#16
Quote by Ravitt
Well what is your level playing now, what songs can you play, you try doing some chormatic exercises to a metronome. What did thats helped me is started to write my own songs. So try writing songs with the scales and chords you know.


I'm not a bad player or anything, and I pick up songs pretty quickly. I do want to start writing my own songs (and I've recently been practicing with a metronome) and thats part of whats frustrating me. Do I just pick a key, work out the chords and start improvising or something?
Play the music, not the instrument. ~Author Unknown


blackzeppelion
Who's the band that could become the next led zeppelin?
Ovenman
Iron blimp.
J.A.M
Aluminum helicopter.
Ovenman
*Breaks out periodic table* Magnesium bi-plane.
#17
Quote by MarshmallowPies
I'm not a bad player or anything, and I pick up songs pretty quickly. I do want to start writing my own songs (and I've recently been practicing with a metronome) and thats part of whats frustrating me. Do I just pick a key, work out the chords and start improvising or something?


well i got an acoustic guitar and my song writing skillswent way up
umm
pretty much go thro some basic easy chords u like
play them slow and hammer some off skip around
uve made urself some riffage.
#18
Quote by Metallica_Man55
how long do you think it should take for a person to get as good as they want?
A lifetime. If you're any kind of artist, you'll never be as good as you want. Life should be a state of "being" - art should be a state of "becoming"
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#19
Quote by MarshmallowPies
but I'm not sure how. I know some theory (circle of fifths, chord construction, a few scales, etc.) but I don't really know how to use it. Also, my speed and technique such as hammers, pulloffs, and bends leave something to be desired. After 4 years I really want to up the level of my playing.


The secret to getting better is really pretty simple: devote your attention to all
aspects of what you're doing. When you notice a problem deal with it. That's
about all there is to it!

Of course, having full control of your attention is something many people can't do
very well. So it's easier said than done. But, it is something you can learn to do.
That's why playing guitar is as much about mind control as finger control.

If you look at frustration, which most experience, I think you can boil it down to
some combination of 2 things: 1) You're refusing to pay attention to some problem
area, 2) You're not willing to put in the time it takes to fix it. Often, you're only
vaguely aware you're even ignoring something or that this is the case, but the
mind will get lazy on you unless your make it do what you want which is really what
paying attention is about. When you know you're paying attention to the right
things and spend the time to fix problems, frustration evaporates because you
know you're always on track.
#20
The best way to improve I've found after six years of playing is to constantly be challenging yourself with new material. You won't see very much improvement if you just noodle around with the same licks time and time again (although that is essential for building muscle memory).

Continue to push the limit and learn songs that intimidate you, it will pay off big time.
#21
Quote by Sublime Stylee
The best way to improve I've found after six years of playing is to constantly be challenging yourself with new material. You won't see very much improvement if you just noodle around with the same licks time and time again (although that is essential for building muscle memory).

Continue to push the limit and learn songs that intimidate you, it will pay off big time.


thats a really smart idea. thanks
Play the music, not the instrument. ~Author Unknown


blackzeppelion
Who's the band that could become the next led zeppelin?
Ovenman
Iron blimp.
J.A.M
Aluminum helicopter.
Ovenman
*Breaks out periodic table* Magnesium bi-plane.
#22
Quote by KryptNet
A lifetime. If you're any kind of artist, you'll never be as good as you want. Life should be a state of "being" - art should be a state of "becoming"


That's deep. I never thought of it that way, at least not that deeply.
#23
Quote by Sublime Stylee
The best way to improve I've found after six years of playing is to constantly be challenging yourself with new material. You won't see very much improvement if you just noodle around with the same licks time and time again (although that is essential for building muscle memory).

Continue to push the limit and learn songs that intimidate you, it will pay off big time.


i agree 110%. i've noticed in my playing skills that when i don't learn something for a long time that it gets a bit boring.

also, if you can't learn something, try coming back to it later. that usually works for me. and if you keep learning songs that are too easy/don't really challenge you, you might get a little bored.

again, practice is the key.
#24
Quote by Metallica_Man55
i agree 110%


I don't agree very much with that.

People tend to move from one thing to another to another. It's ultimately because
they if they try and examine any one thing too deeply they get bored and hope
that the next thing will help. You'd be surprised how much you can overlook in
what you think you already know and how much challenge can be found even in
the "basics". It's depth more than breadth that really fuels progress. Not the
breadth isn't important, but it just doesn't have the same kind of payback in terms
of moving yourself forward musically.

Keep and open mind and never think there's anything "beneath" your practice. One
thing I've learned over the years is that its often in the gap between what you
actually know and what you think you know, that most of your progress can be
made.
#25
I've been playing for three years (three years and three months, technically), and the first time I learned a scale was about a month ago. It was the pentatonic, and I've never ever used it again. I've been self-taught for about a year or so, and I would recommend to learn songs, do UG lessons, and learn to pick really fast and try to learn solos and fast stuff in songs.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#26
the first time I learned a scale was about a month ago. It was the pentatonic, and I've never ever used it again

The Pentatonic? Which one? Major? Minor? Hirajoshi? Doesn't sound like you've really learned it inside and out, and know how to use it in improvisation and composing.
Call me Batman.
#27
also something really helped me is...

just play a lotta songs but except just learning them also improvise and try to change the song to something you really really like...

It will help creating your own sound and songs