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#2
google?
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#3
misery will sing

EDIT:
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google?



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Last edited by MangeRamone at Mar 15, 2008,
#4
Misery will sing
O O O O O O O O O O
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#5
Quote by MangeRamone
misery will sing


what language is it? but i like it my friend wants to use it as a band name
#6
Spanish
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
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O O O O O O O O O O
#7
Quote by Bubban
Spanish


Yes i was right. i knew cantar is to sind but i did know miseria. Someone in school told me it means Sorrow sings
#8
Quote by Guitarlord44
Yes i was right. i knew cantar is to sind but i did know miseria. Someone in school told me it means Sorrow sings

Sorrow and misery are pretty much the same thing
ohai little sig.
#9
I just used babelfish, I'm quite shocked the translation came out right, to say the least.
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
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#10
I know this doesn't seem to matter to people anymore, but I'm pretty sure there's already a band with that name.
Demolition hands.... Got 'em!
#13
sing the sorrow. Spanish is a latin language so I think it is very similar (if not the same) in both spanish and latin.
#14
Quote by Bubban
Spanish

it means the same in Latin
so it could be both latin AND spanish
#17
its latin and it mean sing the sorrow if he likes AFI he would know that
its just that they didnt want to use the album name as a song name too so they put it in latin
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#18
If it were spanish it'd be, literally, "Misery I will sing".

Cantare is "I will sing."
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#19
Its latin.

cantare means " to sing" and miseria means "wretchedly or miserably"

you get the idea.....
#20
Quote by Guitarlord44
Miseria Cantare. My friend said its Latin. I think its Spanish. If you guys know pleas help me.


that's spanish :P, and it means "Misery will sing". man, believe me, i'm colombian.
Last edited by garage_kid at Mar 15, 2008,
#21
I'm not sure if it could be Spanish, it very well may be. But it definitely could be Latin. These are some possible translations (and I've studied Latin for 8 years, I didn't just plug it into some online translator):

They have sung the miserable (or wretched) things.
The wretched things have sung.

These first two would need to have the -ve- indicator of the perfect tense syncopated then have the alternate -re used as the 3rd pl instead of -unt, which isn't uncommon, especially in poetry.

Oh wretchedness, be sung!
You, wretchedness, are sung.

Those are the ONLY possible Latin translations without any context. Of course the 'cantare' could be a verbal noun, the gerund, but without any context there is no way to know.

But again, it very well may be Spanish, especially since it is more common that 'cano' is used instead of 'canto'.


EDIT: Oh, I just remembered that third declension adj.s can be used adverbally in the neuter accusative pl. So, you can add to the possible translations:

They have sung wretchedly.
Oh you, be sung wretchedly!
You are sung wretchedly.
Last edited by BlackerSabbath at Mar 15, 2008,
#22
It must be Spanish since if it were Latin, it wouldn't make grammatical sense:

miseria = misery (nominative singular feminine noun)

cantare = to sing (from canto, cantare; present active infinitive)

If it were in Latin, miseria would be the object and so the translation could only really be:
Misery to sing

Or if an 'est' were ellided:

Misery is to sing

Neither of these really make much sense, taking that phrase as being Latin, so I'd go with saying it's Spanish since there have been far more coherent translations here from Spanish!
#23
But... Cantaré means "I will sing", and "cantare" isn't a word in Castellano.

If it were "Cantaré miseria" it would mean "I will sing misery", but with the backwards order that it has, it doesn't make too much modern sense and is "Misery I will sing"
My God, it's full of stars!
#24
Quote by Dreadnought
But... Cantaré means "I will sing", and "cantare" isn't a word in Castellano.

If it were "Cantaré miseria" it would mean "I will sing misery", but with the backwards order that it has, it doesn't make too much modern sense and is "Misery I will sing"


you are totally wrong, 'cause there's no "Miseria" in latin, that's in español castellano, in the part "Cantaré means "I will sing"" you're right, but "Cantare" is a español word, derivated from italian and sardo, mostly used in Spain, and it means "sing".
#25
"Cantare"? No, I'm 99% sure that it doesn't exist en espanol... busca un ejemplo.
My God, it's full of stars!
#26
Quote by garage_kid
you are totally wrong, 'cause there's no "Miseria" in latin

That's completely wrong. 'miseria' is a fairly standard first declension feminine noun.
#27
Quote by Dreadnought
"Cantare"? No, I'm 99% sure that it doesn't exist en espanol... busca un ejemplo.


el título de "El Cantare de Mio Cid", no te dice algo??
#29
Quote by Dreadnought
"Cantare"? No, I'm 99% sure that it doesn't exist en espanol... busca un ejemplo.


Yeah, it exists, its the yo form of the future tense. Making the phrase "Misery I will sing".
#30
Quote by gpel
That's completely wrong. 'miseria' is a fairly standard first declension feminine noun.


y mira, "Miseria" pasado al latín se dice "Miseriae", si, es en genero femenino, pero en latíin se escribe "Miseriae".
Last edited by garage_kid at Mar 16, 2008,
#33
Quote by Chobes
Yeah, it exists, its the yo form of the future tense. Making the phrase "Misery I will sing".


Yeah, we already discussed that lol, the 'e' has to have an accent.
My God, it's full of stars!
#34
Quote by garage_kid
y mira, "Miseria" pasado al latín se dice "Miseriae", si, es en genero femenino, pero en latíin se escribe "Miseriae".

I might be misunderstanding since I don't speak Spanish; 'miseria' is, as I said, a perfectly normal feminine nominative singular 1st declension noun. 'miseriae' would be the singular genitive or the plural nominative rather than the nominative.

Actually:
Misery, be sung!

This is a perfectly valid translation (for miseria could be vocative also since the voc is generally the same as the nom with the 1st declension, and then 'cantare' could, instead of being the infinitive, also be the 2nd person passive imperative)
Last edited by gpel at Mar 16, 2008,
#35
In Spanish it would mean "I will sing misery".
No idea what it would be in Latin.
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#36
Quote by gpel
I might be misunderstanding since I don't speak Spanish; 'miseria' is, as I said, a perfectly normal feminine nominative singular 1st declension noun. 'miseriae' would be the singular genitive or the plural nominative rather than the nominative.

Actually:
Misery, be sung!

This is a perfectly valid translation (for miseria could be vocative also since the voc is generally the same as the nom with the 1st declension, and then 'cantare' could, instead of being the infinitive, also be the 2nd person passive imperative)


Miseria is a feminine nominative singular 1st declension noun IN SPANISH, Miseriae is the Miseria equivalent IN LATIN, same definition, and Cantare is another way to say "Cantar" (sing) or "Canto" (singing or song).
Last edited by garage_kid at Mar 16, 2008,
#37
Quote by Dreadnought
Yeah, we already discussed that lol, the 'e' has to have an accent.

I just wanted to sound spanish smart
#38
Ok that is not Spanish. Cantaré means "I will sing" in Spanish. Probably Latin or something.

It isn't hard to figure out though, probably something like "I will sing of misery."
#39
Quote by gpel
That's completely wrong. 'miseria' is a fairly standard first declension feminine noun.


truth. but here it isn't. its a third declension neuter plural adjective (but being used as an abstract noun), because there is no way it could make sense as a feminine singular nominative: it isn't plural and hence 'cantare' could not be a contraction, and it isn't an accusative so it can't be an acc+inf construction. i suppose at a stretch it could have lost something like 'debet' or 'posset', but that is highly unlikely, especially in a sententia-ish thing such as this.

edit: i just read your post regarding it as a possible passive imperative+vocative. good point. i forgot about that!

edit (again): so are you another oxford classicist? exciting stuff.
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Last edited by Gurgle!Argh! at Mar 16, 2008,
#40
Yo soy el muchacho blanco.

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