#1
I've seen John frusciante playing "After Hours" by Velvet Underground but he changed to chords to make it sound the same but with more bluesy,jazzy feel...

How do i change a normal chord into a bluesy,jazzy chord with similar sound?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KL4f4cmhbQ0

The Chords for After Hours normally are just

C, A7, Dm, G, Fm, C7, E7


while frusciante used

A# G7 C7 F7 A#7 D# F#


Thank you very much
#2
at a glance, he played major (or dominant seventh) chords all over the place, forgetting about the minor ones
#3
For one thing, he played it a full step lower than the original. If he played it in the same key, it would be

C A7 D7 G7 C7 F G#

I don't understand all of these substitutions, but I do know that I I7 IV bIV7 progressions are pretty common in jazz.
Last edited by werty22 at Mar 15, 2008,
#4
i think a lot of it is to do with the voicing of the chord. He is playing one note on the B string that decends chromatically. You wouldn't get that same sound using the standard CAGED system. So its mainly to do with the voicing i think, as you can play the same chord in lots of different places on the neck, but get a totally different sound/feel.
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#6
what werty means is a full step lower.

And hes just putting the song into the context of a swing-era style song, and then throwing out the minors, and adding the turnaround.
#7
Quote by PinkFloyd73
what werty means is a full step lower.

And hes just putting the song into the context of a swing-era style song, and then throwing out the minors, and adding the turnaround.


So, i just play a full step lower chords than the original and add 7th into minors? What do you mean by adding the turnaround?

Thanks, and sorry for being not knowledgable
#8
A turnaround is just something at the end of a section of music that leads into the next section. There are some commonly used ones such as:

vi-ii-V
V/ii-ii-V
vi-bVI7#11-V (this is one of my favorites)

And resolving back to the tonic chord (I) from the dominant seventh chord (V7) is a good, simple way (if a little conventional) to throw in a blues element.
#9
Quote by :-D
A turnaround is just something at the end of a section of music that leads into the next section. There are some commonly used ones such as:

vi-ii-V
V/ii-ii-V
vi-bVI7#11-V (this is one of my favorites)

And resolving back to the tonic chord (I) from the dominant seventh chord (V7) is a good, simple way (if a little conventional) to throw in a blues element.



Sorry but i cant understand what it means by
vi-ii-V
V/ii-ii-V
vi-bVI7#11-V (this is one of my favorites)

i know its chord progression but how do i read?

Sorry
#10
Sure, no problem, they're just Roman numerals representing the degrees of the scale. Lowercase represent minor chords, uppercase are major; so for example in C major you'd have:

1. Am-Dm-G
2. G/Dm-Dm-G
3. Am-Ab7#11-G
#11
Ohh, i understand now. It is formed using the circle of fifth right?

Thanks
#12
Quote by oreodunk
Ohh, i understand now. It is formed using the circle of fifth right?

Thanks


In general, the Circle of Fifths is used to determine the relationships between certain diatonic scales, so in a sense you are correct, yes. However, these relationships between chords have more to do with harmonic tendencies within one specific key.
#14
It's basically the idea that the human ear naturally wants to hear certain chords resolve to specific other chords, so that a progression will sound "correct". Different progressions and resolutions will be interpreted differently by the human ear, so that's why you'll associate certain progressions with a blues sound, a jazz sounds, etc.
#15
Alright, thanks
Do you know of any website that shows many different kind of chord progression? Thanks once again ^^
#18
Use the E mixolydian mode while playing that song and I think you got it.

My problem I have is I sound like the blues too much and I want to sound hard rock with a bit of British sound to them.
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