#1
1) I know this may be a basic question, but can someone give me a detailed explanation as to what playing in intervals are in a scale? I understand you can play in thirds or fourths fifths etc. based on the style or sounds you might want to hear. But what does that mean? I understand that this is a really broad question so maybe can someone give me a direction or an idea of what to read? I feel like there is one little thing i dont know which is the reason why it doesn't seem to click.

2) Also, a friend of mine has a feature on his ME-50 processor that he can choose what interval he is playing in. What does that do and how and what is it called? :-)

Maybe an example on a minor penta scale can help if one would like to take the time?

Thanks in advance UG!!!
#2
its like, playing part of a chord if you play an interval together, like in C major:

C D E F G A B C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

if you were to play the first and third note of C major, you would have the interval of a major third, C and Eif you were to play the interval of the 2nd and 4th note, you would have a minor third, based on the distance between D and F, which ties into the whole step halfstep idea

however, intervals don't have to be played at once

for instance, if you were to play a scale, lets say C major again, if you were to play through C major in thirds, you would play:

C E D F E G F A G B A C
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#3
Each note in the scale is referred to as a degree, numbered according to its distance from the root. For example, in C major you have:

C D E F G A B

And these are numbered like so:

C D E F G A B
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

So playing a certain interval is merely the distance away from the first note that you play the note with that specific number. For example, playing a D is a second, and an A would be a sixth. If you're reading music on a staff, count the number of lines and spaces away from the first note (the first note counts as 1) to determine the interval.

Then we get into intervallic qualities, such as major, minor, perfect, augmented and diminished. Certain intervals are limited to certain qualities:

Second - Major, minor (Whole step is major second, half step is minor)
Third - Major, minor (Two whole steps is major, one and a half steps is minor)
Fourth - perfect, augmented, diminished (Two and a half steps perfect, three whole steps augmented, two whole steps is diminished). In my experience, seeing a dim4 is pretty rare.
Fifth - perfect, augmented, diminished (Three and a half steps perfect, four augmented, three diminished)
Sixth - major, minor (Four and a half steps major, four minor)
Seventh - Major, minor (Five and a half steps major, five minor)

Usually you won't hear an octave referred to as anything other than perfect.

I hope this clears something up.