#1
Hi all. I bought my Epiphone Les Paul custom about a month ago and I've started noticing that the neck is kind of awkwardly angled. Not sure if this is normal since I played on a Strat before this and I didnt notice this at Guitar Center when I tried out all the Les Pauls. I have some pics below that I just took of my guitar resting on top of my case, which should be a level surface. If anyone who's more familiar with Les Pauls could let me know if this is normal or not, I'd greatly appreciate it. Thanks.



Gear
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Yamaha FG700S
Boss GT-3 Effects Processor

Squier Stratocaster Deluxe [Retired]
Mitchell MD100CE [Retired]
#2
Yeah, it's deliberately built like that. The Les Paul has a pretty tall bridge, and if the neck was flat, the strings would be really high above the fretboard.

So they compensate by putting it at an angle.

A lot of players enjoy the way it feels. I'm not saying I do, but many people like it.
#5
yeah that's a normal neck pitch for Gibsons. I like it a lot better than super low neck pitch strat set ups.
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#7
Alright thanks for the fast responses. I thought mine was screwed up because it wouldn't fit in any cases. Would I need to readjust the truss rod if I change string gauges or should I be fine? I 'think' this guitar came with .9's and I might want to switch off to .10's.
Gear
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Yamaha FG700S
Boss GT-3 Effects Processor

Squier Stratocaster Deluxe [Retired]
Mitchell MD100CE [Retired]
#8
Quote by inferno7758
Alright thanks for the fast responses. I thought mine was screwed up because it wouldn't fit in any cases. Would I need to readjust the truss rod if I change string gauges or should I be fine? I 'think' this guitar came with .9's and I might want to switch off to .10's.

Les Pauls usually have 10's on them.

They probably felt different to a strat cos it has a shorter scale length, therefore also a lower string tension.

You don't need to adjust the truss rod. If it had 9's before, you might need to adjust the intonation, but I don't think it did. Just put the 10's on and set it up. Nothing bad will happen.
#9
Their neks are the main reason why I dislike Les Pauls, they are good for rhythm and slow solos but they suck for shreding.
Quote by Spellcaster
Yes I have sigged myself.
#10
With the arch top and TOM bridge you have to have the neck angle. Strats have a flat top and the low profile bridges so dont need it. And LPs need the special LP case because of the headstock and neck angle. They dont cost more just different, just cant use the generic cheapo electric guitar case some sell.
#12
Quote by SpellCaster
Their neks are the main reason why I dislike Les Pauls, they are good for rhythm and slow solos but they suck for shreding.


that's a crappy generalization, I can shred better on an LP than I can on an Ibanez or ESP.
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#14
heh, all i can say is buckethead manages to shred well enough on a les paul

yeah, the only other problem it can give is that some hard cases wont fit angled necks
Gibson 58 RI VOS Custombuckers
Mesa Lonestar Special 2x12
#15
I like the angled neck a lot myself. It feels as thought the "guitar hugs" into your body.


Though I don't think laying a Gibby/Gibby style guitar flat on its back like what TS had a photo of is doing the guitar much good. In fact, I wouldn't do it at alll, no matter for how short a period, I'd lay the body on a cushion or something to make sure there's no verging-on-lethal pressure on the neck/headstock
#16
ecwomantoneman wrote: ..."Though I don't think laying a Gibby/Gibby style guitar flat on its back like what TS had a photo of is doing the guitar much good. In fact, I wouldn't do it at alll, no matter for how short a period, I'd lay the body on a cushion or something to make sure there's no verging-on-lethal pressure on the neck/headstock "...

Very good advice. Guitar techs will also support the neck (not headstock) if working on the frets or nut to avoid stressing the neck to body joint too. Never prop up the headstock as this places strain on the neck to headstock area where, due to wood removal for the trussrod, the neck is weakest.

As many have pointed out the neck to body angle is a design feature of the LP. A tune-o-matic bridge could never go low enough for non-angled joint unless the neck was raised off the body considerably. I've seen this on some cheap bolt-on neck LP copies and it's horrible to look at and play! The raised string area also gives some addtional accoustic ring to the strings muck like a violin which uses the same idea for its neck to body joint.
#18
Quote by AngelOfHatred
Aren't SGs like that, too?


Yup, and you have to be even more careful with them than LPs, as they have a more fragile neck joint. It's the rule of thumb with pretty much all Gibsons, make sure the body is supported and that the neck is taking none of the strain and you should be fine