#1
Does a capo make a difference other than making it easier to do notes.
Is there any difference between playing the sixth fret with a capo on 5th than playing a six fret the sixth fret with no capo?
I've tried it without and couldn't hear any real difference, am i doing something wrong?
I thought a capo was pretty much necessary when playing guitar, are they really necessary?
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#2
it's kinda for keys...
well yfor ex if you wont go down from the 5th fret than you can put the capo on the 5th fret...
so every time you'll ned to pick the 5th fret you'll just play the string without putting you finger ther...
it's comfortable to get the chords (some hard ones) to the pitch you liek...
and it wont change the tone of your sound...
it's kinda barre finger for whole fretboard for one whole song
#3
There isn't really a difference, and it's not necessary when playing guitar.

It's used mostly in transposing, and changing the guitar sound higher so to get a different sound. (C major chord with no capo is technically the same as playing an E with a capo 8th fret, but the notes are higher, and the C chord just *sounds* different.)
#4
The only reason is because the frets are smaller, and because maybe you like the song two steps higher, but you could theoretically just tune your guitar up or down.
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#7
A capo is used for various reasons, but a big one is to allow the performer to sing along with the guitar in the proper key. Everyone's vocal range is different, and not everyone can sing to a guitar tuned to standard. So a capo is used to change the key of the guitar. Another reason is to match the guitar to the piece of music as it was written.
I even use mine as a measuring tool to check neck relief. Clamp it on the first fret, then fret strings down near the body, say 14 or 15th fret, and the string makes a perfect straight edge to gauge neck relief with. Pretty versatile tool, and one that should be in every guitarists box of goodies.
The best out there by far is the G7th. It's ultra precise, and ultra simple to use. Sorta spendy tho at $50. Ah well, it's only money right? lol
#8
Is there any difference between playing the sixth fret with a capo on 5th than playing a six fret the sixth fret with no capo?


No.

I thought a capo was pretty much necessary when playing guitar, are they really necessary?


Theyre not necessary to play the guitar. They are a very useful tool though.
#9
$50 for a capo? where're u shopping man, u can get a cheapy one for around $20-$30 that'll work perfectly fine but i suppose those low profile one can cost around 50 if thats what u need...
#10
Quote by -=Led_Hed=-
$50 for a capo? where're u shopping man, u can get a cheapy one for around $20-$30 that'll work perfectly fine but i suppose those low profile one can cost around 50 if thats what u need...



You did read my post right? I said $50 for the G7th capo, not other brands. I know full well how much they cost, and own others as well. None perform like the G7th.
#11
The only thing a capo changes is the open strings. For example. put a capo on the first fret then pluck your D string... it's a D#, E flat at that point, not a D. So, if somebody said to play this song in E flat, you have three options... one is that you can retune all six strings on your guitar a half step down, second is to learn a bunch of funky weird and hard chords just for that one song, third is to put a capo on the first fret and simply play in D, relative to where the capo is, so a D chord is actually fretted one fret down, so instead of the second and third frets, it's the third and fourth, with the capo pressing down the D string on the first fret.

This may not make any sense at all, but consider something like a church environment. Contemporary songs at church are often written with a guitar in mind, so it's often in a simple key, just G, or C, something simple. However, many traditional church songs are something like B flat, which is common for a piano. For those, you'd be playing B flat, C minor, D minor, E flat, F, and G minor. Even if you learned all these chords, it's typically only for one song in the set, on one day, one time, and it's very hard to play by ear and know what chords are being played. So, it's tons easier to just capo the third fret and play in G, relative to the capo, as if the capo is where the nut is at the end of the fretboard.
#12
Oh, and in my opinion, if you're looking for something "better" than a Kyser, you're just trying to be a guitar snob. You can find them anywhere from $15 to $20.
#13
no it doesn't change anything.

A capo is an essential in your box of goodies. no you dont need on to play guitar. But it certainly helps composition and is alot easier than changing the tuning of your guitar. Also if your playing live you dont wanna piss around with tuning. Just whack a capo on and play.
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#14
Quote by Footzyrama
no you dont need on to play guitar.


You don't need it to play guitar, as long as you don't play along with a recording on a CD/MP3 or play with other people. For example, you can't pop in a CD and play along with the song "Landslide" by Fleetwood Mac without either retuning or using a capo. But, you can play that song by yourself just fine with neither.
#15
Quote by corndogggy
Oh, and in my opinion, if you're looking for something "better" than a Kyser, you're just trying to be a guitar snob. You can find them anywhere from $15 to $20.


Ok brainiac, answer me this. What is built into a Kyser to clamp down the strings? It's a spring right? And a pretty stout one at that. How about a G7th? How does it achieve it's clamping pressure on the strings? If you said spring, you're wrong. It's you. As much or as little pressure will be placed on the strings based on how hard or soft you clamp the G7th down. A spring type capo is going to clamp down as hard as the spring is set, period. Ever checked your tuning once the capo is in place? Did you know that spring clamp capo's are capable of driving everything sharp because of that spring, forcing you to have to constantly retune every time you use it? The G7th won't because you are only clamping the strings down until they touch the frets and produce the notes of that fret, not beyond like if you were bending all 6 strings at that fret. I own both brands, and prefer the G7th for this reason. The Kyser works well, don't get me wrong, I just prefer to use the G7th for it's accuracy.
It has absolutely nothing to do with being "snobby" either. But it has everything to do with tone and being able to play in tune.
#16
I'm a shubb man myself. I have a jim dunlop one as well, but it was a bit big and it clamped down a bit too hard imo. Capos are cool.