#1
What's up fellow UGers/ists. I was on guitargeek earlier just randomly browsing setups, and saw that Dan Donegan puts a sonic maximizer in the effect loop section of his amp. Is this because you would want to turn it off/on, or because it sounds better at that point in the signal chain?
Also, is a sonic maximizer a good investment down the line? I'll probably get a tube stack at some point first, so don't go giving me that suggestion again, but after that?
Alvarez dreadnought
Gibson SG
EC-1000
Homemade Strat (seymour duncan classic stack p/ups)
Vox Tonelab (original desktop model) with full board footswitch
Vox AD50
Avatar V30 4x12 cab
#2
There's still a big debate if there good and truly worth it. Some people love um some hate um. The key is dont crank up the process knob and they can be pretty good. Going to get some real world tests in a week or so. One of my buddys is gonna bring one up to rehersal and give it a whirl...
#3
you should try it for yourself, i personally don't like them for guitars.
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#4
what do you mean "because he would want to turn it on/off"? i love my sonic maximizer ive had it for about 4 years now and it really is the key to adding so much liveleness to your sound. it adds just the right amount of brightness and low end in the right frequencies
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#5
I was wondering this too.
I'd probably throw it in my loop.
Call me Wes.
Gear:
Fender American Deluxe HSS Strat
Chicago Blues Box Roadhouse
Bad Cat Cougar 5
1957 Gibson GA-5
Ceriatone 18w TMB Combo
Hughes & Kettner Tube Factor
Various Ibanez TS9s
Weber MASS Attenuator
#6
sonic maximizers are a funny things.. I can't explain how they work.. it has to do with your sound waves leaving at the same time or something.. (low freqs travel off the cone slower than high freqs) so a SM is supposedly making it so that the all freqs the cone at once..

i suppose this would allow for a more efficient use of the speakers.. but it confuses the hell out of me on how it would manage to do that, and if its even correct :S

either way, when i tested one out. i didn't like it much. it created a lot of hiss/noise and top end fizziness that i just really didn't like.
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#7
It's meant to enhance your sound, so it works best after the preamp stage (in the loop). It corrects the phase of your amps frequencies. Instead of hearing them out of phase (normal), it balances everything out. They work well with stereo systems to improve clarity.
#8
Basically all it does is takes your signal and process's it to be more uniformed...

Example

Guitar ->acdbcababdcabdab---> Maximizer ---> aaaabbbbccccdddd --- >

So instead of a jumbled mess of frequencies you get a nice uniformed sound. Now if you over process it then you get a digitial sound and hiss.... Trick is dont go over 12 oclock ever....

Hope that helps...
#9
It does, thanks.
Alvarez dreadnought
Gibson SG
EC-1000
Homemade Strat (seymour duncan classic stack p/ups)
Vox Tonelab (original desktop model) with full board footswitch
Vox AD50
Avatar V30 4x12 cab