#2
The same way you'd fit them in anywhere else.

Step 1: Look at the notes in the chord
Step 2: Look at the notes in the mode
Step 3: ?????
Step 4: Profit
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by Galvanise69
Your guess is as good as mine, im pretty terible with theory.

What exactally did you mean by diatonic modes?

As in modes from a parent scale?

C ionian: C D E F G A B C
D Dorian: D E F G A B C D
E Phrygian: E F G A B C D E
F: Lydian: F G A B C D E F

Do you mean like that?


Modes of the major scale. "Diatonic" generally refers to a scale composed only of whole steps and (two) half steps in which the half steps are maximally separated, though the definition is expanded by some people to include the melodic and harmonic minor scales.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Well how about an example:

If I was writing in D Dorian, where could I fit in a say, sus4 chord?
#6
Quote by Avedas
Well how about an example:

If I was writing in D Dorian, where could I fit in a say, sus4 chord?


Csus4
Dsus4
Esus4
Gsus4
Asus4

...would work, though you'd rarely want to. Modes are harmonically unstable, and are best played over one or two chord vamps. Complex progressions will naturally resolve to the relative major or minor. Modes are ridiculously over-hyped and limiting.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
Csus4
Dsus4
Esus4
Gsus4
Asus4

...would work, though you'd rarely want to. Modes are harmonically unstable, and are best played over one or two chord vamps. Complex progressions will naturally resolve to the relative major or minor. Modes are ridiculously over-hyped and limiting.


Thanks, but could you elaborate? I'm not really sure what you mean
#8
Quote by Avedas
Thanks, but could you elaborate? I'm not really sure what you mean


The major and minor scales have much stronger resolutions than any of their relative modes. Any time you create a complex diatonic progression, the tendency is going to be for it to resolve to the relative major or minor (C major or A minor in this case). Modal progressions are generally very simple for this reason, usually consisting of only one or two chords. Locrian is obviously the best example, having a dissonant tonic chord. A Bdim chord on its own will have trouble establishing any sort of tonal center, and the second you throw another chord in there (the II chord especially), it will resolve to its relative major.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by Galvanise69
Thats interesting, So if you write a piece revolving around F lydian, and you put a tonic chord in there Would it want to resolve to your minor? Or your major?

Minors closer so it would want to resolve to there, right?


It would depend on the chord. "Closeness" has nothing to do with it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.