#1
I was looking at the "Name the Chord" thread and noticed something. I had no idea where to start when looking at them.

For example:


E6

---------
---5------
---6------
---6------
---x------
---7------


I used a site to find the name.

For that chord, how would I know where to start? Normally I just look at the lowest note, but in many chord voicings that doesn't work.

The notes in that chord are: B, G#, C#, E

Now that I know the name of the chord, it's easy enough to figure out. But when the name isn't given, where would I start? Is the most efficient way just to take the notes of the chord and find what scale it fits in? That sounds pretty tedious, but it could work.
#3
I look for intervals that are definitive of chord names, mainly thirds.

The G and B strings in this case are a minor third, which is the most obvious third (to me). Thus I build the chord off of that interval.

You can also notice that the sequence C E G B is stacked thirds, thus it is likely rooted at the C note, and name the chord (adjusting for # and b's).

-SD
#4
Quote by SilentDeftone
I look for intervals that are definitive of chord names, mainly thirds.

The G and B strings in this case are a minor third, which is the most obvious third (to me). Thus I build the chord off of that interval.

You can also notice that the sequence C E G B is stacked thirds, thus it is likely rooted at the C note, and name the chord (adjusting for # and b's).

-SD


How do you work from that interval? I'm not really sure how I could get the whole chord from a single interval.

Also, how do you "adjust" for sharps and flats? C# E G# B doesn't fit in any scale I know of.
#6
Quote by Avedas
How do you work from that interval? I'm not really sure how I could get the whole chord from a single interval.


He's saying that between a C and an E is a diatonic third (not necessarily major or minor). A third above that E is a G, and then a third above that is a B. Stacking thirds, as it is called, is the main way to build chords with a diatonic scale.

Also, how do you "adjust" for sharps and flats? C# E G# B doesn't fit in any scale I know of.


Adjusting for sharps or flats is when you fill in the letter names with the sharp or flat signs necessary for whatever key you are in. C# E G# and B are all in the key of A major, by the way.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#7
Quote by seedmole
He's saying that between a C and an E is a diatonic third (not necessarily major or minor). A third above that E is a G, and then a third above that is a B. Stacking thirds, as it is called, is the main way to build chords with a diatonic scale.


Adjusting for sharps or flats is when you fill in the letter names with the sharp or flat signs necessary for whatever key you are in. C# E G# and B are all in the key of A major, by the way.


Ok, that makes more sense. Thanks. And I have no idea how I missed A major...