#1
Ok so I'm a beginner bass player. I have searched all over the net and read through my books and I'm just not sure if I'm reading the vertical scale charts right. From my understanding you start out on the root note and work your way from lowest note to the highest note and back again right? So how do you know where to start the scale from? I'm thinking you would start at the lowest string (E) then go to the root note then go from low notes to high notes on that string then go to the next lowest string (A). Is that how you read the vertical scale chart? If so here is my problem.
Well I'm trying to learn the "C harmonic minor scale" and I'm looking in my bass grimoire book at the "C harmonic minor scale" and it doesn't seem to start on the note C.....???
#3
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
The problem is the Grimoire is probably showing you all the notes in that scale ont he fretboard. For practising basic scales just find a root and then look for notes you can play in one position.


Isn't that how all scale charts work? by showing you all the notes in the scale? I'm just trying to understand how to read the vertical scale chart...
#5
be able to read and play the scale correctly. My friend has wrote a midi track using this scale and I'm just trying to write some bass to add to it
#6
Well, there is no proper way to play a scale. A scale is just a bunch of notes, and in the end it's not like your bassline is going to be going up and down from the tonic to the uppertonic and then back down (unless that's what fits; I've done it). I would say do exactly what you thought to do in the beginning. Play from the lowest to the highest note in the scale that you have on your fretboard, in first position. In this case that would be an F all the way to a Bb, and may as well go up to second position for the C at the fifth fret. Then you'll know what the notes are instead of just mindlessly playing a shape. However, know that your tonic (first note) is C and for the scale the highest note will be the octave above that. So, you'd play it C-D-Eb-F-G-Ab-Bb-C. However you can fit that into a comfortable position is up to you, there are lots of choices, especially in first position (well, a couple at any rate).
#7
wow thank you very much that explains alot. Another dumb question what does it mean when you show the note as a lower or upper case?
#9
There should be a huge caveat in the front of the Bass Grimoire which says that "If you don't know your scale / music theory put this nice red book back on the shelf". Its a dictionary of scales and is about as useful as a dictionary if you don't know your grammatical rules. I own this book and now that I am working 2 octave scales for jazz improv, its a useful tool to figure out efficient fingerings.

The purpose of the Grimoire is to show you scales in different positions on the fret board. So for a C maj scale its going to show you all the notes in that fall within that scale on that position starting from the lowest note available, as Jazzy has said. Learning the shapes without the theory is going to be incredibly limiting at some point.

Don't take this wrong, because this is a really good book, but if you are serious about learning all of this get "Complete Idiots Guide to Music Theory". It explains all of this and more and will make the Grimoire a much more useful tool for you.
#10
yeah I figured that's what it was.

I understand that completely thats why I was asking the question on here. I actually have that book also. I have four books that I'm reading and I'm also trying to figure out the tone port I just bought. I guess I find myself learning things out of order some times. I'm completely self taught mostly because of time but my passion is to learn music.
#11
My advice, for what its worth, is to start with a good theory book and go from there. Work that with a good bass technique book as well. A good bass book will compliment the theory you are learning on the one side and allow you to apply it to bass guitar. And if a getting a teacher is possible, then that route can short the process considerably.

Good luck and if you have any questions come back and post in here or the Musicians talk forum!
#12
Quote by Mogomoss
yeah I figured that's what it was.

I understand that completely thats why I was asking the question on here. I actually have that book also. I have four books that I'm reading and I'm also trying to figure out the tone port I just bought. I guess I find myself learning things out of order some times. I'm completely self taught mostly because of time but my passion is to learn music.
i have some interesting stuff for beginners to learn scales and chord shapes pm if interested.......
#13
thanks for the advice. I have a how to play bass book by Laurence canty, bass handbook by adrian ashton, the bass grimoire and music theory for dummies. I'm hoping this will give me a good understanding of everything but i think i need to start spending more time reading my theory book and looking into getting a good teacher.