#1
Hi All... the first guitar i bought - been playing for two months - happened to have 24 frets. I've since also tried 22 fret Strats.

Is there any particular reason for having one over the other? Or is it just a simple case that the 24 frets give you the option of a few extra high notes?
#2
It's just higher notes. Also, you can find guitars with a bazillion frets sometimes, which is just fun to play for guys like me, who have ridiculously long arms.
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#3
just 24 frets gives you extra notes, but it also pushes the neck pickup closer the the bridge. which makes it less bassy.
#6
Quote by 742627000017
24 frets gives you 2 octaves on your fretboard....thats a great thing



yeah but really you barely use two. if you want to shift octaves you should take up piano. it has like what? 5?
#7
Erm...wouldn't a 24 fret guitar have 5 octaves?
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#9
i hate to disagree with you, but Nasa Ninja is right -
1st Octave Low E open to Low E 12th Fret
2nd Octave Low E 12th Fret to D 2nd Fret
3rd Octave D 2nd Fret to D14th Fret
4th Octave High E open to High E 12th Fret
then theres the 5th, which would be High E 12th up to High E 24th
sorry if im wrong, but was just something i noticed...
#10
Quote by Grimpenguin
just 24 frets gives you extra notes, but it also pushes the neck pickup closer the the bridge. which makes it less bassy.

this makes most sense
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#12
Quote by Zenmaestro
i hate to disagree with you, but Nasa Ninja is right -
1st Octave Low E open to Low E 12th Fret
2nd Octave Low E 12th Fret to D 2nd Fret
3rd Octave D 2nd Fret to D14th Fret
4th Octave High E open to High E 12th Fret
then theres the 5th, which would be High E 12th up to High E 24th
sorry if im wrong, but was just something i noticed...


Dude, Low E 12th fret and D 2nd fret is the same note ;]
#14
You can always do a harmonic where the 24th fret should be, or on the 5th fret to get that other octave.
#15
damn I'm so confused about this octave stuff.... shouldnt there be like... 12 1/3 octaves on a 22 fret guitar?

open Low E to 12th fret.
2nd fret A
14th fret A
4th fret D
16th fret D
6th fret G
18th fret G
3rd fret B
15th fret B
6th fret High E
18th fret high E
and then thers 4 frets left

???
#16
having a 24 fret guitar adds a whopping two notes total, and makes the neck pickup sound weird, not worth it IMO.
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#17
I prefer 24 frets b/c it's easier for me to play stuff after the 15th fret than on my 22 fret guitar.

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#18
24 frets also mean the neck pickup will be closer to the bridge and not at the emplacement players may be used to. It'll sound different as it's not under the harmonic node normally found at the 24th fret.
#19
Quote by JeffWiredBeck24
Same note, different pitch.


are you kidding? 12th fret low e is one octave above open low e. 2nd fret d string is... one octave above open low e. same note, same pitch. different timbre.

edit: grimpenguin, there are only 4 full octaves of e. the ones that you named have a lot of overlapping pitches.
Last edited by rky at Mar 16, 2008,
#20
I have a guitar up to 22 frets, but when I tried guitars that have 24 frets, it made soloing through 12-22 frets way easier...you don't have the body fccking your hand up.
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#21
oh ok, can somebody name the octaves for me? I'm trying to learn the fretboard so I can transcribe music from other instruments.
#22
having 24 frets doesn't necessarily move the neck pickup closer to the bridge, I'm pretty sure on most guitars they end the 24th fret same place on the body as with a 22 fret. Just the 1st fret is further away from the bridge than a 22 fret neck.
#23
Quote by lctdmf
having 24 frets doesn't necessarily move the neck pickup closer to the bridge, I'm pretty sure on most guitars they end the 24th fret same place on the body as with a 22 fret. Just the 1st fret is further away from the bridge than a 22 fret neck.

on 2 guitars with the same scale length (one with 22 frets one with 24), the 22nd fret will be in exactly the same place on each guitar (if you line up the bridge and nuts) which would mean that the 24th fret is closer to the bridge.

to have the 24th fret in the same place as a 22fret on a 25.5 inch scale guitar you'd have to add an maybe 2 inches to the scale length.

Quote by Grimpenguin
oh ok, can somebody name the octaves for me? I'm trying to learn the fretboard so I can transcribe music from other instruments.

lowest octave= E3 (open low e string) to E4
next lowest=E4 to E5
next=E5 to E6
highest= E6 to E7(the 24th fret on the high E)
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#24
Quote by mp3stalin
yeah but really you barely use two. if you want to shift octaves you should take up piano. it has like what? 5?


That's the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard. What? You can't play E2 on your guitar? Maybe you should play bass....

Anyway, I owned both a 24 fret and 22 fret guitar and I prefer the 24 fret one, because I can tap the extra note when playing an Em arpeggio and the design of the guitar is different; i.e. you can play higher frets much easily then on a 22 fret one.
#25
Quote by Zenmaestro
i hate to disagree with you, but Nasa Ninja is right -
1st Octave Low E open to Low E 12th Fret
2nd Octave Low E 12th Fret to D 2nd Fret
3rd Octave D 2nd Fret to D14th Fret
4th Octave High E open to High E 12th Fret
then theres the 5th, which would be High E 12th up to High E 24th
sorry if im wrong, but was just something i noticed...


That is not correct... Just ascend an E scale, (major or minor is the easiest)
1st. Start from Low open E - end it on 7th fret 5th string.
2nd. Start on 7th fret 5th string - end on 9th fret 3rd string.
3rd. Start on 9th fret 3rd string - end on 12th fret 1st string.
4th. start on 12th fret 1st string - end on 24th fret 1st string.

That is only 4 octaves, no overlapping tones. Each E note has a different hertz number.
If you had a 7string guitar with a B string, you would have 5 octaves.
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#26
Quote by Lemoninfluence
on 2 guitars with the same scale length (one with 22 frets one with 24), the 22nd fret will be in exactly the same place on each guitar (if you line up the bridge and nuts) which would mean that the 24th fret is closer to the bridge.

to have the 24th fret in the same place as a 22fret on a 25.5 inch scale guitar you'd have to add an maybe 2 inches to the scale length.


lowest octave= E3 (open low e string) to E4
next lowest=E4 to E5
next=E5 to E6
highest= E6 to E7(the 24th fret on the high E)



Open Low E = E2
7th fret on A string = E3
9th fret G string = E4
12fret high E = E5

24th fret high E = E6
But its not a scale, just 1 lonely note.

However, you can pull off an E6 scale with harmonics. Precision is hard to achieve with hertz that high.
12th - 24th fret high E using harmonics, but its difficult to achieve perfect pitch.

Just ascend an E scale, (major or minor is the easiest)
1st. Start from Low open E - end it on 7th fret 5th string. E2
2nd. Start on 7th fret 5th string - end on 9th fret 3rd string. E3
3rd. Start on 9th fret 3rd string - end on 12th fret 1st string. E4
4th. start on 12th fret 1st string - end on 24th fret 1st string. E5

That is only 4 octaves, no overlapping tones. Each E note has a different hertz number.
If you had a 7string guitar with a B string, you would have 5 natural octaves, 6 with harmonics.
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#27
^That may be, but you just bumped a 3 year old thread to say that.

Seeing as some people who posted in this thread are banned, and the thread starter was last online in 2009, I'd say your post wasn't really necessary.
Check the date of the last post before posting next time
#28
Quote by littlephil
^That may be, but you just bumped a 3 year old thread to say that.

Seeing as some people who posted in this thread are banned, and the thread starter was last online in 2009, I'd say your post wasn't really necessary.
Check the date of the last post before posting next time

Still doesn't change the fact that I corrected the thread with merit. Also, this thread link is the top search for google and 24 fret related things. This thread still is casually viewed at a steady rate and the thread ticker proves it.

And for "some" people banned? No... theres only 1 person thats banned and he was incorrect. That is why I didn't post to correct him.

My post is relevant because when people search the octaves and different pitch hertz this comes up in the top 3. Yahoo answers also has posts by me. Go to sleep troll, I'm only helping by giving information that is correct. Old or not this has had more views 4 years after posting than it had while it was active.

Your comment was the unnecessary one. How about ending the thread with the correct post instead of chin wagging about date relevance?

The last reply to "correct everything" was wrong with overlapping and incorrect pitch octaves that a standard guitar cant do.

Good job you proved nothing with your reply
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#29
I'd take the 24 fret. Less bass is a small price to pay for 2 extra frets for soloing. Also I've heard it affects the pinch harmonics, I don't think so.
#30
Quote by justinhoman
Still doesn't change the fact that I corrected the thread with merit. Also, this thread link is the top search for google and 24 fret related things. This thread still is casually viewed at a steady rate and the thread ticker proves it.

And for "some" people banned? No... theres only 1 person thats banned and he was incorrect. That is why I didn't post to correct him.

My post is relevant because when people search the octaves and different pitch hertz this comes up in the top 3. Yahoo answers also has posts by me. Go to sleep troll, I'm only helping by giving information that is correct. Old or not this has had more views 4 years after posting than it had while it was active.

Your comment was the unnecessary one. How about ending the thread with the correct post instead of chin wagging about date relevance?

The last reply to "correct everything" was wrong with overlapping and incorrect pitch octaves that a standard guitar cant do.

Good job you proved nothing with your reply



Your post was not relevant because you were correcting users who no longer use the forum, posting information not particularly relevant to the original post in a thread made by a person who hasn't used the forums in over 3 years.

There is absolutely no reason to bump a thread as old as this one, regardless of whether you are posting correct information and the thread is still viewed or not.

Show me where this thread comes in the top 3 results for a search, because I searched multiple times for information regarding octaves on a guitar just now and this thread was nowhere to be seen.

The fact is you aren't helping anyone. This thread hadn't been posted in for 4 years. Its poor forum etiquette to post in old threads, it doesn't matter whether you're trying to help anyone or not. If anyone else was looking for the information you posted, it could easily be found with a simple Google search, or they could start a thread of their own.

But if you want to go and find every old thread with a question that has gone unanswered and bump them all, go right ahead. See how many you can bump before you get warned or banned for it.