#1
What is RPS 11? Is that .11?
Gear:
Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster
Epiphone G-400
Line 6 Spider
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
BOSS DD-3

"Wish I Had This" Gear:
Guitars- G&L, Gibson, PRS
Amps- Egnater, Bogner
Effects- Fulltone, JHS, Eventide
#2
If you mean 0.011, I think so. 0.11 gauge strings would not fit on a guitar, that's way too thick.
#3
Are they pretty thick?
Gear:
Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster
Epiphone G-400
Line 6 Spider
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
BOSS DD-3

"Wish I Had This" Gear:
Guitars- G&L, Gibson, PRS
Amps- Egnater, Bogner
Effects- Fulltone, JHS, Eventide
#4
0.11 is 11% of an inch, which is much thicker than 0.011. My high E string is a 0.011 gauge string, which is 1.1% of an inch. You just forgot a 0 behind the decimal, which is a mistake that a lot of people make.
#5
So does that make it easier to bend?
Gear:
Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster
Epiphone G-400
Line 6 Spider
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
BOSS DD-3

"Wish I Had This" Gear:
Guitars- G&L, Gibson, PRS
Amps- Egnater, Bogner
Effects- Fulltone, JHS, Eventide
#7
RPS? Are you talking about the new Ernie Ball strings? all the RPS means is Reinforced Plain Steel. Here's the explanation on EB's website....

A patented winding of bronze wire is tightly wrapped around the lock twist of the ball end. String slippage and breakage are minimized at the ball end where these most often occur. RPS strings last longer and stay in tune better than conventional plain strings.

Its their newer line of strings the only difference is how the string is attached to the ball at the end, thats it but if you're using a Floyd Rose type trem its pretty much useless cause you either cut the balls ends off or have them at your tuning pegs right.

Edit:
...and the gauges are the same just like for any of their other strings.
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst