#2
Preamp: Amplifies a microphone's signal so it can be usable for tracking and mixing. It often gives more character to the mike's sound than the mike itself. You'll need one for that microphone, at least to supply phantom power for the condenser...that would be pretty good for vocals. If you want a versatile mike that can do most of what you want (except drums...you'll need a few) look into either the Shure SM57 or the Rode NT2000/NT2-A.
#3
ok what is a preamp to look at that is pretty cheap and could i use the condensor over head the drums and then amp up the bass drum and maye the snare with the sm57 for recording drums
#4
Don't get a condensor. Cheap condensors are not worth it. Good ones are pretty expensive and you'll hafta be really careful with expensive ones cuz they're quite fragile (can spoil easily by dropping it, hitting it etc.) and really sensitive and will pick up loads of background noises. Condensers shouldn't generally be used outside acoustically treated recording studios. And not to mention you'ld need an audio interface with +48V/phantom power to make it work.

Get a Shure SM57. You can't go wrong with that and its a good mic for beginners. Its very rugged and durable. It can take loads of hits and falls. It will last you for a long time. Then its got a really good frequency response. You can use it to record anything, guitars, bass, drums, vocals, it'll do a great job. And its not very expensive.


And preamp is basically an amp for microphones (mic signal). It amplifies the mic signal to be loud enough for the PA. You don't really need it for recording though. Your audio interface will take care of that.
Last edited by af_the_fragile at Mar 17, 2008,
#5
Quote by af_the_fragile
Don't get a condensor. Cheap condensors are not worth it. Good ones are pretty expensive and you'll hafta be really careful with expensive ones cuz they're quite fragile (can spoil easily by dropping it, hitting it etc.) and really sensitive and will pick up loads of background noises. Condensers shouldn't generally be used outside acoustically treated recording studios. And not to mention you'ld need an audio interface with +48V/phantom power to make it work.

Get a Shure SM57. You can't go wrong with that and its a good mic for beginners. Its very rugged and durable. It can take loads of hits and falls. It will last you for a long time. Then its got a really good frequency response. You can use it to record anything, guitars, bass, drums, vocals, it'll do a great job. And its not very expensive.


And preamp is basically an amp for microphones (mic signal). It amplifies the mic signal to be loud enough for the PA. You don't really need it for recording though. Your audio interface will take care of that.



I disagree quite strongly with that. Nowadays, there are many lower level condensers with very usable results. My Studio Projects B1 was only £65 and sounds great for vocals and acoustic. The SM57 is great, but it's not the best for those uses.

And that preamp talk is rubbish as well. You certainly do need preamps for recording, they are pretty much essential. Even if he uses the ones on an interface, they are still preamps.
There is poetry in despair.
Last edited by fridge_raider at Mar 17, 2008,
#6
Yeah, but you don't need to buy an external preamp.
There is one in the audio interface anyway. And you don't need a huge signal for the computer to record.
You'ld only need the big external preamps when performing live cuz you'ld need the big amplified signal for the PA. Even that if its got passive speakers. Active speakers have a built in preamp in them too.

So you don't need a separate preamp for recording. The gain knob on the interface/recorder is connected to the built in preamp that comes already with all the interfaces/recorders/mixers. Though its not a very powerful preamp to power a PA system, its enough for the computer to record.


And i haven't used any cheap condensors so i can't tell much about them. Only herd they're not good. And the ones i used were expensive Neumann ones, which are pretty much the best mics you ca get out there!
Last edited by af_the_fragile at Mar 17, 2008,
#7
Well, he didn't even state whether he has an interface. Also, he could have a PCI interface, which would probably need preamps.
There is poetry in despair.
#8
Even a PCI interface sorta has a preamp.
Anything thats got a gain control has a preamp.

And if he's got a PCI interface without a gain control, then thats not something you should be using to record music with...
#9
You can get some decent cheap condenser mics. The MXL 990/991 package comes to mind as well as the MXL V63M (which I have used to a good extent). These condenser can give good results for a budget setup. Yes you can spend lots of cash on good mics, and yes they will sound better, but for a home setup it's not worth laying down that kind of money. The same goes with preamps, you can spend a little or a lot, you'll hear the difference, but usually it's not worth the large sum of money for a home setup.

Most PCI interfaces don't have preamps.
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#10
thanks for all the help and for a condensor is that just good for recording vocals or could i use that to record like overhead on drums cuz i thought i heard that somewhere too. and i also have another question could i use a mixer that i use for my pa system for recording. if so how do i do this. for recording i use a boss br 600 digital recorder
#11
one more thing so i dont need to buy a preamp im so confused on what i need and dont need. and what is like EQ and all that stuff.