#1
i was wondering what it meant when people say the bass has to lock in with the drums. i'm one of those guitar players who picked up bass, and i've never taken any bass lessons, so yeah i just wanna learn how to combine with drums better.

i've been writing songs, and i think i got it right, but i thought i'd ask you guys to be sure. okay, so when i write a song i usually have the kick drum follow what the bass does, and just make the kick and the snare sound good, and i usually put the snare on one of the quarter notes, and take out a few notes of the kick sometimes, depending on what i wanna do. is that what you're usually supposed to do? it sounds ok to me, but again i never learned any of this stuff, i just play around. i usually do that, but sometimes i use the kick-snare-kick-snare beat too.

sorry if that's confusing haha like i said, i've only taken lessons on guitar, i just picked up bass from what i know about guitar. i don't play bass like a guitar though, i used to. help me out!
#2
listen to the verse in tell me baby by rhcp and you will understand it when you listen to the bass and the kick drum

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#6
Listen its like before, you and your drummer's tempo's were wavering. So you both need to lisen to each other, that way you will "lock on" to the tempo. Also not locking between a bassist and a drummer is always the drums fault assuming that you hold a good tempo on the bass. Finally I would like to add that whether you have taken bass lessons or not, you should know what locking up means. Everybody in the band needs to be locked
#7
On a basic level, every beat that the kick-drum hits you match with the appropriate note. Just listen to some drums and whenever you hear the bass drum, play a note.
#8
Quote by Nike-Man
Listen its like before, you and your drummer's tempo's were wavering. So you both need to lisen to each other, that way you will "lock on" to the tempo. Also not locking between a bassist and a drummer is always the drums fault assuming that you hold a good tempo on the bass. Finally I would like to add that whether you have taken bass lessons or not, you should know what locking up means. Everybody in the band needs to be locked


well i've never actually played with a band, i've only played with like drum beats i made on the comp, so obviously my tempo wavered a little. i can stay on beat and all, i've just never played with a live drummer. i do know everyone needs to be on the same tempo, i just didn't know what it was called. but i appreciate the help though.
#9
Remember, "locking in with the drums" does NOT necessarily mean you HAVE to play with the bass drum or anything. So long as you play on time, and somewhat following the rhythmic patterns of the drummer, you'll be "locked in."
#10
Yeah, that phrase has always confused me, does it even mean anything more than playing in tempo?
#11
It does. It means the bassline should complement what the drums is doing and the drums should be complementing what the bass is doing. It's impossible to understand without having been in a band situation.
#12
First of all, playing in the same tempo is something you should always try to do...
What playing locked in with the drums means to me is that I'll try to play my notes (or some of them) at the same time the drummer hits the kickdrum. Or I'll ask her to pay attention to what I'm playing and hit the kick (or something else, but kick works best) the same time I play a note. When kick and bass play at the same time, they sound better than when they play sepparatly.

Most RHCP songs are great examples, but I find Aeroplaine a very good example.
And you don't have to play exactly the same rythm, the key-notes will do. You'll find that this could improve your bassline a lot.
Quote by John Swift
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#13
Tempo is one element, but as other's have eluded its a bit more. Rhythmically, you and the drummer should move as one single unit. Your melodic rhythm line should align with the drummers perfectly and become the invincible rhythm force that drives the song.

Keying in on the bass drum is a large part of this. 95% of the time you will be playing a note when the bass drum kicks. The other element to key in on is either the ride or the hi-hat cymbal. Listen to "Green Onions" by Booker T and the MGs for an example of this.

If you don't have a drummer, get yourself a drum machine or drum loops to practice with. The skill of locking with a drummer is key to your success as a bass player in a band situation.
#14
just play in time with each other. It should just be a standard thing that you do.
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your speaker is not broken in?

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