#1
help!!! in middle of writing the lead for my song, reached the bridge and i don't know what scales to use over my progression. the song is in e major and the 3 chord progression is F#m A and B... any reccomendations
#3
the song is in e major


...so use the E major scale.

The chords are all diatonic to E major, they just don't seem to want to resolve anywhere, so it's doubtful the chorus is modal in any way. Just stick to E major.
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Mar 17, 2008,
#6
e major scale

or c# minor pentatonic would be your easiest and safest bet

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Yeh the SICK! bit sounds a bit stupid.

#7
tanks its just that my lead guitarist left my band so i have to come up wit the lead ideas myself
#8
Quote by timzee117
e major scale

or c# minor pentatonic would be your easiest and safest bet



no, e major pentatonic would work.
#9
use F# dorian or minor pentatonic, because F# dorian is the 2nd mode of E major... and because you're never resolving to E, you're actually in F#.
#10
Quote by dividedsky
use F# dorian or minor pentatonic, because F# dorian is the 2nd mode of E major... and because you're never resolving to E, you're actually in F#.


The progression doesn't really resolve to F# at all. E major is actually established quite firmly, since the chords are basically an unresolved I-IV-V progression.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
if this helps the verse is the same chords.... the prechorus is Amajor, Bmajor, C#major....the chorus uses F#7, A7, B7, C#7.....if it helps
#12
What chords can I use in the E mixolydian mode for a descent solo?
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#13
Just use E major, E mixolydian or E lydian.

Make sure you're wary of the chords being used, however, as you write it so you don't hit the A# or D when they would clash with a B or D#.
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#14
Quote by CortFan1
What chords can I use in the E mixolydian mode for a descent solo?


This is a very back to front question!

If you are looking for some chords created by E mixolydian? that would be Emaj, E7, E9, E11 and E13 to name the main ones.
#15
^yep, also a I - bVII vamp works well for mixolydian too so for E mixo you could use E - D
#16
Quote by Archeo Avis
The progression doesn't really resolve to F# at all. E major is actually established quite firmly, since the chords are basically an unresolved I-IV-V progression.


You need an E to be in E. If you loop through the ii - IV - V, never actually going to I, I will not sound like the tonal center after awhile. It might be ridiculously easy to get back to E, but that doesn't make the current tonality E.

What I would play depends on the feel of the song, but staying diatonic to E is probably a good idea.
#17
Quote by Archeo Avis
The progression doesn't really resolve to F# at all. E major is actually established quite firmly, since the chords are basically an unresolved I-IV-V progression.

It sounds like it resolves to F# to me. Maybe it's just because I particularly like Dorian mode.
#18
Quote by theodds
You need an E to be in E. If you loop through the ii - IV - V, never actually going to I, I will not sound like the tonal center after awhile. It might be ridiculously easy to get back to E, but that doesn't make the current tonality E.

What I would play depends on the feel of the song, but staying diatonic to E is probably a good idea.


You don't need an E, you just need a tonal center of E.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Make sure you don't just solo over one scale. Use the chords to solo over. Practice each of the chord scales, and then put it all together. Also refer to Marty Friedman's Melodic control video, it's got a lot of useful improvisation tips.
#20
Quote by dividedsky
use F# dorian or minor pentatonic, because F# dorian is the 2nd mode of E major... and because you're never resolving to E, you're actually in F#.


Dorian is applied over minor chords (m7 and m6 as well), so as soon as the chords go to the A major and B major you'd no longer be playing in F# Dorian.
#21
Quote by theodds
You need an E to be in E. If you loop through the ii - IV - V, never actually going to I, I will not sound like the tonal center after awhile. It might be ridiculously easy to get back to E, but that doesn't make the current tonality E.

What I would play depends on the feel of the song, but staying diatonic to E is probably a good idea.


But you will play the notes of F#, A, C, E, B, D#, which when arranged gives you, E, F#, A, B, C, D#. This is will clearly resolve to E.