#3
if you're talking about pedals i think it means when the pedal is switched off the signal path bypasses the pedals circuit completely so the pedal doesn't colour the tone at all and there isn't as much loss of signal.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
Don't stress so much about "true bypass"... I believe that manufactuers use it more as a Marketing thing today than anything else.

True bypass means that when the pedal is switched off then your signal is unaffected.
A buffered pedal (not true bypass... like many Boss pedals) do not bypass... but rather "push" the signal through.

People (salesman at the music store) will tell you that true bypass = better tone. This is not true. If you have 5-6 "true bypass" pedals, you WILL have signal degredation and tone loss. The idea of the buffer is to "push" the signal so that there is no signal loss. Sometime buffered pedal will make a noticeable change in your tone and some won't.... and this fact CHANGES when you are using different Amp/Guitar combinations.

and, remember, there are good AND bad true bypass AND buffered pedals.

Always, before buying/using a pedal... listen to the sound of your guitar plugged DIRECTLY to the amp.... then add the pedals one at a time accordingly to contrast what affect they have on the tone overall... while on and off. From there, make your decision on whether it works for you.... I have owned LOTS of pedals... and this is the best way to it.
Quote by hrdcorelaxplaya
Your crappy amp achieved a purposely crappy tone? I'll alert the presses.
#5
I generally try to run one quality buffered pedal first (regardless of whether I actually use the pedal or not) and then run true bypass on everything else. The biggest benefit to a good buffer is that it will provide a high impedance load for the pickups while sending a lower impedance signal that is less apt to degrade over longer cable runs.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#6
Quote by Kendall
I generally try to run one quality buffered pedal first (regardless of whether I actually use the pedal or not) and then run true bypass on everything else. The biggest benefit to a good buffer is that it will provide a high impedance load for the pickups while sending a lower impedance signal that is less apt to degrade over longer cable runs.



great recommendation.... I know a lot of people (myself included) that use Boss TU-2 tuner at the beginning of their effects chain... buffered and will produce the end result!
Quote by hrdcorelaxplaya
Your crappy amp achieved a purposely crappy tone? I'll alert the presses.
#7
I'm patiently awaiting the day when someone builds a buffer that plugs into your guitar, runs on a 9v battery and clips to your strap with a 1/4" output jack to just plug your cable into like you normally would into the guitar.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#8
^I'm not sure where you can buy one but I've seen things like that before.
...to give your love no matter what is what she said...
#9
you know what? i think that everybody has said enough here. the TS probably gets it buy now.
/thread
Fender 72' Deluxe Tele
Schecter Damian Elite 7
Fender '62 Reissue Jazz Bass (MIJ)
Peavey XXX 212 (back on the East Coast)

Macbook Pro 15" Retina
Logic Pro X 10.0.7
Revalver 4
LePou Amp Sims
Ignite Amp Sims
LeCab2
RedWirez Impulses
#10
Quote by kumamilesbear
you know what? i think that everybody has said enough here.

I don't.

Quote by kumanilesbear
the TS probably gets it buy now.
/thread

That would be "gets it by now" just so you know.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM