#1
I'm a big fan of this site. I thought it was about time I signed up and started posting.

I love forum driven sites and the way members can freely post to exchange knowledge and improve the learning experience of everyone involved.

So what I propose is to start a questions and answers session thing. I don't claim to have the answer to all or even a significant amount of the questions that people may have, but if I don't, then someone else surely will.

So here goes. Who has a question relating to the guitar, songwriting or music theory? (That could be the first question!) Absolutely anything. I expect to be stumped by the first one, but I'll answer if I can.

I'll have questions of my own. I'm just setting the ball rolling.

If this is a bad idea, then tell me and I'll delete this thread. But hopefully it's a good idea!
#2
Good idea, but you should have started out with a few questions or something to get the ball rolling in any direction other than inertness.
#3
Good point...

OK,

Here's one:

I'm trying to get my head around the modal concept. I've learned the major scale and intervals. I get the concept of relative major and minor chords / keys / scales. I've even learned how to build chords from the major scale and play major and minor scales using combinations of major, minor and diminished chords.

But these modes still escape me. What is the best way to:

1. Organise modes in your head
2. Practice them to get a "feel" for what each one should sound like
3. Form ideas about when to use them

I appreciate that the answers may be tied up in the questions there, but if someone could give me a bit more of a "structured" method to learning this, that would be awesome. I've found Desi Serna's guitar-music-theory.com to be extremely helpful, but I still find it a difficult concept.

I guess ultimately, I want to be able to bust out some riffs and lead playing and swap between the two, using mixture of keys and modes to get a satisfying solo experience. Variations on pentatonics different chords just doesn't cut it for me any more.

How's that for an opening question?

I invite all to answer, or come back with questions that I or others may be able to answer!

Cheers!

Hamish
#4
The key to understanding modes is to realize that modes are scales. They are derived from other scales, yes, but that's as far as the relationship goes. Even though E Phrygian contains the same notes as C Major, they are not the same. E Phrygian is E Phrygian, C Major is C Major regardless of what "position" you are playing in.

Furthermore, because those two modes have the same notes, the only way to differentiate is by the backing chords. If you play the notes C D E F G A B over a C Major progression (ie C, G D C), you will be playing in C Major. If you play those notes over a pregression revolving around E Minor (but of course fits into that key signature, ie Em, Am, F7, Em), you will be playing in E Phrygian,
#5
That makes good sense...

So, playing a C major scale over an Eminor (or Gmajor) chord progression would mean that you are playing in E-phrygian. Would it still be an E-phrygian if you were playing over an Emajor (or C#Minor) chord progression?

Or does the name of the mode change according to the root note of the key you are playing in?

I guess another question would be.... if you were for instance playing one particular scale over a song that switched keys between relative major and minor, would you be playing two different modes?

I'm guessing the answer is going to be yes. And I'm guessing that the mode name for a given scale changes according to the chord you are currently in, and not the key?

Am I barking up the wrong tree?

I see no one else feels like joining in yet... Questions and / or answers are all cool.
#7
Here's a question: Can someone refresh me on backcycling? I always get myself confused unless I write it out before hand. Any tips on speeding up my theory-retardness to think up backcycling on the spot?
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#9
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This sucks, anyone can answer these questions with wikipedia

Wickipedia is crap! any one could edit it half of the stuff in it is wrong.
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#10
Quote by ChangingAString
That makes good sense...

So, playing a C major scale over an Eminor (or Gmajor) chord progression would mean that you are playing in E-phrygian. Would it still be an E-phrygian if you were playing over an Emajor (or C#Minor) chord progression?

Or does the name of the mode change according to the root note of the key you are playing in?

I guess another question would be.... if you were for instance playing one particular scale over a song that switched keys between relative major and minor, would you be playing two different modes?

I'm guessing the answer is going to be yes. And I'm guessing that the mode name for a given scale changes according to the chord you are currently in, and not the key?

Am I barking up the wrong tree?

I see no one else feels like joining in yet... Questions and / or answers are all cool.


Keep in mind that even if the chord progression resolves around E minor and you play the notes contained in the C major scale, you are playing E Phrygian and NOT C major. The progression determines the modality. If you're playing over a progression in E major and you're using the E major scale, it's E Ionian. If you had an E major chord progression and played the C major scale, you'd likely sound like you don't know what you're doing.

For the major scale there are seven modes, each with a new root note; in C major you have C Ionian, D Dorian, E Phrygian, F Lydian, G Mixolydian, A Aeolian and B Locrian. So the mode names and intervals always stay the same, but the different roots will vary according to the key.
#11
I don't guess I understand the point. If you have a question (or something to discuss) start a topic and ask your question in a sensible manner. It's like one big continuous session, just divided up into different topics that are easy to read and search for.

I do appreciate your motivation to get involved though.

DS
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#12
Quote by Mr.Cuddles
Wickipedia is crap! any one could edit it half of the stuff in it is wrong.

1. You spelled it wrong.
2. Yes, almost anyone can edit it. That means if someone edits it with wrong information, someone else is likely to correct it. And if someone intentionally edits it incorrectly, they are banned from editing wikipedia pages in the future. This doesn't eliminate all errors, but saying "half of the stuff in it is wrong" is ridiculous.