#2
...elaborate.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
You want to start with both so you're good at everything
Gear: Gibson SG standard EMG ZW pickups, vintage Acoustic combo, Boss ME-50, 12 string Ibanez.
#5
if your just starting I would get down all my open chords then probably learn the pentatonic scale. People make careers off those two things alone.
Word.
#6
You need to understand the very basic concepts of scales before you can start understanding chords.
PICTURE YOURSELF IN A BOAT ON A RIVER
WITH TANGERINE TREES AND MARMALADE SKIES...
#9
Quote by teh_Beatles
You need to understand the very basic concepts of scales before you can start understanding chords.

And how can that be achieved?
#10
Quote by Tool_46n2
You want to start with both so you're good at everything

+1 If you're talking technique do a little of both everyday. BUT if you're talking about learning theory, obviously you'll need to know your scales first.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#11
Scales can serve as an excellent warm up to a practice session. Starting with pentatonic scales could definitely work.
As far as chords, start with the basic chords. Where to go from there will probably depend a lot on on what you want to accomplish as a guitarist.
#12
Quote by smokin_sarah
depends on weather you want to play lead or rhythm guitar.

Nooooooooo! No one should ever play lead until they can play rhythm decently.

Threadstarter: If you're just beginning to learn to play guitar, you're better off memorizing some chords and learning a few easy songs at first.

If you're learning music theory, however, learn about scales first. They're the basis for chord construction.
#13
Work on chords and rhythm first. If you have a good understanding of chords, it makes learning lead so much easier. Also, rhythm is your most important tool, so work it until you can't stand to anymore, then keep going. This means ALWAYS using a metronome when you practice. If you have any friends who are good drummers, get them to teach you a bit about rhythm. If you don't know any drummers, get a good beginner snare drum method book and work through it with your hands, knees, and later, your guitar.

Every guitarist should own this book, and work through it at least once a year:
http://www.amazon.com/Chord-Chemistry-Ted-Greene/dp/0898986966/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1205792156&sr=8-1

Here's a link to an online metronome:
http://www.metronomeonline.com/
And a downloadable metronome:
http://www.pinkandaint.com/weirdmet.shtml
#14
chords before scales, I cant stand instructors that teach scales first its retarded and backwards.
#15
Quote by werty22
Nooooooooo! No one should ever play lead until they can play rhythm decently.

Threadstarter: If you're just beginning to learn to play guitar, you're better off memorizing some chords and learning a few easy songs at first.

If you're learning music theory, however, learn about scales first. They're the basis for chord construction.

+1000000000
My playing, especially when jamming, sucked for some time because I ignored rhythm technique. Playing-wise, definitely start with chords, then when you're learning theory get your scales down so you understand the logic behind the chords. Even if you don't learn much theory, know your scales anyway so you're not blindly hitting notes and hoping it sounds ok.
#16
Quote by Nightfyre
+1000000000
My playing, especially when jamming, sucked for some time because I ignored rhythm technique. Playing-wise, definitely start with chords, then when you're learning theory get your scales down so you understand the logic behind the chords. Even if you don't learn much theory, know your scales anyway so you're not blindly hitting notes and hoping it sounds ok.


Learn Chord Construction, before trying to play guitar.