#1
I recently bought an ESP (tuned to drop D [sometimes drop C#]) and now I have my RG sitting there (I installed EMG's). I love lower tunings, I used to play in drop C all the time. Would it be a good idea to slap some bari strings on it? I'm thinking since I have two guitars... why have them tuned the same.

Or is it smarter to keep the RG as a backup... I play live once or twice a week on a regular basis.
#2
Baritone guitars actually have different scale length to adjust for the additional tension so you cant make a normal guitar into a baritone guitar.

That being said, you should just do whatever you want. Do you need a backup for gigs? Or do you need the other tunings to switch between songs?

your choice.
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#3
Quote by Walternativo
Baritone guitars actually have different scale length to adjust for the additional tension so you cant make a normal guitar into a baritone guitar.

That being said, you should just do whatever you want. Do you need a backup for gigs? Or do you need the other tunings to switch between songs?

your choice.

+1. also, C is not baritone range. Put some .10s on it and you'll be fine.
#4
Warmoth sells baritone conversion necks, check there.
The longer scale length on a baritone is not to adjust for additional tensions it's so you can get a lower range. Think of a bass, longer scale lenght lower range.

Baritone range is usually B, but just like a standard guitar you can experiment with tunings.

If you want a good low, deep, sound you need a baritone, simply slapping on 10's and tuning down won't give you as good of a tone. Standard scale strings are meant to be streached to a certain tension the more slack you put in the string by de-tuning the less the string vibrates and it becomes harder for the pickups to pickup the sound.
#5
yeah you would need to put a new neck on it to make it a baritone, and possibly a new bridge to deal with the heavier strings. If your RG has a floyd you will probably have to block it at the least.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Mar 19, 2008,
#6
Quote by Kill Rockstar
Warmoth sells baritone conversion necks, check there.
The longer scale length on a baritone is not to adjust for additional tensions it's so you can get a lower range. Think of a bass, longer scale lenght lower range.

Baritone range is usually B, but just like a standard guitar you can experiment with tunings.

If you want a good low, deep, sound you need a baritone, simply slapping on 10's and tuning down won't give you as good of a tone. Standard scale strings are meant to be streached to a certain tension the more slack you put in the string by de-tuning the less the string vibrates and it becomes harder for the pickups to pickup the sound.

Good post!

What I ended up doing (for now) is just thrown on some heavy strings and have it tuned down to B. It actually sounds quite good. I have EMG's in it so that probably helps. I do want to get a new neck for it at some point because it has been starting to twist.
#7
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
yeah you would need to put a new neck on it to make it a baritone, and possibly a new bridge to deal with the heavier strings. If your RG has a floyd you will probably have to block it at the least.

Its a fixed bridge
#8
then you will still need a new neck, and you may have to file the saddles on the bridge to accommodate the thicker strings.
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