#1
So I found this diagram on the net.

http://www.diyguitarist.com/PDF_Files/EA-TremoloPCB.pdf

And I do not understand it at all.

I know that the rectangles with the lines on either end are resistors, and I think the bold rectangles and circles are capacitors, but I have no idea how the numbers/letters in the rectangles correspond to the value of the resistor/caps.

Can anyone help explain this to me?? Thanks.
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#2
I'm not an expert on this but yeah they are resistors and capacitors but the circles with one flat side look like voltage regulators. the type you need for these have a specific code written next to it like 2N3904.
I'm not sure what you don't understand, the letters in the rectangles and circles are the values so when you buy them you just ask for a 2k2 resistor or a 1uf cap, it's all written there.
where are you getting your PCB's from aswell? and if you want some help from people who know what really they're talking about, not some begginer in electronics like me, I use BYOC products and the people on the forum over there are really helpful.
http://www.buildyourownclone.com/board/
#3
Electronics engineering for the win!

2k2 means 2200 ohms
2M2 means 2.2 megOhms

the uF is micro Farads for the capacitors.

CBE is collector base emitter, three leads on the transistor. 2N3904 is a NPN transistor haha just finished my homework dealing with that particular piece.

School just got more exciting
#5
Quote by ultimo101
Electronics engineering for the win!

2k2 means 2200 ohms
2M2 means 2.2 megOhms

the uF is micro Farads for the capacitors.

CBE is collector base emitter, three leads on the transistor. 2N3904 is a NPN transistor haha just finished my homework dealing with that particular piece.

School just got more exciting

This kid knows it!

EE folks don't usually write 2200Ω because the omega (symbol for ohm, the unit of resistance) can be mistaken for a zero if you have sloppy handwriting, poor eyesight, or used a crappy copying machine to copy a schematic. We also try to avoid writing 2.2K because the decimal point tends to get "lost" for similar reasons. So yes, 2K2 means 2.2 Kilo-Ohms or 2200 Ohms. It's a bit odd to get used to the conventions, but it makes sense in the end.

The other bases are covered, so you should be fine so long as you understand all of this.


P.S. Be sure to ground your AC jack or make sure the black wire from the battery snap is connected to ground! Tonepad.com has full wiring layouts if the offboard stuff is a bit confusing.
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#6
Quote by ultimo101
Electronics engineering for the win!

2k2 means 2200 ohms
2M2 means 2.2 megOhms

the uF is micro Farads for the capacitors.

CBE is collector base emitter, three leads on the transistor. 2N3904 is a NPN transistor haha just finished my homework dealing with that particular piece.

School just got more exciting

correct. those three big things at the top are potentiometers. "Depth 1M" means that your Depth potentiometer is 1MOhm (1M = 1,000,000 Ohms). A potentiometer adjusts the amount of resistance across itself. The amount of resistance can be between 0 Ohms (theoretically) and whatever your potentiometer is rated to. Normally, these are circular and the resistance goes up or down by turning the knob.
The things labeled "2N3904" and "J201" are transistors. They can be used to turn stuff on and off or to amplify. Don't worry about the "CBE" or "SDG" labels. The chips in real life look as they do in the diagram: a circle with a straight notch taken out of them. Install the transistors as they appear in the diagram.

EDIT: man, I'm a bit rusty with my EE stuff.
Last edited by hisjap2003 at Mar 17, 2008,
#7
Quote by hisjap2003
correct. those three big things at the top are potentiometers. "Depth 1M" means that your Depth potentiometer is 1MOhm (1M = 1,000,000 Ohms). A potentiometer adjusts the amount of resistance across itself. The amount of resistance can be between 0 Ohms (theoretically) and whatever your potentiometer is rated to. Normally, these are circular and the resistance goes up or down by turning the knob.
The things labeled "2N3904" and "J201" are transistors. They can be used to turn stuff on and off or to amplify. Don't worry about the "CBE" or "SDG" labels. The chips in real life look as they do in the diagram: a circle with a straight notch taken out of them. Install the transistors as they appear in the diagram.

EDIT: man, I'm a bit rusty with my EE stuff.


The only thing with that is different manufacturers will sometimes have a different pinout (eg. EBC, ECB, BCE, etc) than what has been used on that diagram - hence you should look up a product data sheet (just punch the manufacturer and transistor type into google and you should find what you're looking for) and check the pinout.
"Everybody, one day will die and be forgotten. Act and behave in a way that will make life interesting and fun. Find a passion, form relationships, don't be afraid to get out there and fuck what everyone else thinks."
#8
Quote by the_random_hero
The only thing with that is different manufacturers will sometimes have a different pinout (eg. EBC, ECB, BCE, etc) than what has been used on that diagram - hence you should look up a product data sheet (just punch the manufacturer and transistor type into google and you should find what you're looking for) and check the pinout.

true, but it sounds like TS might get a little intimidated by a datasheet. I'm just trying to keep things simple
#9
DUDE, i just checked that diagram quickly, and from what i can tell, those "2N3904" transistors should be flipped. like 180 degrees to left or right. can someone take a look and confirm this. i dont know if it'll make a big difference though. tell me how it comes out.
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#10
Thanks for the help, guys! That stuff's really complex!

BTW, for the standard 1/4 inch instrument jack, is the main barrel of the plug or the tip of the plug the ground?
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#11
Quote by matthewchj
Thanks for the help, guys! That stuff's really complex!

BTW, for the standard 1/4 inch instrument jack, is the main barrel of the plug or the tip of the plug the ground?


Main barrel.
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#12
Quote by kurtlives91
^they teach that basic stuff in EE?

Where do you go to school?


yeah and how each component works and such. First year stuff.
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#13
Quote by THE Saint Jimmy
DUDE, i just checked that diagram quickly, and from what i can tell, those "2N3904" transistors should be flipped. like 180 degrees to left or right. can someone take a look and confirm this. i dont know if it'll make a big difference though. tell me how it comes out.
Nah, it's right. Data sheets show the pin connections from the BOTTOM. That's the top view of the board. That's why you thought the order was reversed.
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#14
Was looking at the diagram again... Sorry for asking such a noob question, but where does the switch to turn the effect on and off go? Does it just bridge the input/output wires or does it go on the PCB?


EDIT: Never mind, googled.
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Last edited by matthewchj at Mar 19, 2008,