#1
6. In order for electrons to be available to be gained by an ion, another atom has to have given up the electrons. Below is an example of how electrons are transferred between silver ions and zinc atoms

Ag(+) + 1e(-) --> Ag

Zn--> Zn(2) + 2e(-)


The parenthesis represent superscripts

how many electrons does each zinc atom give up? I think it's 2

How many electrons does each silver ion accept? I think thats 1

Can one zinc atom transfer its electrons to one silver ion... I'm going to say no, but I'm not sure?

if one zinc atom gives up electrons how many silver ions will have to be present to accept the electrons- I dnno?

can someone give me the right answers, but actually explain it to me.

#2
your right about how many atoms it has to give up on both questions.

and it has to do that because in order for it to stil be a stable molecule, it has to have an equal amount of electrons, zinc can take two so it has to give up two as well, same with silver.

hoped that helped
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#3
Dude, I do Chemistry and I should know this but I don't. Way to make me feel dumb >.>
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#4
Quote by carbonchemicals
your right about how many atoms it has to give up on both questions.

and it has to do that because in order for it to stil be a stable molecule, it has to have an equal amount of electrons, zinc can take two so it has to give up two as well, same with silver.

hoped that helped



Thanks I understood that, but now it's more clear

but what about the other two questions?
#5
um...yes to the first one because as long as it gives up an atom and recieves the same amount its still stable

and idk about the last one. sorry
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#6
A silver Ion will never gain an electron, because it's electro negativity is too high
#7
chem major here

1. 2 because it goes from 0 to 2+, therefore two electrons must be given up
2. 1 because it goes from 1 to 0, therefore it must accept one electron
3. no because the charges will not equal each other
4. 2 because Zn gives up 2, to make the rxn equal there must be twice as many mols of Ag present to balance the rxn. remember

2Ag(1+) + Zn --> 2Ag + Zn (2+)

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#8
Basically you just have to balance the charge on both sides of the equation

So if it were
2 Ag(+) + Zn --> Zn(2+) + 2Ag

beaten to it.... I'm a Polymer Chemist... we don't do redox... it took me a few minutes
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#9
Wait is this a problem that is taking place in an aqueous solution? Like with a cation that is in the water/solvent as well?
#10
Quote by imgooley
Wait is this a problem that is taking place in an aqueous solution? Like with a cation that is in the water/solvent as well?



its just a fictitious problem in a book, we do ALL of our chem work as a lab then have a section review over it,

i suck at on hand work