#1
Ok say im praticing the g major scale, which starts on G and ends on G, however im confused if im playing it on the G string and i start on open G then does it end on G on the 12th fret? , is every note after that considered part of the mode, or do i continue down past the 12th fret, hopefully this doesnt sound confusing

thanks!
#2
All scales cover the entire fretboard. You can play the notes anywhere you want, and in any order.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by Archeo Avis
All scales cover the entire fretboard. You can play the notes anywhere you want, and in any order.

i love you, but he said he's playing the g major scale, not "playing in g major".

yes you would end on g. to play the g major scale you would play the notes: g, a, b, c, d, e, f#, g in that order.

in your example (starting on open g) you would play open, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 12th frets.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


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#4
but he said he's playing the g major scale, not "playing in g major".


...and?

yes you would end on g. to play the g major scale you would play the notes: g, a, b, c, d, e, f#, g in that order.


You can play them in any order, and you can end on whatever note you want. It's still G major unless the song was specifically designed to be modal.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by HeadSouth!
Ok say im praticing the g major scale, which starts on G and ends on G, however im confused if im playing it on the G string and i start on open G then does it end on G on the 12th fret? , is every note after that considered part of the mode, or do i continue down past the 12th fret, hopefully this doesnt sound confusing

thanks!


It is only a mode if the scale formula is not the same as the Major scale. If the notes are the same as Gmaj, it must have a different note functioning as the tonic.
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
...and?


You can play them in any order, and you can end on whatever note you want. It's still G major unless the song was specifically designed to be modal.

so if i play the notes: f#, a, g, c, e

i can say that i played the g major scale according to your logic?


edit: i think you're just making a simple question more complicated than it is. but you're a hell of a lot more knowlegable than me so maybe i'm just a jackass. i have no clue.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Mar 18, 2008,
#7
Quote by metal4all
so if i play the notes: f#, a, g, c, e

i can say that i played the g major scale according to your logic?


Yes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
Yes.

Those notes are in the key of G major but it's not the G major scale. A major scale is a set of intervals of 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8. In G, that would be G,A,B,C,D,E,F#,G. So to play the G major scale you would play those notes in order (if you don't play them in that order the intervals get messed up so you're technically not playing the G major scale but playing in G major.

What am i missing?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#9
if you don't play them in that order the intervals get messed up so you're technically not playing the G major scale but playing in G major.


The key determines the scale. The order of the notes doesn't matter at all. Scales are collections of notes with a meaningful relationship. If the tonal center is G and you use those notes (in any order), you are using the G major scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Mar 18, 2008,
#10
I know you don't have to run up and down a box shape to use a scale but if someone asked you to play the g major scale would you not play G,A,B,C,D,E,F#,G?

i think you're just making this too complicated.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#11
Quote by metal4all
I know you don't have to run up and down a box shape to use a scale but if someone asked you to play the g major scale would you not play G,A,B,C,D,E,F#,G?

i think you're just making this too complicated.


I'm not making this complicated, you're just wrong. I would play the notes in that order because it's the easiest way to demonstrate the scale to someone. You argued that the notes have to be played in that order to be the G major scale, which amounts to nothing more than running up and down a box shape (only up, actually, since down would put the notes in a different order)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
I still think you're just mixing up the wording of playing the G major scale and playing in G major and way overcomplicating a simple question. I don't know. I'm probably wrong. I want to hear what someone else says (idc if that means i'm wrong). I haven't slept for a day and a half so i really don't feel like this.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#13
metal4all: I think what he's saying is that the key is G major so the G major scale will naturally be determined; the key naturally determines the scale you'll use. Because of the fact that you're playing in the key of G major, you will naturally be selecting the notes G, A, B, C, D, E, F# and G; thus, you will be playing the G major scale.

Archeo, correct me if I'm wrong here.
#14
Quote by :-D
metal4all: I think what he's saying is that the key is G major so the G major scale will naturally be determined; the key naturally determines the scale you'll use. Because of the fact that you're playing in the key of G major, you will naturally be selecting the notes G, A, B, C, D, E, F# and G; thus, you will be playing the G major scale.

Archeo, correct me if I'm wrong here.


Exactly. If the tonal center is G, the notes of the G major scale in any order are the G major scale, regardless of which note you start or end on.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
it doesn't really matter about anything at all. Scales are more of just guidelines anyways. That's why you can play whatever you want as long as it sounds good with the chord progression you're playing with or whatever. It's Music Theory; the only technical thing about a guitar is that it needs strings. Other than that the possibilities are always going to be endless. So you don't ever have to end on that note, ending on that note makes things easier a lot of the time but there are no technicalities when it comes to music. Always remember the number one rule, there are no rules.
#16
Quote by Archeo Avis
Exactly. If the tonal center is G, the notes of the G major scale in any order are the G major scale, regardless of which note you start or end on.
But Archeo, this is how a Major scale is/can be used in music.

If someone asked you, "hey can you play the Gmaj scale for me, I want to figure out some changes" you would just play up and down from G to G.
Quote by metal4all
i love you, but he said he's playing the g major scale, not "playing in g major"..
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#17
sorry, im imposing...but i dont understand what you guys are talking about 2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th, 11th, 12th...

i thought this was the g major scale:

|-----------------------------------------2--3--5--------------------|
|-----------------------------------3--5-----------------------------|
|--------------------------2--4--5-----------------------------------|
|-----------------2--4--5--------------------------------------------|
|--------2--3--5-----------------------------------------------------|
|--3--5--------------------------------------------------------------|
Quote by SteveHouse
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#18
Quote by KryptNet
But Archeo, this is how a Major scale is/can be used in music.

If someone asked you, "hey can you play the Gmaj scale for me, I want to figure out some changes" you would just play up and down from G to G.


Yes, because the scale is most commonly associated as beginning on the tonic and either ascending or descending. If your tonal center is G, and you play the notes A B C D E F# G, you're playing in the G major scale regardless of the order. I believe metal4all had said that you wouldn't be playing the G major scale, which would be incorrect.

EDIT: talia.: No, the G major scale is not a position, it's a group of notes applicable all over the fretboard; you've provided one example of a way to play it. The G major scale is G A B C D E F#; don't confine yourself to frets, boxes and positions.
#19
Quote by KryptNet
But Archeo, this is how a Major scale is/can be used in music.

If someone asked you, "hey can you play the Gmaj scale for me, I want to figure out some changes" you would just play up and down from G to G.


To correctly ask someone to do this, one should have to say "Play the G major scale Ascending and descending in one octave". However, most people when asked to play the G major scale will play it ascending and descending in one octave in "alphabetical order".
#20
Quote by :-D
Yes, because the scale is most commonly associated as beginning on the tonic and either ascending or descending. If your tonal center is G, and you play the notes A B C D E F# G, you're playing in the G major scale regardless of the order. I believe metal4all had said that you wouldn't be playing the G major scale, which would be incorrect.

EDIT: talia.: No, the G major scale is not a position, it's a group of notes applicable all over the fretboard; you've provided one example of a way to play it. The G major scale is G A B C D E F#; don't confine yourself to frets, boxes and positions.


ok. i believe i get it, thanks.
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